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Re: [BKARTS] Book cover how to



I thought you only had to use use wheat paste and rice paper with book cloth. When you were planning to make some book cloth to use.I don't think the rice paper is needed with wheat pasts and paper? But I could be wrong although I have not used it.
Nes

Nina Kunimoto <nina_kunimoto@xxxxxx> wrote:
Hi! I took a basic book binding course a while back. Looking to make
some books. I need some advice on how to make the book cover. I
purchased some nice paper and rice paper. My teacher said I can just use
paste (flour + water boiled). She put the paste on rice paper, then
misted some water on the cover paper then used a brush to flatten it.

Does anyone else have other ways of doing this?
Thanks. Nina

-----Original Message-----
From: Automatic digest processor [mailto:LISTSERV@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2003 12:01 AM
To: Recipients of BOOK_ARTS-L digests
Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 15 Nov 2003 to 16 Nov 2003 (#2003-315)

There are 10 messages totalling 1409 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Displaying Books
2. An open book
3. BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314) (3)
4. gloves for exhibitions
5. Gold line on bands
6. handling books in exhibitions
7. "Mining the Lloyd Library" Book arts exhibit
8. Bay Area event: Library of Discards

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 08:11:58 EST
From: Zoe Hecht

Subject: Displaying Books

Interestingly I just had the opportunity of visiting a show at Cask
Foundation in Lynbrook, New York (Long Island)
http://www.karenmichel.com/ where I was able to see all the books, or
nearly so, without glass. One of the pleasures of this show was my
being able to
"touch" each and every one and experience them as living words and
pictures. I
took this opportunity seriously, handling each with respect, slowly and
carefully, and it added a dimension to a book arts show I had never
experienced before. The show itself was not large, less than 20 books,
and several were over-sized, 4 feet or so. Each was an artists' book, 6
from a recent publication entitled, "True Colors," and several were
artist's journals, the others were the work of Karen Michel and Carlo
Thertus. All were thought provoking. I am certain that my ability to
touch these books will have a far more lasting impression on me than
other shows because of the nature of my relationship with them. I
remember thinking at the time how I was "one with the book" rather than
outside the book. It would be a thrill to have more shows like this,
and have Centers continue to question how the book arts can be displayed
in a more animated way, the CD, as Roberta recommended just one of
several potential imaginative means to bring the book and the reader
into closer proximity.

Zoe
www.itsmysite.com/parsifalsSister

Zoe
www.itsmysite.com/parsifalssister
'The present moment is the only moment available to us, and it is the
door to all moments.' - Thich Nhat Hanh How we spend our days is, of
course, how we spend our lives - Annie Dillard

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:41:54 -0500
From: Chuck & Julie Basham
Subject: Re: An open book

I am very interested in the discussion about An Open Book. I am the
organizer of this juried show and I came up with this idea because of my
experiences in showing my own books.

I have had very disappointing experiences in seeing how my books have
been displayed in galleries. If I am not able to set up the books
myself, I have come to the gallery - or museum- and seen the books
crowded together on small pedestals, kept in their folios or generally
not shown to their best advantage. Many times when I am at an opening
reception of my work I still see people look at a piece from all angles-
but not touch or open it, even with a sign that urges them to do so- and
say" Oh how nice" but walk away without seeing all that I labored over
inside the covers. I have grown very frustrated with the medium because
of this.

But instead of giving up making books, I have decided to take the
display issue into consideration when creating a book. Luckily it has
not been a problem because the structure and the concept have always
been integral to the whole process and has worked well for me. I have
also made some interesting discoveries and structures while pursuing
this avenue.

I am organizing this show at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland
Ohio, where I am the director, because I love making books and want to
expose others to the medium. We have no budget to speak of though we
have a great space located within the library. My co- director and I
have been brainstorming ideas of how to display the work when we open
the show. We have some very nice glass cases and pedestals. We may
design and build some kind of shelf units to attach to walls. We may
have guided tours, as was suggested, where people, or the tour guides,
can touch the work. BUT, with the concept behind the show, hopefully
your intent as an artist can be fully explored by the
viewer- without interaction, which would need to be overseen by a
gallery crew or security that we don't have.

