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Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 19 Jun 2000 to 20 Jun 2000 (#2000-167)



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Patricia,
The method is quite simple, I tried it without any luck due to the fact that I
want to print on very sheer fabric. It works excellently on cotton fabric that
has some weight to it. First you wash the fabric to remove as much sizing as
possible. Cut a sheet of freezer paper the same size as the fabric, taking into
account your printer limitations. You will iron the freezer paper onto the fabric
with as little fabric overhang as possible. First iron the fabric to remove
wrinkles and excess moisture. Then place the fabric onto the shiny side of the
freezer paper and iron it with a dry iron setting. The shiny side of the freezer
paper is actually a plastic coating that will melt and adhere to the fabric,
enabling you to have something that will feed into the printer. After it's
printed let it dry and then you can peel off the freezer paper backing. If you
wish to seal the fabric then you'll have to seal it, I haven't tried this but
there were different methods recommended to me such as clear silicone sealant.

I did get something to print on sheer fabric, but it isn't good enough, I'll keep
trying.

Janet Lorch



Janet-
can you explain a little more about the freezer paper and inkjet method? I
have never heard of it. Do you print on the freezer paper and then transfer
it onto the fabric? Or print directly on the fabric?
Thanks for any hints.
Patricia Silva
Florence, Italy



One possibility I'm thinking of is using the freezer paper method with an ink jet

printer on fabric. I don't have any experience with this and would appreciate any

advice as to which fabrics are the most transparent and if there is a way to make

them even more so. I saw a show that used this method and the artist recommended
silk that had been treated with beeswax or sugar starch.

Janet Lorch

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<html>
Patricia,
<br>The method is quite simple, I tried it without any luck due to the
fact that I want to print on very sheer fabric. It works excellently on
cotton fabric that has some weight to it. First you wash the fabric to
remove as much sizing as possible. Cut a sheet of freezer paper the same
size as the fabric, taking into account your printer limitations. You will
iron the freezer paper onto the fabric with as little fabric overhang as
possible. First iron the fabric to remove wrinkles and excess moisture.
Then place the fabric onto the shiny side of the freezer paper and iron
it with a dry iron setting. The shiny side of the freezer paper is actually
a plastic coating that will melt and adhere to the fabric, enabling you
to have something that will feed into the printer. After it's printed let
it dry and then you can peel off the freezer paper backing. If you wish
to seal the fabric then you'll have to seal it, I haven't tried this but
there were different methods recommended to me such as clear silicone sealant.
<p>I did get something to print on sheer fabric, but it isn't good enough,
I'll keep trying.
<p>Janet Lorch
<br><i></i>&nbsp;
<br><i></i>&nbsp;<i></i>
<p><i>Janet-</i>
<br><i>can you explain a little more about the freezer paper and inkjet
method? I</i>
<br><i>have never heard of it. Do you print on the freezer paper and then
transfer</i>
<br><i>it onto the fabric? Or print directly on the fabric?</i>
<br><i>Thanks for any hints.</i>
<br><i>Patricia Silva</i>
<br><i>Florence, Italy</i>
<br><i></i>&nbsp;
<br><i></i>&nbsp;<i></i>
<p><i>One possibility I'm thinking of is using the freezer paper method
with an ink jet</i>
<br><i>printer on fabric. I don't have any experience with this and would
appreciate any</i>
<br><i>advice as to which fabrics are the most transparent and if there
is a way to make</i>
<br><i>them even more so. I saw a show that used this method and the artist
recommended</i>
<br><i>silk that had been treated with beeswax or sugar starch.</i>
<p><i>Janet Lorch</i></html>

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