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Re: [BKARTS] printing for eternity



Hi Dean,

Plastics have not withstood the test of time simply because they have
not existed until recently, and over their relatively brief history the
conservation community has repeatedly discovered man-made polymers once
thought permanent to be unacceptable for archival use.  And, the CD,
originally tauted as an extremely long-term storage medium, is now known
to deteriorate, sometimes in just a decade or two, and people
responsible for data storage feel compelled to refresh their data
periodically by burning fresh copies.

I wanted to give the BOOK_ARTS-L list members specific online references
so that they could easily verify these general observations I've made,
but these conclusions are commonly accepted among conservationists and
there are a multitude of authoritative sources that could be used.  But,
as a starting point, anyone who would like to explore this further could
go to http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/ since this is a rather exhaustive
resource for conservation issues.

T. A. Brown
Franconia, New Hampshire  USA



DT Fletcher wrote:

I look towards the disc that was placed on the Vovager spacecraft for
guidance.  As I recall, this was a gold plated disc of some sort.   From this, the
target writing material should be gold plated.  Laser etching should serve as
the print engine.    So, take a sturdy, stable, clear material and deposit a
layer of gold on one side and seal it.  Then, through the clear material, "write"
on the gold with the laser.   Gee, sounds like something familiar....  a
CD-R!   Why not?

Taking this as a practical matter, I'm thinking that a high quality gold CD
would be the perfect candicate for an eternity page.  Of course, instead of
digital code, the etching would be in regular text.   I can't think of anyone
doing this, but there is no reason why it wouldn't work.  The quality of the
surface is so uniform that the text could be reduced to micro-dot level.  So, a
vast amount of data could be stored on a single CD, even in the real-world text
format.


After writing to the CD-R, all that would be needed would be a bomb-flood- fire-earthquake proof container for the CDs. Which any local safe retailer would be happy to provide.

Even if the problem was to produce something closer to regular sheets of
paper, I would still suggest the same basic technique.  Sandwich a thin sheet of
gold between two sheets of plastic and then laser etch the gold through the
plastic.   However, I love the idea of writiing text onto a CD-R.

Dean

***********************************************

                      Spring[binding]Hath Sprung
        Worldwide Springback Bind-O-Rama and Online Exhibition
           Full information at <http://www.philobiblon.com>
                  ENTRY DEADLINE -- September 1, 2004

     Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
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***********************************************


                      Spring[binding]Hath Sprung
        Worldwide Springback Bind-O-Rama and Online Exhibition
           Full information at <http://www.philobiblon.com>
                  ENTRY DEADLINE -- September 1, 2004

     Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
            ***********************************************


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