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Fw: goldleaf



----------
> From: Don Guyot <colophon@xxxxxxxxx>
> To: colophon@xxxxxxxxx; Book_Arts-L: The list for all the book arts!
<BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: goldleaf
> Date: Wednesday, April 08, 1998 10:01 AM
>
> 04.07.98
>
> Regarding my post about goldleaf....
>
> Apparently I misspoke about the rouge/armenian bole not being used
between
> the sheets of paper in gold books.
>
> I stand corrected, with my thanks to Ms Jackson and the good folks at
Sepp
> Leaf.
>
> And now to explain the confusion...chalk, or, more specifically, French
> Chalk is used by bookbinders, as myself, to dust the edges of books prior
> to gilding them to prevent their being stuck shut during the gilding
> process.  Simply looks to meas though I got my chalk in the wrong place,
> for which I apologize.
>
> again, Sally, thanks
>
> don       colopohon@xxxxxxxx
>
> ----------
> > From: Don Guyot <colophon@xxxxxxxxx>
> > To: Book_Arts-L: The list for all the book arts!
> <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> > Subject: Re: goldleaf
> > Date: Tuesday, April 07, 1998 8:48 AM
> >
> > 04.05.98
> >
> > I add the following from my experience with gold leaf, for the record.
> >
> > 1.  Patent gold leaf is in no way inferior to sheet leaf, the
difference
> > being that the gold is actually attached to a thin sheet of paper in
> order
> > to allow its use by sign painters and sign gilders and others who must
> work
> > outdoors.  Sheet gold is absolutely intractible in even the slighest
> draft,
> > as anyone who has worked with that material will attest.  So, patent
gold
> > is a variety of gold leaf, not a poor cousin to the <<real thing>>.
> >
> > 2.  Sheet gold is kept from attaching itself to the interleaving of the
> > books in which its is sold not by a dusting of armenian bole, which is
> the
> > color of rust, which is what it is, iron oxide, also known as burnt
> sienna
> > or russett, when it is sold as a pigment, but by chaulk, or talc.
> >
> > 3.  The talk is used, the chaulk is used because it is white and more
> > easily picked up after, should the bane of any gilder occur, spilling
> some
> > of the dust onto the work in hand.   Can you image doing the same with
a
> > pile of rust dropped onto a folio of uterine vellum--pure white unborn
> calf
> > skin.  Yep!!!!
> >
> > 4. Gold leaf is also sold by color, as, Lemon Gold, Pale Gold, Extra
> Pale,
> > Deep, Double Deep and probably a few I have forgotten.  Hey, give me a
> > break!  Colored gold is made by adding to it varying quantities of
other
> > metals (silver, copper, etc) before it is beaten into sheets of  single
> or
> > of double thickness, which is a modern distinction, and one not known
> > throughout MOST of the 19th Century, at least among bookbinders and
> > illuminators.
> >
> > 5.  Incidentally, I have known sign painters who called patent gold
> "glass
> > gold" becasue they used it for the lettering on the glass doors in real
> > old-time office buildings, like those peopled by the Mickey Spilaines
of
> > the world, and a few attorneys, dentists, doctors, collection agents
and
> > whomever else.  They used it in this application because the door,
often
> > attatched to the opening it closed, bore the surface on which they were
> > impelled to work in a vertical aspect, not horizontal as with
bookbinders
> > and illuminators and calligraphers.
> >
> > And that's the truth, as Lily Tomlin used to say!!!
> >
> > don guyot      colophon@xxxxxxxxx
> >
> > ----------
> > > From: norman kretzmann <nk25@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> > > To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> > > Subject: goldleaf
> > > Date: Sunday, April 05, 1998 9:57 AM
> > >
> > >         I've always wondered exactly what constituted the differences
> in
> > > goldleaf between, say the XX Regular, the XX Glass (selected for
glass
> > > gilding, I know), and the XX Patent, when they're all 23karet?
> >
> > >                                         Barbara Kretzmann


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