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Re: [BKARTS] Book cover how to



Hell why not simple make an interesting book out of this post below. Hot 
damn!

Anybody flamed yet, let me know.

Charles Garland 

                      
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
In a message dated 11/17/03 11:02:47 AM Pacific Standard Time, 
ladybluenes1313@xxxxxxxxx writes:

> I thought you only had to use use wheat paste and rice paper with book 
> cloth. When you were planning to make some book cloth to use.I don't think the 
> rice paper is needed with wheat pasts and paper? But I could be wrong although 
> I have not used it.
> Nes
> 
> Nina Kunimoto <nina_kunimoto@xxxxxx> wrote:
> Hi! I took a basic book binding course a while back. Looking to make
> some books. I need some advice on how to make the book cover. I
> purchased some nice paper and rice paper. My teacher said I can just use
> paste (flour + water boiled). She put the paste on rice paper, then
> misted some water on the cover paper then used a brush to flatten it.
> 
> Does anyone else have other ways of doing this?
> Thanks. Nina
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Automatic digest processor [mailto:LISTSERV@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> Sent: Monday, November 17, 2003 12:01 AM
> To: Recipients of BOOK_ARTS-L digests
> Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 15 Nov 2003 to 16 Nov 2003 (#2003-315)
> 
> 
> There are 10 messages totalling 1409 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
> 1. Displaying Books
> 2. An open book
> 3. BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314) (3)
> 4. gloves for exhibitions
> 5. Gold line on bands
> 6. handling books in exhibitions
> 7. "Mining the Lloyd Library" Book arts exhibit
> 8. Bay Area event: Library of Discards
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 08:11:58 EST
> From: Zoe Hecht
> 
> Subject: Displaying Books
> 
> Interestingly I just had the opportunity of visiting a show at Cask
> Foundation in Lynbrook, New York (Long Island)
> http://www.karenmichel.com/ where I was able to see all the books, or
> nearly so, without glass. One of the pleasures of this show was my
> being able to
> "touch" each and every one and experience them as living words and
> pictures. I
> took this opportunity seriously, handling each with respect, slowly and
> carefully, and it added a dimension to a book arts show I had never
> experienced before. The show itself was not large, less than 20 books,
> and several were over-sized, 4 feet or so. Each was an artists' book, 6
> from a recent publication entitled, "True Colors," and several were
> artist's journals, the others were the work of Karen Michel and Carlo
> Thertus. All were thought provoking. I am certain that my ability to
> touch these books will have a far more lasting impression on me than
> other shows because of the nature of my relationship with them. I
> remember thinking at the time how I was "one with the book" rather than
> outside the book. It would be a thrill to have more shows like this,
> and have Centers continue to question how the book arts can be displayed
> in a more animated way, the CD, as Roberta recommended just one of
> several potential imaginative means to bring the book and the reader
> into closer proximity.
> 
> Zoe
> www.itsmysite.com/parsifalsSister
> 
> 
> 
> Zoe
> www.itsmysite.com/parsifalssister
> 'The present moment is the only moment available to us, and it is the
> door to all moments.' - Thich Nhat Hanh How we spend our days is, of
> course, how we spend our lives - Annie Dillard
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:41:54 -0500
> From: Chuck & Julie Basham
> Subject: Re: An open book
> 
> I am very interested in the discussion about An Open Book. I am the
> organizer of this juried show and I came up with this idea because of my
> experiences in showing my own books.
> 
> I have had very disappointing experiences in seeing how my books have
> been displayed in galleries. If I am not able to set up the books
> myself, I have come to the gallery - or museum- and seen the books
> crowded together on small pedestals, kept in their folios or generally
> not shown to their best advantage. Many times when I am at an opening
> reception of my work I still see people look at a piece from all angles-
> but not touch or open it, even with a sign that urges them to do so- and
> say" Oh how nice" but walk away without seeing all that I labored over
> inside the covers. I have grown very frustrated with the medium because
> of this.
> 
> But instead of giving up making books, I have decided to take the
> display issue into consideration when creating a book. Luckily it has
> not been a problem because the structure and the concept have always
> been integral to the whole process and has worked well for me. I have
> also made some interesting discoveries and structures while pursuing
> this avenue.
