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Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 22 Aug 2001 to 23 Aug 2001 (#2001-225)



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Sheesh!

When you're working on something of your own why do you care how someone
else might categorize it?

Sticks and stones etc. . . . applies here in spades!

Charles Schermerhorn
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Sent: Thursday, August 23, 2001 9:02 PM
Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 22 Aug 2001 to 23 Aug 2001 (#2001-225)


> There are 11 messages totalling 575 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Sewing Frame (3)
>   2. Southern California events (2)
>   3. Metamorphosis: Contemporary Forms in Book Arts
>   4. Book Art vs. Book Arts (4)
>   5. Montefiascone Summer program report
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 13:49:10 -0400
> From:    Kristy Higby <Kristy_Higby@MERCERSBURG.EDU>
> Subject: Sewing Frame
>
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>
> I'm looking for a canterlevered sewing frame. Does anyone have one they'd
=
> like to sell? Thank you, Kristy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 10:46:48 -0700
> From:    Umbrella <umbrella@IX.NETCOM.COM>
> Subject: Re: Southern California events
>
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>
> Visual Icons, an exhibiton of book art featuring the works of Slater
Barron,
> Terry Braunstein, Lisa Hart, Piaz Pizzo, Genie Shenk, Carol Barton, Sylvia
> Glass, Katherine Ng, and Sue Ann Robinson, curated by Jean Clad, will open
> tonight 23 August from 7 - 9 p.m. at the Long Beach City College Art
> Gallery, 4901 E. Carson St., Bldg.K, Room 100, Long Beach
> (http://artgallery.lbcc.cc.ca.us) and will continued through 27 September
> 2001.
>
> Lectures in the Gallery:
> Judith A. Hoffberg on Thursday 29 August at 7:30 p.m.
> Sylvia Glass on 13 September at 1:30 p.m.
> Slater Barron on 19 September at 1:30 p.m.
> Workshop:  Sue Ann Robinson on 15 September from 1 -3 p.m.
>
> Call the Gallery for more information at (562/938-4815)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 11:56:47 -0600
> From:    Kay Moller <moller@SPOT.COLORADO.EDU>
> Subject: Re: Southern California events
>
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>
> The website for this show has a really nice flash display of some of the
> books!
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Book_Arts-L: READ THE FAQ at http://www.philobiblon.com
> > [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU]On Behalf Of Umbrella
> > Sent: Thursday, August 23, 2001 11:47 AM
> > To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Southern California events
> >
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
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> >
> > Visual Icons, an exhibiton of book art featuring the works of
> > Slater Barron,
> > Terry Braunstein, Lisa Hart, Piaz Pizzo, Genie Shenk, Carol
> > Barton, Sylvia
> > Glass, Katherine Ng, and Sue Ann Robinson, curated by Jean
> > Clad, will open
> > tonight 23 August from 7 - 9 p.m. at the Long Beach City College Art
> > Gallery, 4901 E. Carson St., Bldg.K, Room 100, Long Beach
> > (http://artgallery.lbcc.cc.ca.us) and will continued through
> > 27 September
> > 2001.
> >
> > Lectures in the Gallery:
> > Judith A. Hoffberg on Thursday 29 August at 7:30 p.m.
> > Sylvia Glass on 13 September at 1:30 p.m.
> > Slater Barron on 19 September at 1:30 p.m.
> > Workshop:  Sue Ann Robinson on 15 September from 1 -3 p.m.
> >
> > Call the Gallery for more information at (562/938-4815)
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> >             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >
> >         To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
> >                             UNSUB Book_Arts-L
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 13:52:59 -0400
> From:    Peter Verheyen <verheyen@PHILOBIBLON.COM>
> Subject: Re: Sewing Frame
>
>              ***********************************************
>            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
>      the digest) for instructions on searching the archive, setting
>                   your list options,and unsubscribing.
>              ***********************************************
>
> Depending on your budget, the best one around is Tim Ely's. You can see it
> with purchasing info at <http://www.philobiblon.com/probono.htm>. I have
> one and love. It's easy to set up, adjust, and looks just too cool.
