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Re: Letterpress or DTP software?



Thank you Richard,

This is really close to what I would have said had not my ire been loosed.

May the Goddess be with you,

GREENMAN

"Anyone desiring a quite life has done badly to be born in the twentieth
century"  L. Trotsky

----------
>From: Richard Miller <rmiller@PETERBORO.NET>
>To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>Subject: Re: Letterpress or DTP software?
>Date: Sun, Jul 2, 2000, 7:59 PM
>

> Suzanne has asked some relatively easy questions but the answers are
> difficult. Like so many other choices, it depends on what *you* want.
>
> Letterpress printing is difficult to do well. It is time, and space,
> consuming. And, as Pat has pointed out, it is dirty, both in terms of ink
> and cleaning solvents. On the other hand the end result can cause emotional
> responses bordering on sinful ;-)
>
> Suzanne, ask yourself if you respond equally to a hand-bound book and a
> commercially bound book? Do you respond equally to a letterpress page and a
> laser-printed page? If the answer to either is yes, or that you can't see
> the difference, I recommend DTP. As one who has done both I submit that DTP
> has a more immediate gratification, is easier to make changes, and is
> capable of better halftone reproduction. Also, future technological
> development will be geared to improving ease of use and quality of image
> reproduction whereas letterpress is an antiquated -- though not dead --
> technology, meaning any improvements will be made by individuals attempting
> to solve individual problems rather than trying to advance the
> possibilities of industrial technology.
>
> I suspect that, in the long run, letterpress may be somewhat cheaper mainly
> because if you are a careful shopper you will find bargains on what is,
> essentially, antiquated equipment which, when properly cared for, will last
> your lifetime. Computers are less well made and expensive to fix. Also they
> become outdated fairly quickly and most people have a tendency to want the
> latest models with faster speeds and more bells and whistles. Software is
> incredibly expensive, especially for occasional users who can't amortize
> the costs the way professional users can. Computer equipment takes up much
> less space than does computer equipment and the space doesn't need to be
> reinforced to carry the weight of iron presses and tons of lead type.
>
> It sounds to me that you have already explored several different -- of the
> many -- methods of making marks on paper (rubber stamping, calligraphy) and
> you state that, at this point, you are happy to make blank books. I
> strongly recommend that before you invest in a letterpress shop you attend
> several workshops or even offer yourself as an apprentice to a letterpress
> printer. If you are still enamoured of the process then more power to you.
>
> Good luck,
> Richard
>
>
> ----------------------------------------
> Richard Miller <rmiller@peterboro.net>
>
> I'd rather be a failure at something I enjoy
> than be a success at something I hate. (George Burns)
>
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>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>
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