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Re: [BKARTS] BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 23 Jun 2002 to 24 Jun 2002 (#2002-173)



Re: Visiting Washington, DC.
Don't miss the Folklife Festival - on the National Mall.
Many papermakers, and more than 350 other artists from all along the
historic Silk Road.  Festival is daily from June 26 to June 31 and July 3rd
to July 7th.  It is spectacular!  I have been working there for a few days
in the textile section and it's is not to be missed.
They have a web site -   http://www.silkroadproject.org
Enjoy!
Karen O. Brown
Artist, Designer, Teacher and Exhibitions Coordinator
Washington, DC  20009
ph: 202-483-6507

----- Original Message -----
From: "Automatic digest processor" <LISTSERV@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
To: "Recipients of BOOK_ARTS-L digests" <BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2002 12:02 AM
Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 23 Jun 2002 to 24 Jun 2002 (#2002-173)


> There are 11 messages totalling 522 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Visiting D.C.
>   2. Split box corner repair? (2)
>   3. The Chosen Bookish Quote
>   4. Last Chance - Call for Entries
>   5. The fairy dust of adhesive lay-flat bindings-Strength Testing?
>   6. Workshops in Indiana/Chgo/Indpls-Summer (2)
>   7. Woven and Interlocking Books Structures
>   8. Advice concerning Nylon Gossamer (2)
>
>              ***********************************************
>             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
>       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
>             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
>                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>
>         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
>                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
>              ***********************************************
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 09:30:13 -0400
> From:    LawrenceFine <vze2fhm5@VERIZON.NET>
> Subject: Re: Visiting D.C.
>
> You might also want to check out what's going on at Pyramid Atlantic,
> which is about 20 minutes North of Washington by car.  They are online.
> Jamie Fine
>
> Scraps of Art Studio wrote:
>
> > Consider visiting the National Museum of Women in the Arts. They
> > frequently have book art exhibits in their library. I am not sure what
> > is going on right now... but you can check their Web site.
> > http://www.nmwa.org/
> >
> > On Friday, June 21, 2002, at 08:39 AM, Julia DeHoff wrote:
> >
> > > I'll be in the D.C. area around the first of July.
> > > Does anyone know of places/events of special interest
> > > to a calligrapher and fan of handmade books? Thanks.
> > > Julia DeHoff
> > >
> > > __________________________________________________
> > > Do You Yahoo!?
> > > Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup
> > > http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com
> > >
> > >              ***********************************************
> > >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> > >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> > >             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> > >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> > >
> > >         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
> > >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
> > >              ***********************************************
> > >
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> >             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >
> >         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
> >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
> >              ***********************************************
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 09:48:52 -0400
> From:    Norman Sasowsky <norsky@UDEL.EDU>
> Subject: Split box corner repair?
>
> I have a 8 X 10" box, fine linen cloth, that has split one corner almost
> down to the bottom. I did not make the box and it is necessary to retain
> the original box. I'd appreciate any suggestions for repairing the
> damage. The corner edge is 1-1/4" and the split is about an inch long.
> It's a clean tear. Please reply off line. Thank you. Norman
> --
>
> Visit my updated site (Portraits, 2000's) and Bookmark the new address:
> http://seurat.art.udel.edu/Art/Faculty/Norsky/norskyHP.htm
> Norman Sasowsky - Five Decades of Paintings and Artist's Books
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 11:48:56 -0400
> From:    John Cutrone <jcutrone@FAU.EDU>
> Subject: The Chosen Bookish Quote
>
> Original Message:
> Maybe I missed it but I don't recall John Cutrone of Red Wagon Bookworks
> tellling us which quote he finally chose for his letterpress broadside. My
> apologies if I missed it but I'm still curious, John.
>
> Regards,
> Ken
>
> ~~~~~~
>
> Ahhh, yes, the Bookish Quote. No, Ken, you did not miss it. Some projects
> are blessed, and then there are those that fight you tooth and nail. This
> one's been a fighter. To refresh the memories of those who are interested,
> in April we put out a request to both the Book Arts List and the
> Letterpress List for bookish quotes, as we were trying to put together a
> nice broadside to mark the occasion of a visit by the Fontaneda Society (a
> South Florida bibliophile group) to our press in Lake Worth, Florida.