>
> Peter
>
> >I'm looking for a canterlevered sewing frame. Does anyone have one they'd
=
> >like to sell? Thank you, Kristy
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
> Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
> Peter D. Verheyen
> <mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
> <http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 16:31:02 -0400
> From:    Barbara Korb <korbb@STORM.BUCKS.EDU>
> Subject: Metamorphosis: Contemporary Forms in Book Arts
>
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>
> Metamorphosis: Contemporary Forms in Book Arts
> August 29 - October 20, 2001
>
> Reception: Thursday September 13, 5-7 PM
> Curator's Gallery Talk at 6 PM
>
> Hicks Art Center Gallery
> Department of the Arts
> Bucks County Community College
> 275 Swamp Road
> Newtown, PA 18940
>
> Carol Barton
> e Bond
> Jennifer Bortz
> Denise Carbone
> Jungohk Cho (Theresa)
> Dee Collins
> Laurie Coughlin
> Jan Dickler
> Caren Friedman
> Carrie Galbraith
> Elizabeth Ann Gross
> Hedi Kyle
> Melissa MacAlpin
> Dan Mayer
> Kathleen Pearson
> John L. Risseeuw
> Linda Smith
> Patricia M. Smith
> Susan Viguers
>
> Fran Orlando, Director of Exhibitions
> Barbara Korb, Guest Curator
>
>
> Summer Gallery Hours (through Sept 17)
> Monday - Friday, 9 AM - 4 PM
>
> Gallery Hours (after Sept 17)
> Monday and Friday, 9 AM - 4 PM
> Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9 AM - 8 PM
> Saturday, 9 AM - Noon
>
>
> This exhibition is supported in part by a grant from
> the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts,
> a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania,
> and the National Endowment for the Arts.
>
> All events are free and open to the public
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 18:18:12 -0400
> From:    Richard Minsky <minsky@MINSKY.COM>
> Subject: Book Art vs. Book Arts
>
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>
> Judith Hoffberg's posting gives a segue for an important discussion:
>
> >Visual Icons, an exhibiton of book art featuring the works of....
>
> uses the singular form, in contrast to Barbara Korb's exhibition notice:
>
> >Metamorphosis: Contemporary Forms in Book Arts
>
> [Note that the following opinion does not reflect on the Content of these
shows
> or the artists in them-- it is a discussion of nomenclature]
>
> For the last few years I have been dropping the final "s" in descriptions
of art
> activity in our field. This is to distance it from "arts & crafts" and
> "industrial arts." During the last week I had several occasions to mention
this
> in private correspondence, and now would like to open this thread up to
the
> list.
>
> This is a distinction that is important to the consideration of the work
as Art.
> I refer to The Book Art Movement, and to an exhibition of Book Art.  A few
years
> ago I asked the CBA's then Executive Director Peter Smith to propose to
the
> Board that the organization drop the final "s" and become The Center for
Book
> Art. His view was that The Center for Book Arts has classes and workshops
in the
> crafts of bookmaking, as well as presenting exhibitions of Book Art, and
there
> the plural form is appropriate. That is a reasonable argument.
>
> The website for the exhibition Judith announced does not use the phrase
Book
> Art, but says "This is an exhibit of  one-of-a-kind-artist-made books...."
>
> I am curious what other listmembers think about this.
>
> 1. Does the term "Book Arts" provincialize our work?
> 2. Does it limit the recognition or consideration of the work?
> 3. Does it impose a low financial value on the work, compared to other art
> forms?
> 4. Is "Book Art" any better? Is a phrase like "one-of-a-kind-artist-made
books"
> a better solution, even though it is awkward?
> 5. Do we need a concept like "Book Art Movement" to position the field?
Is it
> in fact a movement?
> 6. If so, is Ulises Carrion's _The New Art of Making Books_ the Manifesto?
If
> not that, then what?
> 7. Is it just my point of view as a geezer, or has anyone else noticed
that a
> lot of "Book Arts" stuff being done today looks like it came from a
Hallmark
> Gift Shoppe? Does this indicate the popularization of the field among the
Mall
> crowd? Is it due to the recent plethora of Bookbinding "craft project"
books?
>
> --
>
>  Richard
>  http://www.minsky.com
>  http://www.centerforbookarts.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 15:42:51 -0700
> From:    Meg Miller <thlber@PACBELL.NET>
> Subject: Montefiascone Summer program report
>
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>
> Just a brief note to those of you interested in medieval/Ren books
> and binding: if you possibly can make it to any or all of the
> Montefiascone summer program, YOU MUST. I could only go for a week,
> to the "Making of a 15th century book" class, and it was FABULOUS.
> Not only did we build models of 15th century English books with some
> excellent teachers/conservators, doing virtually all of the work with
> period-style tools, but we were also able to study some real 15th
> bindings up close -- a real treat for those of us without rare books
> collections to work in! The food was great, living was darned near
> free (I spent less than $600 for the course, food and lodging for the
> whole week) and all the people involved were wonderful to work with.
