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Re: [BKARTS] guillotine cutters



Katie --

I really dislike the new electrical models.  i like the older challenge
type cutters because you can really position things and you can stop at
any point and reposition.  it's the simplicity that i think is so great.
and the fact that everything is open and right there to see while it's
happening. (granted i've had more experience with the older cutters, and
have a love of machines that work without electricity)

so -- if you ever do get your new model and need a home for the old cutter
i would volunteer in a heartbeat!  <wink> <smile>

- kbk

> Sorry, but I must weigh in on this business of older guillontines. They are
> simple, yes, but they can also be extremely dangerous. Some have a lever arm
> that works with a counter weight, and those weights have been known to
> simply fall off one day, allowing the blade suddenly and unexpectedly fall.
> I use an older Challenge table top model, and it has had some extra safety
> devices added on over the years. Not perfect, but better than nothing. The
> device works well enough when the blade is sharp, but I won't allow anyone
> else to use it until thoroughly trained, and then I still watch and worry.
> If I had the $$ I'd get a newer model in a heartbeat, one that is idiot
> proof!
>
> Katie Harper
>
> on 6/3/03 3:57 PM, Edward Stansell at CraftBook@xxxxxxx wrote:
>
> > I would agree about the mechanical history. It is best to examine them first
> > hand. BUT, here, I speak of power cutters. The old time manually operated
> > paper cutters have very little in the way of mechanism to go wrong or even
> > wear
> > out.  In their operation, they are as simple as a board shear. They have a
> > back
> > guage that operates with a wheel an a worm gear. Their clamps are either foot
> > powered or have a wheel that lowers the clamp when you give it a spin. The
> > knife is brought down with a long cast iron handle which is attached to a
> > counter-weight to bring it back up after the cut is made. You can't get much
> > simpler
> > than that. Ocassionally, someone has abused them. The common problem then is
> > that the adjustment screws in the knife bar are lost or broken off.   Of
> > course
> > no one should buy a pig in a poke. Give a look, kick the tires. If nothing
> > falls off it's probably O.K.
> >
> > Ed S.
> >
> >            ***********************************************
> >           BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
> >     For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
> >           resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
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>
>
>
> Katie Harper
> Ars Brevis Press
> Cincinnati, OH
> 513-233-9588
> http://www.arsbrevispress.com
>
>

             ***********************************************
            BOOK_ARTS-L: The listserv for all the book arts.
      For subscription information, the Archive, and other related
            resources and links go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
                      <http://www.philobiblon.com>

        Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
                    <http://palimpsest.stanford.edu>
             ***********************************************


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