> 
> I am organizing this show at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland
> Ohio, where I am the director, because I love making books and want to
> expose others to the medium. We have no budget to speak of though we
> have a great space located within the library. My co- director and I
> have been brainstorming ideas of how to display the work when we open
> the show. We have some very nice glass cases and pedestals. We may
> design and build some kind of shelf units to attach to walls. We may
> have guided tours, as was suggested, where people, or the tour guides,
> can touch the work. BUT, with the concept behind the show, hopefully
> your intent as an artist can be fully explored by the
> viewer- without interaction, which would need to be overseen by a
> gallery crew or security that we don't have.
> 
> I thank Roberta, Laurie, Tom and Barbara for their thoughts and
> suggestions about how to display books in a gallery setting. They have
> put forth some great ideas and I hope that we can incorporate some of
> them. But I also hope that artists can take advantage of this idea of an
> AN OPEN BOOK and create some fascinating new books.
> 
> I hope you continue the discussion because this is an ongoing problem
> that should be addressed.
> 
> If you would like more information about An Open Book please go to the
> website-
> 
> Julie Friedman
> Director - Gallery West- Western Campus
> Cuyahoga Community College
> Cleveland, Ohio
> 
> Stone Fence Press Book Arts
> --
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:07:26 -0800
> From: Maureen Eppstein
> Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)
> 
> At 12:01 AM 11/16/2003 -0500, Roberta wrote:
> >In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large
> >room full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands
> >and basic knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a
> >market for book arts could be expanded by socializing people into the
> >richly satisfying elements of time and touch that separate books from
> >paintings, prints and sculpture - a place of active participation.
> 
> Last spring my husband and I curated the show "Betty Storz and Friends:
> The Art of the Book" at Mendocino Art Center, Mendocino CA. We gave
> exhibitors the option of having their work under glass or available to
> be handled. Nearly all were happy to have visitors pick up their books.
> We bought a big bundle of cheap white cotton gloves from Light
> Impressions
> (www.lightimpressionsdirect.com) and arranged them in baskets throughout
> the gallery. We also had a few comfortable chairs where people could sit
> to browse.
> 
> The show was a great success. Visitors commented that they loved putting
> on the gloves and they appreciated the chance to spend time quietly
> looking through the books.
> 
> Maureen Eppstein
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:42:09 -0800
> From: Signa Houghteling
> Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)
> 
> I guess in that setting the white gloves were useful, but the
> conservators I know don't like them because they are slippery. Good,
> clean hands are the best, they say.
> 
> Signa/Judy Houghteling
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of
> Maureen Eppstein
> Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2003 11:07 AM
> To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)
> 
> 
> At 12:01 AM 11/16/2003 -0500, Roberta wrote:
> >In my version of a perfect world, books would be exhibited in a large
> >room full of comfortable sitting areas and visitors with clean hands
> >and basic knowledge about how to handle the materials. A place where a
> >market for
> book
> >arts could be expanded by socializing people into the richly satisfying
> 
> >elements of time and touch that separate books from paintings, prints
> >and sculpture - a place of active participation.
> 
> Last spring my husband and I curated the show "Betty Storz and Friends:
> The Art of the Book" at Mendocino Art Center, Mendocino CA. We gave
> exhibitors the option of having their work under glass or available to
> be handled. Nearly all were happy to have visitors pick up their books.
> We bought a big bundle of cheap white cotton gloves from Light
> Impressions
> (www.lightimpressionsdirect.com) and arranged them in baskets throughout
> the gallery. We also had a few comfortable chairs where people could sit
> to browse.
> 
> The show was a great success. Visitors commented that they loved putting
> on the gloves and they appreciated the chance to spend time quietly
> looking through the books.
> 
> Maureen Eppstein
> 
> ***********************************************
> See the Book_Arts-L FAQ at:
> 
> *Postings may not be re-printed in any form without the express
> consent of the author - Please respect their contributions & (c)*
> 
> Archive maintained and suppported by Conservation OnLine
> 
> ***********************************************
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 12:29:48 -0800
> From: Guffey
> Subject: gloves for exhibitions
> 
> Regarding using gloves for exhibitions, Signa/Judy Houghteling wrote:
> 
> > I guess in that setting the white gloves were useful, but the
> > conservators
> I
> > know don't like them because they are slippery. Good, clean hands are
> 
> > the best, they say. Signa/Judy Houghteling
> 
> Our Book Arts Guild has had two exhibits and have provided gloves for
> both of them. I know that others have mentioned that gloves can become
> dirty and hence not very useful. What we found by providing the gloves
> was that the patron became immediately part of the exhibit just by
> putting on the gloves.
> 
> Given "permission" now to pick up the books brought much joy and they
> felt an interaction with the art they wouldn't have just by looking.