>
> Well, we chose a quote, but did not announce it so as not to jinx the
> project (so much for that idea!) Seth carved a linoleum cut, I set type,
> and the Fontaneda Society came and went. Each member printed a souvenir
> broadside on our Vandercook, but it was a broadside-in-progress, as we
were
> not yet satisfied with some design aspects. Then we experienced some
> "technical difficulties" with crumbling linoleum and had to have a plate
> made from our best print. Still more design issues came into play. And
> we're still working at this one, but, hopefully, will have a finished
> broadside available by early July. You all will be the first to know.
>
> Meanwhile, there seems to be no point in keeping the chosen quote under
> wraps at this point. I doubt we can jinx ourselves much worse than we've
> managed so far. The chosen quote was delivered by...
>
>         Kay Moller
>         of the University of Colorado at Boulder
>
> It's a quote by Groucho Marx: "I find television very educational. Every
> time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book."
>
> A hearty thanks to all who supplied bookish quotes. They were all very
much
> appreciated. Kay's was exactly what we were looking for: something,
well...
> silly. Kay will receive a few broadsides for supplying the quote we used,
> when we're done printing them, of course. We'll post the finished
broadside
> to our webpage as soon as the edition is complete, and we'll have them
> available for sale as well. I'll post a message when everything's done.
>
>
> John, for both John Cutrone and Seth Thompson
> Red Wagon Bookworks
> http://www.redwagonbookworks.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 14:22:00 -0500
> From:    Kara Sjoblom <KSJOBLOM@SBCGLOBAL.NET>
> Subject: Last Chance - Call for Entries
>
> Hi All,
>
> Just a reminder: The deadline for entries to
> participate in the Book Arts Jam in Los Altos, CA is
> June 30, 2002.  You can download an application at
> http://www.sfbookarts.com by clicking on the BABA logo.
>
> The Jam will take place on Saturday, October 12 at
> Foothill College. It will be an Open Studio type
> environment (you can show and/or sell) and there will
> be about 60 tables available. We are looking for those
> who make handmade books, letterpress printed books and
> broadsides, zines, original artist prints and
> multiples. There's more info. on the website listed
> above.
>
> If you're in the vicinity, please consider
> participating - it's going to be a great event!
>
> Kara Sjoblom
>
> http://www.sfbookarts.com
> http://www.bayimages.net
> http://www.karonimo.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 12:40:07 -0700
> From:    Ben Wiens <ben@BENWIENS.COM>
> Subject: The fairy dust of adhesive lay-flat bindings-Strength Testing?
>
> OOPS I TORE OUT ONE OF YOUR PAGES!
> I went on a bicycling overnight outing to beautiful Gabriola Island BC
> Canada with a club I belong to and brought along the double-fan adhesive
> lay-flat test book I made. I passed it around to get some more
impressions.
> Lot's of people said that they dislike typical mouse-trap books. One
person
> described how he uses different fingers of one hand to keep the book open
> while he reads and eats supper. Most liked the idea of a lay-flat book.
Then
> one of the really tall strong guys in the group tore out one of the pages
> unintentionally while playing with the book. I realized some more testing
> had to be done. I had not done a "Corner Pull Test". As soon as I got
home,
> I did some Corner Pull Tests and found that my PVA adhesive bound lay-flat
> book only required 0.15 lbs force to tear out a page with the Corner Pull
> Test while the stapled, polyurethane, and thermal hot melt bound books all
> pulled 1.3 lbs. My PVA adhesive bound lay-flat book had scored well on a
> Page Pull Test  and other folding tests but was utterly weak on the Corner
> Pull Test.
>
> DESTRUCTIVE AND NON DESTRUCTIVE BOOK TESTS
> I decided to make a list of different book tests in case I had missed
some.
