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Re: Binary Number Query



Here's a brief answer, but I'd be glad to discuss this in more detail
off
the list if you like.

There are several things at work behind your question. ASCII is one of
several different ways to _encode_ characters and symbols as numbers;
alternate encodings include EBCDIC.  ASCII defines the relationship
between each character and its number: A is represented by the number
65 and z is 122 (1 is 49, 2 is 50, etc).  The second part is how do
you represent the number?  For computers, you have to use binary,
because computers think and store information using single bits that
are either on or off.  So 65 becomes 100001, 122 becomes 1111010, and
so forth.  There are several ways to convert among bases.  If you have
a shell account on a Unix system, the desk calculator (dc) will do it.
Or, you can learn the easy trick to convert between octal and binary,
and use an octal chart of the ASCII character set.

So, ASCII is one (arbitrary) way to encode characters and binary is one
(convenient) way to encode numbers.  Here's a complete ASCII table,
showing the decimal values of all 128 ASCII characters:

     |  0 nul |  1 soh |  2 stx |  3 etx |  4 eot |  5 enq |  6 ack |  7
bel |
     |  8 bs  |  9 ht  | 10 nl  | 11 vt  | 12 np  | 13 cr  | 14 so  | 15
si  |
     | 16 dle | 17 dc1 | 18 dc2 | 19 dc3 | 20 dc4 | 21 nak | 22 syn | 23
etb |
     | 24 can | 25 em  | 26 sub | 27 esc | 28 fs  | 29 gs  | 30 rs  | 31
us  |
     | 32 sp  | 33 !   | 34 "   | 35 #   | 36 $   | 37 %   | 38 &   | 39
'   |
     | 40 (   | 41 )   | 42 *   | 43 +   | 44 ,   | 45 -   | 46 .   | 47
/   |
     | 48 0   | 49 1   | 50 2   | 51 3   | 52 4   | 53 5   | 54 6   | 55
7   |
     | 56 8   | 57 9   | 58 :   | 59 ;   | 60 <   | 61 =   | 62 >   | 63
?   |
     | 64 @   | 65 A   | 66 B   | 67 C   | 68 D   | 69 E   | 70 F   | 71
G   |
     | 72 H   | 73 I   | 74 J   | 75 K   | 76 L   | 77 M   | 78 N   | 79
O   |
     | 80 P   | 81 Q   | 82 R   | 83 S   | 84 T   | 85 U   | 86 V   | 87
W   |
     | 88 X   | 89 Y   | 90 Z   | 91 [   | 92 \   | 93 ]   | 94 ^   | 95
_   |
     | 96 `   | 97 a   | 98 b   | 99 c   |100 d   |101 e   |102 f   |103
g   |
     |104 h   |105 i   |106 j   |107 k   |108 l   |109 m   |110 n   |111
o   |
     |112 p   |113 q   |114 r   |115 s   |116 t   |117 u   |118 v   |119
w   |
     |120 x   |121 y   |122 z   |123 {   |124 |   |125 }   |126 ~   |127
del |

I hope this helps.

Regards,

        David Macfarlane,
        Green Dolphin Press (http://www.bway.net/~dmac/gdp).

Peter D. Verheyen wrote:
>
> Working on an idea for an alphabet book. What I'd like to do is include a
> representation of  the letters in binary form. My guess is the binary form
> would be derived from the ASCII character number, but I could be wrong.
> Anyone have a clue as to where I can find more information, or a converter
> from base 10 to base 2. The last time I even counted in binary was back in
> 6th-7th grade... I think they called it new math.
>
> Any help would be appreciated.
>
> Peter
> >>>       I love working in the library. There is             <<<
> >>something to be said for working in a place bound in leather.<<
>
> Peter D. Verheyen           <wk> 315.443.9937   <fax>315.443.9510
> <Email>                            mailto:pdverhey@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> <Webmaster>                    http://www.dreamscape.com/pdverhey
> <Listowner>           mailto:Book_Arts-L-Request@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


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