I thank Roberta, Laurie, Tom and Barbara for their thoughts and
suggestions about how to display books in a gallery setting. They have
put forth some great ideas and I hope that we can incorporate some of
them. But I also hope that artists can take advantage of this idea of an
AN OPEN BOOK and create some fascinating new books.

I hope you continue the discussion because this is an ongoing problem
that should be addressed.

If you would like more information about An Open Book please go to the
website-

Julie Friedman
Director - Gallery West- Western Campus
Cuyahoga Community College
Cleveland, Ohio

Stone Fence Press Book Arts
--

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:07:26 -0800
From: Maureen Eppstein
Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)

At 12:01 AM 11/16/2003 -0500, Roberta wrote:
>In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large
>room full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands
>and basic knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a
>market for book arts could be expanded by socializing people into the
>richly satisfying elements of time and touch that separate books from
>paintings, prints and sculpture - a place of active participation.

Last spring my husband and I curated the show "Betty Storz and Friends:
The Art of the Book" at Mendocino Art Center, Mendocino CA. We gave
exhibitors the option of having their work under glass or available to
be handled. Nearly all were happy to have visitors pick up their books.
We bought a big bundle of cheap white cotton gloves from Light
Impressions
(www.lightimpressionsdirect.com) and arranged them in baskets throughout
the gallery. We also had a few comfortable chairs where people could sit
to browse.

The show was a great success. Visitors commented that they loved putting
on the gloves and they appreciated the chance to spend time quietly
looking through the books.

Maureen Eppstein

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:42:09 -0800
From: Signa Houghteling
Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)

I guess in that setting the white gloves were useful, but the
conservators I know don't like them because they are slippery. Good,
clean hands are the best, they say.

Signa/Judy Houghteling

-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of
Maureen Eppstein
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2003 11:07 AM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)

At 12:01 AM 11/16/2003 -0500, Roberta wrote:
>In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large
>room full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands
>and basic knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a
>market for
book
>arts could be expanded by socializing people into the richly satisfying

>elements of time and touch that separate books from paintings, prints
>and sculpture - a place of active participation.

Last spring my husband and I curated the show "Betty Storz and Friends:
The Art of the Book" at Mendocino Art Center, Mendocino CA. We gave
exhibitors the option of having their work under glass or available to
be handled. Nearly all were happy to have visitors pick up their books.
We bought a big bundle of cheap white cotton gloves from Light
Impressions
(www.lightimpressionsdirect.com) and arranged them in baskets throughout
the gallery. We also had a few comfortable chairs where people could sit
to browse.

The show was a great success. Visitors commented that they loved putting
on the gloves and they appreciated the chance to spend time quietly
looking through the books.

Maureen Eppstein

***********************************************
See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:

*Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & (c)*

Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine

***********************************************

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 12:29:48 -0800
From: Guffey
Subject: gloves for exhibitions

Regarding using gloves for exhibitions, Signa/Judy Houghteling wrote:

> I guess in that setting the white gloves were useful, but the
> conservators
I
> know don't like them because they are slippery. Good, clean hands are

> the best, they say. Signa/Judy Houghteling

Our Book Arts Guild has had two exhibits and have provided gloves for
both of them. I know that others have mentioned that gloves can become
dirty and hence not very useful. What we found by providing the gloves
was that the patron became immediately part of the exhibit just by
putting on the gloves.

Given "permission" now to pick up the books brought much joy and they
felt an interaction with the art they wouldn't have just by looking.
Some books beg to be examined, others (such as an accordion structure)
can sit on a shelf and just be admired. We were very fortunate not to
have damaged books at the end of the month long exhibits and did put
some "under glass" if requested by the artist.

