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Re: FW: Archival: Inkjet versus Laser



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At 08:27 AM 7/12/00, David Goen wrote:
...
>Of the generally available commercial products, only the very newest Epson
>printers are archival.  Their latest is now said to be archival to several
>hundred years. The 1270 is said to be good for about 70 years. The others,
>including the any Epson printer introduced before their recent technology
>change s  , don't even come close: more like 1-2 years before significant
>fading. I wouldn't use any of the regular inkjets for anything other than
>proofing and short-lived documents.

This strikes me as interesting.  I have examples of inkjet printing on hand
that must be several years old, which show no signs of fading.  These were
made on an HP inkjet.  Of course, they have not been much exposed to
light.  What are the circumstances which cause these inks to fade?  Is
there some protocol for testing which gives these figures?

>There are third party inkjet ink sellers that are more reasonably archival,
>but usually you must purge your system of OEM inks and use only their very
>expensive inks from that point forward .

Perhaps you could be so kind as to tell us which vendors supply archival inks?

Gavin Stairs
Gavin Stairs Fine Editions

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<html>
<font size=3>At 08:27 AM 7/12/00, David Goen wrote:<br>
</font>...<br>
<blockquote type=cite cite><font size=3>Of the generally available
commercial products, only the very newest Epson<br>
printers are archival.&nbsp; Their latest is now said to be archival to
several<br>
hundred years. The 1270 is said to be good for about 70 years. The
others,<br>
including the any Epson printer introduced before their recent
technology<br>
change s&nbsp; , don't even come close: more like 1-2 years before
significant<br>
fading. I wouldn't use any of the regular inkjets for anything other
than<br>
proofing and short-lived documents.</blockquote><br>
</font>This strikes me as interesting.&nbsp; I have examples of inkjet
printing on hand that must be several years old, which show no signs of
fading.&nbsp; These were made on an HP inkjet.&nbsp; Of course, they have
not been much exposed to light.&nbsp; What are the circumstances which
cause these inks to fade?&nbsp; Is there some protocol for testing which
gives these figures?<br>
<br>
<blockquote type=cite cite><font size=3>There are third party inkjet ink
sellers that are more reasonably archival,<br>
but usually you must purge your system of OEM inks and use only their
very<br>
expensive inks from that point forward .</blockquote><br>
Perhaps you could be so kind as to tell us which vendors supply archival
inks?<br>
<br>
Gavin Stairs<br>
Gavin Stairs Fine Editions<br>
</font></html>

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