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Re: [BKARTS] Printing for eternity



Why not use plaster of paris, with a fiberglass mat embedded in it
for extra strength?
Then you don't have to fire the clay.

On Tue, 2004-08-10 at 21:09, Timothy Arthur Brown wrote:
> Hi Chris,
>
> Here are a few ideas of my own.  If you're going to use clay tablets
> (not a bad idea), why not make the impressions on them with photopolymer
> printing plates like those that have spurred on the recent renaissance
> of letterpress?  Plates of this sort are likely to give you finer detail
> than a plotter would.  I would also make sure that the entirety of each
> printing plate is slightly depressed into the clay so that there is a
> slightly raised border around the entire impression area.  This will
> protect facing impressions from becoming damaged if the tablets should
> rub against each other over time.  It may also be inadvisable to attempt
> a binding of these tablets -- too much chance of damage or corrosion.
> Better instead to package them on edge in a perfectly sized box of some
> sort.
>
> T. A. Brown
> Franconia, New Hampshire  USA
>
>
> Chris Palmer wrote:
>
> >Thanks for the replies (and I hope there are a few more..)
> >
> >I didn't realise that gold foil pages would sort of weld  together  over
> >time, but I suspect most every other metal will become brittle or corrode
> >over this time scale.
> >
> >I now have the vision of a computer plotter ( the type that makes graphs etc
> >with a pen) scratching letters and simple diagrams with a stylus on clay
> >tiles which are then baked, tiles the thickness of floor tiles should be
> >strong enough to survive the years. Maybe mix in glass fibres in the mud to
> >act as reinforcement??
> >
> >As for language Sumerian and Egyptian were recovered because of the
> >continuity of scholarship over the last 5,000 years, there was never a long
> >enough break and there were enough - just barely - multilingual translation
> >to recover the languages. Think where Egyptology would be without the
> >Rosetta stone. Unless there is a total multi-thousand year dark age it is
> >hard to believe that some scholars somewhere will not be able to read
> >English (or Latin!)
> >
> >Thanks to Kate Gladstone for for the reference to the Long Now, I knew of
> >their web site but had not noticed the 10,000 year library.
> >
> >Thanks to Greg for comments on petroglyphs, but petroglyphs become a bit
> >complicated when the story line is more complicated than "we shot lots of
> >deer here".
> >
> >Chirs
> >
> >----- Original Message -----
> >From: "Jack C. Thompson" <tcl@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
> >To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> >Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2004 5:16 AM
> >Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Printing for eternity
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >>Chris,
> >>
> >>Well, the Dead Sea scrolls do go a ways back, but the scrolls and
> >>scroll fragments are rather small and were written on animal skin
> >>which is subject to many environmental effects.
> >>
> >>You're right about aluminum foil not being a good support, for the
> >>long term; nor is gold foil.
> >>
> >>If the gold foil is pure the pages may well blend into each other over
> >>time; if blended with copper, for instance, or silver, it will become
> >>brittle over time (thousands of years, right?)
> >>
> >>Go back to basics.  Sumerian cuneiform (among the oldest surviving
> >>examples of writing) was inscribed on clay which was then hotted up
> >>and converted into pottery.  It has survived for some 5,000 years.
> >>So far.
> >>
> >>And that brings me to another point.  Sumerian is no longer a widely
> >>read language.
> >>
> >>Why assume that English (or any other modern language) will be understood
> >>some few thousand years hence?
> >>
> >>WAIT!  That gives me an idea.  Make a book of clay tablets where the text
> >>(and illustrations?) consists of binary dots-dashes.
> >>
> >>Hmmnn....
> >>
> >>Jack
> >>
> >>Thompson Conservation Lab.
> >>7549 N. Fenwick
> >>Portland, Oregon  97217
> >>USA
> >>
> >>503/735-3942  (ph/fax)
> >>
> >>http://www.teleport.com/~tcl
> >>
> >>"The lyfe so short; the craft so long to lerne."
> >>Chaucer  _Parlement of Foules_ 1386
> >>
> >>             ***********************************************
> >>
> >>                       Spring[binding]Hath Sprung
> >>         Worldwide Springback Bind-O-Rama and Online Exhibition
> >>            Full information at <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >>                   ENTRY DEADLINE -- September 1, 2004
> >>
> >>      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >>             ***********************************************
> >>
> >>
> >
> >             ***********************************************
> >
> >                       Spring[binding]Hath Sprung
> >         Worldwide Springback Bind-O-Rama and Online Exhibition
> >            Full information at <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >                   ENTRY DEADLINE -- September 1, 2004
> >
> >      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
> >             ***********************************************
> >
> >
> >
>
>              ***********************************************
>
>                        Spring[binding]Hath Sprung
>          Worldwide Springback Bind-O-Rama and Online Exhibition
>             Full information at <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>                    ENTRY DEADLINE -- September 1, 2004
>
>       Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>              ***********************************************

             ***********************************************

                       Spring[binding]Hath Sprung
         Worldwide Springback Bind-O-Rama and Online Exhibition
            Full information at <http://www.philobiblon.com>
                   ENTRY DEADLINE -- September 1, 2004

      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************


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