> Some books beg to be examined, others (such as an accordion structure)
> can sit on a shelf and just be admired. We were very fortunate not to
> have damaged books at the end of the month long exhibits and did put
> some "under glass" if requested by the artist.
> 
> If the book is also for sale and is one-of-a-kind, then handling becomes
> a problem. A person who purchases the book during the exhibit has to
> agree to leave it until the end of the show. In this case it is
> probably not a good idea to have it handled and possibly be damaged.
> 
> Obviously, there is no clear cut solution.
> 
> d. guffey
> North Redwoods Book Arts Guild
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 11:01:14 +1100
> From: Peter Krantz
> Subject: Re: Gold line on bands
> 
> Greetings,
> 
> Just a little note to thank all those who answered our question on and
> off List. To abbreviate what has been written, the accepted technique is
> to blind tool the ridge of the band, and then stretch the foil over the
> band. The blind tooling is revealed through the foil, enabling one to
> use the pallet or roll with a good degree of accuracy.
> 
> 
> Best to all in your work.
> 
> 
> 
> Peter Krantz
> 
> ***********************************************
> Book Restorations.
> Sydney,
> Australia.
> Email: restore@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> 
> Established 1976
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 19:11:48 -0500
> From: Richard Minsky
> Subject: handling books in exhibitions
> 
> If you like the direct touch clean hands method and not the slippery
> gloves that keep you from really touching the work, you can have the
> alcohol wipes on hand like you get at the gas station in little foil
> packets.
> --
> Richard
> http://minsky.com
> http://www.centerforbookarts.org
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 19:40:21 EST
> From: Diane Stemper
> Subject: "Mining the Lloyd Library" Book arts exhibit
> 
> PRESS RELEASE
> Date:November 16, 2003
> 
> Mining the Lloyd: Book Artists Reveal Secrets and Treasures from the
> Lloyd Library and Museum downtown Cincinnati, Ohio
> 
> December 1, 2003 - February 28, 2004
> 
> Opening Reception and Public Talk: December 5, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. with
> Thom Collins, Senior Curator at the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary
> Art, Cincinnati and Dr. G. Doug Winget, medical botanist and professor
> emeritus
> of the University of Cincinnati (Talk will begin at 6:30 p.m.)
> 
> An exciting exhibition of artists' books will be on view at the Lloyd
> Library this winter. Mining the Lloyd: Book Artists Reveal Secrets and
> Treasures from the Lloyd Library and Museum opens December 1, 2003 and
> continues through February 28, 2004. The invitational show will feature
> book works by contemporary artists of national and regional reputation
> along with selected rare and unusual texts from the Lloyd Library and
> Museum. Co-curators Diane Stemper and Susan Brumm members of the
> Cincinnati Book Arts Society invited eighteen artists to explore the
> Lloyd Library's holdings and select a book to investigate and use as
> inspiration for creating a new book. Each artist's unique work is a
> reinterpretation of the content, theme or scientific treatise of the
> Lloyd text they chose. The Lloyd - one of the gems of downtown
> Cincinnati - is a science research library specializing in pharmacy,
> botany and horticulture. Mining the Lloyd will bring long overdue
> attention to the collection and will speak to the natural alliance
> between the visual arts, science and creativity. The exhibition was
> inspired by similar shows at the Smithsonian Dibner Library and Johns
> Hopkins University. Thom Collins, curator at the Rosenthal Center for
> Contemporary Art and Dr. G. Doug Winget, medical botanist will conduct a
> public talk regarding science and creativity during the opening.
> 
> Local artists include Kate Kern (Cincinnati) and the collaborative team
> of Holmes and Riordan. Kern's books have been exhibited widely and are
> included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The
> Getty Research Institute and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.
> Diana Duncan Holmes and Timothy Riordan (Cincinnati), whose
> collaborative artists' books have been exhibited at the Miami University
> Art Museum and are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and
> The New York Public Library, will display Monkey
> Business: A Revised Text inspired by Darwin's The Origin of Species and
> The Holy Bible. Nationally-known book artist Carol Barton (Maryland)
> will be creating a small edition ABC book of chemical synonyms and trade
> names. Barton's work is avidly collected and has been exhibited at the
> National Museum of Women in the Arts, The Houston Center for
> Contemporary Craft and the Center for Book Arts in New York. Artist
> George Gessert (Oregon), also inspired by Origin of Species, will show
> his artist's book Origin, Streptocarpus Breeding Project. Gessert's
> books are found in major collections and his art and science essays have
> been published in The Northwest Review and Art Papers. Additional
> artists
> include: Beth Brann, Susan Brumm, Jack Campbell, Gabrielle Fox, Rhonda
> Gushee, Celene Hawkins, Peg Rhein, Carolyn Whitsel (Cincinnati), Ed
> Hutchins (New York), Karen Fuhrman ( Lexington), Rebecca Morton
> (Columbus), Ellen Sheffield (Gambier), Diane Stemper (Oxford), and Karen
> Wirth (Minneapolis).