> When we weren't working on our books or looking at slides or real
> books, we had the lovely medieval town of Montefiascone to explore,
> Lake Bolsena to swim in, and plenty of the local wine to drink! (Wine
> was more expensive than water, but only a little -- most bottles of
> the local stuff, QUITE drinkable, were about $2.) I hear from those
> who took the other two courses, Medieval Atlases, and Pigments on the
> Medieval Palette, that these were also marvelous. The money you spend
> on tuition is almost all used to fund the conservation project on the
> local seminary library, which dates from 1660 and has books much
> older than that, and which was allowed to fall to absolute ruin until
> fairly recently.
>
> I'd be happy to give a more blow-by-blow account to anyone who's
> interested (I'm already making plans to go back in '03) but didn't
> want to bore the entire list.
>
> Meg Miller
> thlber@pacbell.net
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 19:32:58 -0400
> From:    "Peter D. Verheyen" <verheyen@PHILOBIBLON.COM>
> Subject: Re: Book Art vs. Book Arts
>
>              ***********************************************
>            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
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>
> What's wrong with the arts and crafts movement. The book arts are an art
> form, as well as a craft. Once the craft is lost, and we are heading that
> way, the art goes too. As I look at what is being created under the
> umbrella of book arts, I see many art forms, not just one. At the same
> time, the definition of book is being stretched ad absurdum.
>
> I think this is silly and absurd, like much of todays PC language. What is
> it really trying to say. Why not say "unique artist's books," or  "unique
> books"? ACK!
>
> >The website for the exhibition Judith announced does not use the phrase
Book
> >Art, but says "This is an exhibit of  one-of-a-kind-artist-made
books...."
> >
> >I am curious what other listmembers think about this.
>
> Not really. I think more people might ask, "where's the book in the art?"
> Also some of the work may be provincial, traditional and non-traditional
> alike. Does sameness = provincial?
>
> >1. Does the term "Book Arts" provincialize our work?
>
> Why would it? We are making whatever we consider "books," and trying to
> call it "art," or is it the other way around? ;>
>
> >2. Does it limit the recognition or consideration of the work?
>
> I think that has more to do with the relatively low esteem books are held
> in, in our culture. I think we are also our own worst enemies in terms of
> financial value, with some very nicely done editioned works selling for
> less than many tradebooks. Look at the prices some are charging for their
> "journals." The materials +  time could easily exceed sale price. I would
> say that in most cases we are dragging ourselves down. We need to
> continually educate our public (whatever that may be), provide them with
> the highest quality work for their $$$, and stop selling ourselves short.
> This may result in a selection/weeding out process among "artists," but
> hopefully the best will survive, and thrive in a more educated
marketplace.
>
> >3. Does it impose a low financial value on the work, compared to other
art
> >forms?
>
> See comment at beginning. I would certainly prefer "Book Art," but then
> might we not need to define "book" and "art?" (Again?!?!?!?)
>
> >4. Is "Book Art" any better? Is a phrase like "one-of-a-kind-artist-made
> >books"
> >a better solution, even though it is awkward?
>
> Depends on we pigeonhole things. Which of many "Book Art Movements" are we
> referring to? What kinds of "things" are we talking about. Many works
> described as "artist's books" seem less than creative entities;
paralleling
> a similar situation in which "traditional" 1/4 leather books with marbled
> sides try to be fine/design bindings. With that I mean to say that they
> have become equally trite and pedestrian.  They may be skillfully executed
> craft, but not fine/design bindings. I'm exaggerating a bit, but you get
> the drift.
>
> >5. Do we need a concept like "Book Art Movement" to position the field?
Is it
> >in fact a movement?
>
> Not familiar with it, but perhaps need to be, quickly.
>
> >6. If so, is Ulises Carrion's _The New Art of Making Books_ the
Manifesto? If
> >not that, then what?
>
> See #5. It's a sameness propagated by all the new "manuals" coming out,
and
> a general simplification necessitated by todays "instant gratification"
> insanity where everyone can learn to make a book, easily with no muss, no
> fuss. This is the same world in which we expect to find everything online,
> and free. Of course on reflection much could be said of all the
traditional
> bookbinding manuals, many of the classics of which in contrast were
> directed at the trades. Then again, I don't remember seeing these passing
> of the result as art, but as craft.
>
> >7. Is it just my point of view as a geezer, or has anyone else noticed
that a
> >lot of "Book Arts" stuff being done today looks like it came from a
Hallmark
> >Gift Shoppe? Does this indicate the popularization of the field among the
Mall
> >crowd? Is it due to the recent plethora of Bookbinding "craft project"
books?