> Some of these tests are destructive in which case a book will be destroyed
> while testing, which can be used to evaluate the binding design of books
> before producing them. Some tests are non destructive which can be used to
> evaluate books from the production line without destroying them. Probably
> only the minimum page pull test is non destructive:
>
>    1. Page Pull Test...leaf is pulled with uniform force along its entire
> length
>    2. Subway Test...book doubled back so covers touch
>    3. Page Flex Test...bending individual page in book 45 degrees
repeatedly
>    4. Tumbling Drum Test...tumbling finished book in rotating drum
>    5. Corner Pull Test...pulling page at upper or lower corner only
>    6. Tearing Resistance Test...strength of paper with tear started
>    7. Folding Endurance Test...bending individual paper sheet repeatedly
>    8. Aging Test...determine breakdown of book materials
>    9. Whip Test*...book is whipped open and closed rapidly
>    10. Mull Strength Test*...open book is pulled at upper or lower edge
till
> mull tears
>    11. Cover Hinge Test*...open book is pulled at upper or lower edge till
> hinge tears
>    12. Paper Tensile Strength...pulling necked down paper sample with and
> against the grain
>    13. Paper Stiffness Test...determining how easily paper bends and in
> different directions
>    14. Paper Crushing Test...see how well pages and cover stock can resist
> bending without creasing permanently
>
> *not typical presently
>
> PAGE PULL TESTS
> Here are some page pull tests I did recently which I listed in a previous
> message. I used a page pull tester made with a slot in the board and an
> inverted pant hanger. I only made the books marked with an asterisk*. The
> other books are commercially made. My PVA adhesive bound books did use
> fairly tight weave bookbinding mull.
>
>    1. Hot melt adhesive, Thermal Binding, noncoated paper, Page pull
> average=6.3 lbs/inch
>    2. Polyurethane adhesive, Clamped at spine single application,
noncoated
> paper, Page pull average=3.2 lbs/inch
>    3. PVA adhesive, Double fan single application, nondiluted,  noncoated
> paper, Page pull average=2.54 lbs/inch*
>    4. PVA adhesive, Clamped at spine single application, nondiluted,
> noncoated paper, Page pull average=2.2 lbs/inch*
>    5. Polyurethane adhesive, Clamped at spine single application, coated
> paper, Page pull average=2.09 lbs/inch
>    6. Hot melt adhesive, Typical perfect bound, noncoated paper, Page pull
> average=1.9 lbs/inch
>
> PAPER TENSILE STRENGTH
> I made a test strip with necked down area of 0.25 inches wide. Stapled
> cardboard tabs with punched holes to each end. Paper is 0.004 inches
thick.
> Applied force with jug filled with water till the paper tore. Calculated
the
> combined mass of jug and water.
>
>    1. Office Depot multipurpose paper long grain=7400 psi=29.6 lbs/inch
>    2. Office Depot multipurpose paper cross grain=3557 psi=14.2 lbs/inch
>
> CORNER PULL TESTS
> In my corner pull tests I marked a 15 deg angle across one page. I stapled
a
> cardboard tab with punched hole onto the upper corner of the preceding
page
> which I pulled at the 15 degree angle till it tore visibly. Usually when
the
> tear started it spread quickly. All the books had non coated paper in the
> 20/50 lb range.
>
>    1. Hot melt adhesive, Thermal Binding, noncoated paper, Corner pull
> average=1.3 lbs
>    2. Polyurethane adhesive, Clamped at spine single application,
noncoated
> paper, Corner pull average=1.3 lbs
>    3. Folded stapled sheets, noncoated paper, Corner pull average=1.3 lbs
>    4. Vinyl repair cold adhesive, Clamped at spine single application,
> nondiluted,
> noncoated paper, Page pull average=0.90 lbs
>    5. Sewn signatures, noncoated paper, Corner pull average=0.75 lbs
>    6. Hot melt adhesive, Typical perfect bound, noncoated paper, Corner
pull
> average=0.67 lbs
>    7. PVA bookbinding adhesive, Double fan single application, nondiluted,
> noncoated
> paper, Corner pull average=0.15 lbs
>
> CONCLUSIONS
>    1. The PVA adhesive double-fanned lay-flat test book I made did well in
> the Subway Test, the Whip Test, the Page Pull Test, but failed miserably
in
> the Corner Pull Test.
>    2. In a strong adhesive 8.5 x 11 inch size bound book, it would take 70
> lbs force to tear out a page with the Page Pull Test, but only 1.3 lbs in
> the Corner Pull Test. Any book is weakest in corner tearing.
>    3. Corner tearing strength does not seem to be related to the page pull
> strength.
>    4. In my opinion, corner tearing strength should be one of the most
> important tests in destructive testing at least.
>    5. The sewn binding is actually weaker in corner tearing strength than
> many of the better adhesive bound books as the load is placed on a single
> thread in a tiny hole which easily cuts into and tears a page.
>    6. Some adhesive bound books are 50% as strong in the Page Pull Test as
> the tensile strength of paper. Actually in tearing tests of these strong
> adhesive bound books, the paper does often tear as well as the adhesive
used
> in binding due to the variable nature of the forces involved in a book
> compared to a test strip.