If the book is also for sale and is one-of-a-kind, then handling becomes
a problem. A person who purchases the book during the exhibit has to
agree to leave it until the end of the show. In this case it is
probably not a good idea to have it handled and possibly be damaged.

Obviously, there is no clear cut solution.

d. guffey
North Redwoods Book Arts Guild

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 11:01:14 +1100
From: Peter Krantz
Subject: Re: Gold line on bands

Greetings,

Just a little note to thank all those who answered our question on and
off List. To abbreviate what has been written, the accepted technique is
to blind tool the ridge of the band, and then stretch the foil over the
band. The blind tooling is revealed through the foil, enabling one to
use the pallet or roll with a good degree of accuracy.

Best to all in your work.

Peter Krantz

***********************************************
Book Restorations.
Sydney,
Australia.
Email: restore@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Established 1976

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 19:11:48 -0500
From: Richard Minsky
Subject: handling books in exhibitions

If you like the direct touch clean hands method and not the slippery
gloves that keep you from really touching the work, you can have the
alcohol wipes on hand like you get at the gas station in little foil
packets.
--
Richard
http://minsky.com
http://www.centerforbookarts.org

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 19:40:21 EST
From: Diane Stemper
Subject: "Mining the Lloyd Library" Book arts exhibit

PRESS RELEASE
Date:November 16, 2003

Mining the Lloyd: Book Artists Reveal Secrets and Treasures from the
Lloyd Library and Museum downtown Cincinnati, Ohio

December 1, 2003 - February 28, 2004

Opening Reception and Public Talk: December 5, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. with
Thom Collins, Senior Curator at the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary
Art, Cincinnati and Dr. G. Doug Winget, medical botanist and professor
emeritus
of the University of Cincinnati (Talk will begin at 6:30 p.m.)

An exciting exhibition of artists' books will be on view at the Lloyd
Library this winter. Mining the Lloyd: Book Artists Reveal Secrets and
Treasures from the Lloyd Library and Museum opens December 1, 2003 and
continues through February 28, 2004. The invitational show will feature
book works by contemporary artists of national and regional reputation
along with selected rare and unusual texts from the Lloyd Library and
Museum. Co-curators Diane Stemper and Susan Brumm members of the
Cincinnati Book Arts Society invited eighteen artists to explore the
Lloyd Library's holdings and select a book to investigate and use as
inspiration for creating a new book. Each artist's unique work is a
reinterpretation of the content, theme or scientific treatise of the
Lloyd text they chose. The Lloyd - one of the gems of downtown
Cincinnati - is a science research library specializing in pharmacy,
botany and horticulture. Mining the Lloyd will bring long overdue
attention to the collection and will speak to the natural alliance
between the visual arts, science and creativity. The exhibition was
inspired by similar shows at the Smithsonian Dibner Library and Johns
Hopkins University. Thom Collins, curator at the Rosenthal Center for
Contemporary Art and Dr. G. Doug Winget, medical botanist will conduct a
public talk regarding science and creativity during the opening.

Local artists include Kate Kern (Cincinnati) and the collaborative team
of Holmes and Riordan. Kern's books have been exhibited widely and are
included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The
Getty Research Institute and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
Diana Duncan Holmes and Timothy Riordan (Cincinnati), whose
collaborative artists' books have been exhibited at the Miami University
Art Museum and are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and
The New York Public Library, will display Monkey
Business: A Revised Text inspired by Darwin's The Origin of Species and
The Holy Bible. Nationally-known book artist Carol Barton (Maryland)
will be creating a small edition ABC book of chemical synonyms and trade
names. Barton's work is avidly collected and has been exhibited at the
National Museum of Women in the Arts, The Houston Center for
Contemporary Craft and the Center for Book Arts in New York. Artist
George Gessert (Oregon), also inspired by Origin of Species, will show
his artist's book Origin, Streptocarpus Breeding Project. Gessert's
books are found in major collections and his art and science essays have
been published in The Northwest Review and Art Papers. Additional
artists
include: Beth Brann, Susan Brumm, Jack Campbell, Gabrielle Fox, Rhonda
Gushee, Celene Hawkins, Peg Rhein, Carolyn Whitsel (Cincinnati), Ed
Hutchins (New York), Karen Fuhrman ( Lexington), Rebecca Morton
(Columbus), Ellen Sheffield (Gambier), Diane Stemper (Oxford), and Karen
Wirth (Minneapolis).