> >--
> >  Richard
>
> Peter
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
> Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
> Peter D. Verheyen
> <mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
> <http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 20:11:49 EDT
> From:    Patricia Grass <PAGrass@AOL.COM>
> Subject: Re: Book Art vs. Book Arts
>
>              ***********************************************
>            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
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>
> One problem we have run into with the name Book Arts is that we get many
> inquiries from illustrators or others who think we are a group for
> illustrators who do art in books.  Using Book Art instead of Book Arts may
> compound this.
>
> There was a time when a well educated young man or woman knew how to draw
and
> use watercolor and may have keep a pictorial journal of their grand trip
to
> Europe but they never lived under the impression that they were great
> artists. Their experience with drawing prepared them to be the client of
the
> great artist.  Hardly anyone is taught drawing anymore--an audience has
been
> lost. I hate to see an elitism develop in book art especially to the point
> where we put down the hobbyist so much that they no longer practice book
> making and never develop and interest in nor an eye for the piece of book
art
> we may wish them to someday buy.
>
> Patricia Grass
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 20:56:34 -0400
> From:    Kristy Higby <Kristy_Higby@MERCERSBURG.EDU>
> Subject: Re: Sewing Frame
>
>              ***********************************************
>            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
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>
> Thanks for the tip but it's too rich for my blood. It does look like the =
> picture of efficiency.
>
> Kristy
>
> >>> verheyen@PHILOBIBLON.COM - 8/23/01 1:52 PM >>>
>              ***********************************************
>            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
>      the digest) for instructions on searching the archive, setting
>                   your list options,and unsubscribing.
>              ***********************************************
>
> Depending on your budget, the best one around is Tim Ely's. You can see it
> with purchasing info at <http://www.philobiblon.com/probono.htm>. I have
> one and love. It's easy to set up, adjust, and looks just too cool.
>
> Peter
>
> >I'm looking for a canterlevered sewing frame. Does anyone have one they'd
=
> =3D
> >like to sell? Thank you, Kristy
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
> Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
> Peter D. Verheyen
> <mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
> <http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         To unsubscribe, type the following into the message body:
>                             UNSUB Book_Arts-L
>                         COMMAND MUST BE SENT TO:
>                         LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
>              ***********************************************
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 23 Aug 2001 22:01:50 -0400
> From:    "Peter D. Verheyen" <verheyen@PHILOBIBLON.COM>
> Subject: Re: Book Art vs. Book Arts
>
>              ***********************************************
>            See footer at the bottom of this message (or top of
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>              ***********************************************
>
> I don't think this was about putting down the hobbyist at all, or being
> "elitist."
>
> How do we define "elitism" and why is it considered such a negative term
by
> some. I don't think this necessarily about "putting down the hobbyist" but
> more about an aiming for higher standards for everyone. I know of plenty
of
> "hobbyists" or amateur binders who take their work VERY seriously and
> strive to be the best they can. It really doesn't take more effort than
> just (for exaggeration) muddling by, or does it?
>
> However, once we consider selling / exhibiting our work, at whatever
level,
> we are elevating ourselves (whether we like it, or not) to a more
> "professional" level. At that point we are holding ourselves out as
> representatives of the craft, and role models for those interested in
> learning about our field. We need to put our absolute best foot forward
and
> show how it can/should be done (and I'm not talking traditional vs. non).
A
> very simple structure can be done elegantly, or not... By doing that we
> will attract more people to the craft/art.
>
> Those attracted to our craft/art will also, hopefully, be critical and
> demanding in deciding what appeals to them. At the same time, we also need
> to be much more critical of our own work. That means realizing that not
> everything we create is good, and being able to learn from our mistakes.
We
> also need to resist the temptation to "dumb down" what we do, and how we
do
> it. We need critical teachers which I mean in the good sense. By this I
> mean the need for feedback, good and bad, as long as it's constructive.
> Only then can we move forward and show what this craft/art/whatever can
> really do.
>
> p.
>
> >I hate to see an elitism develop in book art especially to the point
> >where we put down the hobbyist so much that they no longer practice book
> >making and never develop and interest in nor an eye for the piece of book
art
> >we may wish them to someday buy.
> >
> >Patricia Grass
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
> Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
> Peter D. Verheyen
> <mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
> <http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 22 Aug 2001 to 23 Aug 2001 (#2001-225)
> ******************************************************************

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