> 
> The Lloyd Library and Museum, located at 917 Plum Street, downtown
> Cincinnati , is a cherished Cincinnati secret. The current collection is
> based on a collection started by John Uri in 1864. The publications were
> used by the Lloyd Brothers, John Uri, Curtis Gates and Nelson Ashley
> Lloyd, and were an integral part of their pharmaceutical manufacturing
> business. The Lloyd Brothers established a trust in 1919 that continues
> to support the Library's operations. Today, the Lloyd Library and Museum
> is recognized worldwide by the scientific community as a vital research
> center. Housing thousands of volumes on the subject of pharmacy, botany,
> and horticulture, it has a vast collection of scientific texts - many of
> which date back hundreds of years. Included in this rare book
> collection is an original copy of the ten volume Flora Graeca (1840) by
> John Sibthorp, an original copy of Origin of Species (1859) by Charles
> Darwin, and Elizabeth's Blackwell's A Curious Herbal (1739).
> 
> Along with the funding from the Lloyd Library, the Ohio Arts Council
> helped fund this exhibition with an Artists Project Grant. The mission
> of the Ohio Arts Council is to build Ohio through the arts and to
> encourage economic growth, educational excellence and cultural
> enrichment for all Ohioans.
> 
> Contact: Susan Brumm,
> Cincinnati Book Arts Society
> 513.321.4449 or brummfound@xxxxxxxxxxxx
> 
> Lloyd Library and Museum
> 917 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
> 513.721.3707
> Open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 17:05:33 -0800
> From: Judith Hoffberg
> Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)
> 
> In 30 years of exhibiting bookworks, I have found that the respect
> viewers approach the exhibition is manifest only through the gloves
> situation--I have always provided gloves with everyone of my shows and
> it has worked. In 30 years, I have lost one book in the United STates
> and two books in Australia and New Zealand--not a bad record. There is
> that affinity to touch with and without gloves, and with gloves, you
> protect the works. Of course, I have always had a table with those
> multiples which can be replaced, yet can be perused at length with a
> gloved hand or two. Of course, there are those bookworks which should
> never be touched--and as such I have used a system of color codings or a
> way of having the gallery assistant be asked to turn the pages for the
> viewer. I also am present a great deal the first week of any traveling
> show and teach the docents (students or those volunteers who want to sit
> the show) the stories of each of my bookworks and how to deal with each
> for the public. AS such, it has made it much more secure for me to
> leave and know that the show is in "good hands" to turn a phrase. I
> have been successful in traveling shows because I usually go with the
> show, install it, and then interpret it and then teach those who are
> securing the gallery how to interpret the show in their own way as well.
> Respect is built in in that way.
> 
> Barbara Metz has also perfect the way of installing the show by doing a
> CD-Rom to show those who will install the show without her to do so the
> correct way. CDs are wonderful for a great many reasons. I do recall
> the Vollard show at MOMA in 1977 when they used videos to turn the pages
> of those precious books which could not be touched by anyone, but where
> each and every page of those magnificent books were turned on monitors
> for people to appreciate. Then too, those huge bookworks of Ansel
> Kiefer were turned by gorgeous turners in every show they appeared--from
> MOCA in Los Angeles to everywhere else. Respect is instilled by such
> motives. Not bad for a day's work, but it works.
> 
> Judith A. Hoffberg
> Judith A. Hoffberg
> Umbrella
> P.O. Box 3640
> Santa Monica, CA 90408
> http://colophon.com/journal
> http://colophon.com/ediblebooks/books2eat2003.html
> (310)399-1146, fax: 399-5070
> Let a smile be your umbrella!
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Automatic digest processor"
> 
> To: "Recipients of BOOK_ARTS-L digests"
> Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:01 PM
> Subject: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 14 Nov 2003 to 15 Nov 2003 (#2003-314)
> 
> 
> > There are 14 messages totalling 863 lines in this issue.
> >
> > Topics of the day:
> 
> === message truncated ===
> 
> ---------------------------------
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> 

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