The Lloyd Library and Museum, located at 917 Plum Street, downtown
Cincinnati , is a cherished Cincinnati secret. The current collection is
based on a collection started by John Uri in 1864. The publications were
used by the Lloyd Brothers, John Uri, Curtis Gates and Nelson Ashley
Lloyd, and were an integral part of their pharmaceutical manufacturing
business. The Lloyd Brothers established a trust in 1919 that continues
to support the Library's operations. Today, the Lloyd Library and Museum
is recognized worldwide by the scientific community as a vital research
center. Housing thousands of volumes on the subject of pharmacy, botany,
and horticulture, it has a vast collection of scientific texts - many of
which date back hundreds of years. Included in this rare book
collection is an original copy of the ten volume Flora Graeca (1840) by
John Sibthorp, an original copy of Origin of Species (1859) by Charles
Darwin, and Elizabeth's Blackwell's A Curious Herbal (1739).

Along with the funding from the Lloyd Library, the Ohio Arts Council
helped fund this exhibition with an Artists Project Grant. The mission
of the Ohio Arts Council is to build Ohio through the arts and to
encourage economic growth, educational excellence and cultural
enrichment for all Ohioans.

Contact: Susan Brumm,
Cincinnati Book Arts Society
513.321.4449 or brummfound@xxxxxxxxxxxx

Lloyd Library and Museum
917 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
513.721.3707
Open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 17:05:33 -0800
From: Judith Hoffberg
Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)

In 30 years of exhibiting bookworks, I have found that the respect
viewers approach the exhibition is manifest only through the gloves
situation--I have always provided gloves with everyone of my shows and
it has worked. In 30 years, I have lost one book in the United STates
and two books in Australia and New Zealand--not a bad record. There is
that affinity to touch with and without gloves, and with gloves, you
protect the works. Of course, I have always had a table with those
multiples which can be replaced, yet can be perused at length with a
gloved hand or two. Of course, there are those bookworks which should
never be touched--and as such I have used a system of color codings or a
way of having the gallery assistant be asked to turn the pages for the
viewer. I also am present a great deal the first week of any traveling
show and teach the docents (students or those volunteers who want to sit
the show) the stories of each of my bookworks and how to deal with each
for the public. AS such, it has made it much more secure for me to
leave and know that the show is in "good hands" to turn a phrase. I
have been successful in traveling shows because I usually go with the
show, install it, and then interpret it and then teach those who are
securing the gallery how to interpret the show in their own way as well.
Respect is built in in that way.

Barbara Metz has also perfect the way of installing the show by doing a
CD-Rom to show those who will install the show without her to do so the
correct way. CDs are wonderful for a great many reasons. I do recall
the Vollard show at MOMA in 1977 when they used videos to turn the pages
of those precious books which could not be touched by anyone, but where
each and every page of those magnificent books were turned on monitors
for people to appreciate. Then too, those huge bookworks of Ansel
Kiefer were turned by gorgeous turners in every show they appeared--from
MOCA in Los Angeles to everywhere else. Respect is instilled by such
motives. Not bad for a day's work, but it works.

Judith A. Hoffberg
Judith A. Hoffberg
Umbrella
P.O. Box 3640
Santa Monica, CA 90408
http://colophon.com/journal
http://colophon.com/ediblebooks/books2eat2003.html
(310)399-1146, fax: 399-5070
Let a smile be your umbrella!
----- Original Message -----
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To: "Recipients of BOOK_ARTS-L digests"
Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:01 PM
Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)

> There are 14 messages totalling 863 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:

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