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Agrippa (A Book of the Dead)



Dear Book Arts folks,

I first sent this message out to ExLibris a week ago, so pardon the
duplication for those of you with dual citizenship. I have not been getting
very much response from the ExLibrans, so maybe you guys have some input.

I am working on a Master's Degree in English on how the format and design
of books affect their literary content. One of the "books" I am looking at
is _Agrippa (A Book of the Dead)_ by William Gibson (NY, NY: Kevin Begos
Publishing, 1992). For those of you unfamiliar with it, it was initially
available as a computer diskette packaged within an "artist's book" type
codex rendered in light-sensitive ink. The text file on the disk contains
an encryption code which in theory prevents more than one reading of the
poem. However the code was cracked and the computer disk text is now widely
available on the internet.

I would like to know which libraries (or organizations or people, for that
matter), if any, purchased the original collector's edition from Kevin
Begos Publishing, and if so, what was the motivation for the purchase
(faculty request? new media collection?) and how is "the book" being
handled. Was it "read" as a research project? Is it being stored in closed
stacks as an oddity?

Anyone willing to share any information, please reply to me directly,
unless you feel your reply would be of interest to the entire list. Any
other information about Agrippa would also be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Winston Pei

------------
Black Riders Design

       mailto:info@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  or find us on the worldwide web at http://www.blackriders.com/


 "I like to look at it, merely sit and look at it,take it all in without
moving an eye. It gives me more than rhymed poetry. It rhymes in my eyes.
   Here are Black Riders for me at last galloping across a blank page."

                          - Robert Carlton Brown
                             on his optical poem "Eyes on the Half-Shell"


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