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>Indeed, when Richard Minsky or Brian Queen  or  Susan Gaylord  or any other
garu shares with us their vast know how - we would still  have to outdo them
in a BIG way to be any competition to their job tenure, income, or status. <

Daria <dherlihy@xxxxxxxx>
.....


Thanx for the kudos, Daria, but its a myth. I have no job tenure, as a
self-employed artist. If anyone is interested in giving me tenure, I'm all
ears =):>}. Perhaps I'll compose a "position sought" and post it.

        R

..........

BTW, the "for hire" category is probably important.  If you do something
for hire, which I suppose might include doing a commission, there might be
a question who owns the copyright unless you specify it in a contract.  Or
so I understand. Ask an attorney... $:-)

"Judith B. Kerman" <kerman@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
....


Judith has a good personal decision process. Work for hire must be specified
as such in the agreement or copyright reverts to the creator, according to
the LC copyright basics website. http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/

        R
...............

Interestingly
enough, with many great ideas/inventions, sometimes they are discovered
simultaneously many thousands of miles apart.

Mary Hackney <hackneym@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
....

Serendipity strikes. And in a culture conditions become ripe for the
development and somebody is ready to receive the muse. Like the 1500
volcanose of Earth, we don't know when or where an eruption will occur. The
pressure is underground.

In the creative arts, it remains significant to record the evolution of
thought and practice. It helps us further our understanding of the creative
process as well as the dissemination of aesthetic change. Each development
sets the climate for the furtherance of it. Certainly similar ideas may
develop within a culture simultaneously, and hopefully will be reflected in
the history books. Generally I have observed that if two works by different
artists look similar it is because they have a common progenitor, or have
worked together communally to establish an aesthetic dialogue.




        R


            Richard
            http://minsky.com


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