>    7. Either PVA is a very weak adhesive compared to other adhesives in
> terms of corner pull strength, or the PVA I received recently is very poor
> quality or defective. Either way it is what the bookbinder is using at the
> moment as well. A test strip of this PVA is very flexible and reasonably
> strong.
>
> QUESTIONS
>    1. If you have seen or done corner pull tests with PVA and other
> adhesives, I would appreciate seeing the results.
>    2. Corner Pull Tests are not mentioned very much or done it appears.
Why
> is this? It appears to be an important test.
>
> Ben Wiens...applied energy scientist
> Ben Wiens Energy Science Inc.
> 8-1200 Brunette Ave. Coquitlam BC Canada V3K1G3
> E-mail: ben@benwiens.com
> Energy Website: www.benwiens.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 14:50:00 -0500
> From:    Bruce Levy <levybooks@EMAIL.COM>
> Subject: Re: Split box corner repair?
>
> I would carefully lift the cloth all around the break.  Using a hypodermic
needle with pva, I would try to force a small bead of glue between the two
edges.  Rig something to act as a clamp to hold in place (like wrapped gauze
with pelon as a barrier to the glue).  When dry, paste layers of japanese
tissue to give a strong mend.  When dry, re-apply the cloth flaps, and again
a thin strip/s of japanese paper to give a look ofcontinuation to the cloth.
Pigment repairs with acrylic pigment, or your choice of pigment. You may
have to fiddle to give the final pigment a finish similar to the cloth
(sometimes 400 or 6oo wet or dry sandpaper can abrade the pigment to make it
almost invisible.  This is one way.  Pay attention to any glue that appaears
on the inside of the box- wipe it away.
>
> Bruce levy
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Norman Sasowsky <norsky@UDEL.EDU>
> Date:         Mon, 24 Jun 2002 09:48:52 -0400
> To: BOOK_ARTS-L@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU
> Subject:      [BKARTS] Split box corner repair?
>
>
> > I have a 8 X 10" box, fine linen cloth, that has split one corner almost
> > down to the bottom. I did not make the box and it is necessary to retain
> > the original box. I'd appreciate any suggestions for repairing the
> > damage. The corner edge is 1-1/4" and the split is about an inch long.
> > It's a clean tear. Please reply off line. Thank you. Norman
> > --
> >
> > Visit my updated site (Portraits, 2000's) and Bookmark the new address:
> > http://seurat.art.udel.edu/Art/Faculty/Norsky/norskyHP.htm
> > Norman Sasowsky - Five Decades of Paintings and Artist's Books
> >
> >              ***********************************************
> >             BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> >       For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> >             resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> >                       <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >
> >         Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
> >                     <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
> >              ***********************************************
> >
> >
>
> --
> __________________________________________________________
> Sign-up for your own FREE Personalized E-mail at Mail.com
> http://www.mail.com/?sr=signup
>
> Save up to $160 by signing up for NetZero Platinum Internet service.
> http://www.netzero.net/?refcd=N2P0602NEP8
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 16:10:20 -0500
> From:    Daniel Weinberg <dswlog@HOTMAIL.COM>
> Subject: Workshops in Indiana/Chgo/Indpls-Summer
>
> I am in Northwest Indiana now.  Does anyone know of a book repair/bindery
> workshop.  The GPL has many archival materials from the Indiana Room that
> need work.
>   Thank you very much.
>
> Daniel S. Weinberg
> Tech. Services
> Cataloger
> Gary Public Library
> 220 W. Fifth Ave.
> Gary, IN 46402
> (219)886-2484 X333
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos:
> http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 18:21:50 -0400
> From:    Susan Lightcap <slightcap@MINDSPRING.COM>
> Subject: Re: Workshops in Indiana/Chgo/Indpls-Summer
>
> Contact the Etherington Conservation Center in Greensboro, NC:  Toll
Free--
> 877 391-1317.  Also, online:  www.donetherington.com
>
> We handle special collections for public libraries.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 20:05:49 -0400
> From:    "Peter D. Verheyen" <verheyen@PHILOBIBLON.COM>
> Subject: Re: Woven and Interlocking Books Structures
>
> Just received my copies of this book, and have to say it's a must have for
> any bookbinder/book artist who admires the work of Claire Van Vliet, and
> the other presses in the book.
>
> The diagrams are designed for making 4x5" models and very clear.
>
> A very good deal at any price/
>
> Peter
>
>
> >Claire Van Vliet and Elizabeth Steiner have just published a new book
> >entitled Woven and Interlocking Books Structures. It includes complete
> >step-by-step directions for making 4 x 5 inch models of 15 different book
> >structures from the Janus, Steiner and Gefn Presses. The book is 144
pages,
> >7 x 10 inches, and sewn with a paper cover. It is available for $35
> >(includes shipping) from Janus/Gefn Unlimited, 101 Schoolhouse Road,
> >Newark, VT 05871.
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Philobiblon: Book Arts, Different By Design
> Hand Binding, Conservation, and Project Websites
> Peter D. Verheyen
> <mailto:verheyen@philobiblon.com>
> <http://www.philobiblon.com/philobiblon>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 25 Jun 2002 11:31:45 +1000
> From:    Peter Krantz <antiquebooks@OZEMAIL.COM.AU>
> Subject: Advice concerning Nylon Gossamer
>
> Greetings to the List.
>
> We have acquired a few rolls of Nylon Gossamer from a collection of a
> retired conservator.
>
> We should like to consider using it to strengthen weak paper.  For
> instance, at present, we are working on an early C19th folio French
> Atlas.  There is considerable water damage, mould and tidal staining to
> the bottom half of most leaves.  The paper is rag or cotton, (we are not
> sure which).  The weight of the paper is heavy, as is usual with the old
> Atlases.  However, due to this water damage, the paper has lost much of
> its strength, and needs laminating to remain firm.  Normally, we use
> fine Japanese paper to strengthen such areas.
>
> However, we should like to consider the use of this Nylon Gossamer.
>
> Our question is this:  What is the appropriate adhesive, or blend of
> adhesives, to use with Nylon Gossamer?
>
> We would be happy to receive the benefit of your experience!
>
>
> Peter Krantz
>
> ***********************************************
> Book Restorations.
> Sydney,
> Australia.
> antiquebooks@ozemail.com.au
>
> Established 1976
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 24 Jun 2002 22:42:42 EDT
> From:    William Minter <WMNTR@AOL.COM>
> Subject: Re: Advice concerning Nylon Gossamer
>
> In a message dated 6/24/02 9:31:58 PM, antiquebooks@OZEMAIL.COM.AU writes:
>
> <<<  However, due to this water damage, the paper has lost much of
>
> its strength, and needs laminating to remain firm.  Normally, we use
>
> fine Japanese paper to strengthen such areas.
>
> However, we should like to consider the use of this Nylon Gossamer.>>>
>
> Peter,
> I would not use Nylon Gossamer, as --- if memory serves me right --- its
long
> term strength was questioned within a few years of its introduction.
> I have had some experience with just this type of problem. I had
considered a
> very thin Japanese tissue and a very dilute wheat starch paste for a
similar
> project, but realized that I was still going to add too much bulk to that
> area for the book. The entire book with over 150 leaves was mold damaged
in
> the lower right corner -- almost 1/4 of each page was affected.
> The solution was Leaf Casting, and it was FANTASTIC! A small amount of
pulp
> was drawn into the mold damaged area, and with a sizing of
methylcellulose,
> the pages had most, if not all, of their original strength. The overall
> handling of the paper was not hindered by the treatment and there was no
> extra bulk. Actually, we did a partial Cast on both sides of each leaf
> because there was text to contend with -- we did not want to cover any
text
> with the casting.
> In discussing this treatment with fellow conservators, I learned that they
> too have used Leaf Casting as a means of restoring strength to mold
damaged
> paper.
> Ideally, I should be able to have you check my website for the Before and
> After, but, unfortunately, I do not have a site (Dark Ages?). I only have
> slides of Before and After. If you are interested, I could get the slides
> transferred to a disk.
> I might add that I have a Leaf Caster that sees limited use. I have
> considered offering Leaf Casting as a service to fellow binders who do not
> have this worthwhile machine.
> Good Luck.
>
> Bill Minter
> William Minter Bookbinding & Conservation, Inc.
> 4364 Woodbury Pike
> Woodbury, PA   16695
> 814-793-4020
> fax 814-793-4045
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 23 Jun 2002 to 24 Jun 2002 (#2002-173)
> ******************************************************************

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


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