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Re: [BKARTS] BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 15 Mar 2005 to 16 Mar 2005 (#2005-75)



A wonderful book that raises lots of ethical questions but looks at the
importance of preservation of knowledge in book form  is "A Canticle for
Liebowitz" by Walter Miller. I feel that I should rush off to our local
library and offer to spend  time doing book repairs.

Adrienne
------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 05:09:58 -0500
From:    bertha rogers <bkrogers@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: secret book repair

Yes, the books belong to the taxpayers, but it's the same as the
national parks and
public museums: just because they "belong" to us, we have no right to
live in the parks,
reroute traffic there, as we have no right to take out and polish
ancient coins or reline
paintings. We must not assume that our knowledge gives us the right to
"fix" things,
"Improve" them. There lies anarchy and, worse, dictatorship.
Bertha Rogers

On 15 Mar 2005 at 21:33, Rachel M. Kadel-Garcia wrote:

On Tue, 15 Mar 2005, P. Wren wrote:

>
> Faulty analogy I believe!
> The books really belong to the taxpayers. She would be saving all of
> them money, including herself. Vandalism?? Well, according to my
> dictionary, vandalism is destruction of property. Surely, repairing a
> book is NOT destructive.
>
> pam, still a librarian

Rebinding a book (which is where this thread started) absolutely has a
destructive element.  When I started learning conservation work, I was
shocked by the violence of the initial preparation stages.  (I'm not
sure
what exactly I was expecting, but slicing off the covers of books with
scalpels was not it.)  If you're rebinding in a new case, then the whole
original binding is destroyed; if you're retaining the original boards,
there will still be elements of the original structure that are lost or
altered.  That loss of artifactual information is often outweighed by
gains in stability and functionality.  But that doesn't mean it's not a
loss.

It's not only old and rare books that have something of value or
interest
to their bindings, either.  Sometimes there's an interesting or relevant
image on the cover or the endsheets, sometimes the structure or
materials
of the binding itself have something to say about the book.  (A couple
of
examples, things I saw in the past couple of weeks: a current art book
whose boards are mostly exposed, with titling information embossed in
them
in blind.  And an edition of the works of Gandhi, bound in handspun
kadhi
cloth.)

Rachel

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 08:21:18 -0500
From:    Rob Richards <rtfminc@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Secretly add a book to the library

The thought occured to me when Frances said:

only book on this subject that the library has, and it is entirely
un-academic, and I've always >secretly wondered how it got there, so I
can't imagine that anyone would be bothered if it

Why not take some book that you love and place it in the library. Of
course you could just donate it, but in the spirit of secret repairs -
a secret placement.

ciao,
-rob

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 06:20:38 -0800
From:    Karen Bulow <karen_bulow@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: secret book repair

Although I think this string is very interesting and I
am glad that so many of us are looking at the ethical
reasoning behind a secret book repair, there's a good
chance that the librarian who is going to make that
decision is not going mull over this decision as much
as we have.  His/Her decision may be based more on
what sort of a day she is having than the ethics or
library policies behind the decision.  We also seem to
be second guessing the policies of a library that we
know nothing about.

With that in mind, I do think you need to ask, but
make sure you do talk to the right person and try to
make them truly think about what you are offering them
and let them know they can tell you later so they
don't need to make a split decision.  If you can, try
to find out more about the book repair process of that
library before you even ask. That would be good
knowledge to arm yourself with.

Karen Bulow
Librarian




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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:02:11 -0500
From:    Don Rash <studior@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: WAS:Secret book repair

Seems like the librarians are really taking it on the chin here, so I
thought I'd share my Favorite Quotation About Librarians From An
Unlikely Source:

"Dad claims that library science is the foundation of all sciences just
as math is the key - and that we will survive, or founder, depending on
how well the librarians do their jobs."

Robert Heinlein: Have Space Suit - Will Travel

Don Rash

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:04:35 -0500
From:    Amy West <medievalist@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secret book repair

When that book was (hmm...in museum work they say "accessioned", do
they use that in the library context as well?) added to the
collection, the library not only put a bar code on it, but also
marked it inside somewhere with the library's name and perhaps put a
security strip in it somewhere. They collect overdue fines on it. If
a borrower loses it they have to pay a replacement fee. It's the
library that purchases the item or accepts the gift. What other
indications do you need that it is the library's property?

And no one has mentioned how rebinding will affect it: if there is a
security strip in there or marks of provenance that don't get
replaced when rebound, then it's easier to steal, eh?

I'm firmly on the talk to the librarians side. And I'm very much like
that 80-year-old in RI: just a couple of workshops under my belt, yet
the school librarians are thrilled to let me fix stuff. I know my
limitations: this is a high-circulation collection where there aren't
irreplaceable items.

And Peter is right on the money about saving ourselves: early on
there were books that I gladly would have spent hours working on that
the librarian just opted to get a new (and library-bound) copy.

And Susan is right on the money about items being discarded primarily
for lack of use: the school librarian is weeding out books from the
50s, 60s, 70s that are in fairly good condition. Why? Because they
aren't read.

---Amy (newbie repairer, school library volunteer)

Date:    Tue, 15 Mar 2005 17:07:02 -0500
From:    "J. J. Foncannon" <bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secret book repair
MIME-Version: 1.0
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     I think the whole ethical issue of repairing publically owned
books involves
the concept of "ownership."  To assert that libraries "own" books, or
worse, that
librarians are the owners of the books under their aegis, just
reinforces the
popular conception of librarians as anal-retentive, secretive, and
overly-possessive.  I can only imagine the reaction of such a typical
librarian to
an attempt by an unwelcome "outsider" to establish a dialog about the
repair of a
book.

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             For all your subscription questions, go to the
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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:09:43 -0500
From:    "J. J. Foncannon" <bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [Fwd: [BKARTS] Secret book repair and JP's writing]

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--

__________________________________________________
**********************************************************
J. J. Foncannon
Philadelphia, PA  19139

 The Belgian surrealist painter Renee Magritte entered a cheese store in
Brussels to purchase a wheel of Swiss cheese.  The owner pulled a wheel
from the front window, but Magritte said he preferred the one on the
back counter.
 “But they are identical,” the owner protested.
 “No,” Magritte insisted.  “This one’s been stared at.”
**********************************************************


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Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2005 08:53:10 -0600
From: "Diane Westerfield" <DWESTER@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: [BKARTS] Secret book repair and JP's writing
To: <bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx>
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Hi,
I'm on the BKARTS list but my postings keep on bouncing back so I'm
writing this directly to you.

I've worked in academic libraries for 10+ years and am pursuing my
Master's in Library Science (you need an MLS to be a librarian).  I can
tell you that libraries of all types and sizes regularly discard books,
from the University of Chicago to small, in-house law firm libraries.
Among the many reasons, the two most important:  more books are
published all the time and need to be acquired, and all  libraries have
finite space in which to store books.  Another reason is that some books
go out of date pretty quickly and should not be used at all (medical and
legal books).  Therefore, some books must be removed.  Book sales are
well and good, but sometimes it isn't worth the effort in staff time for
the amount of money that is brought in; and the medical/legal books
should probably be recycled or thrown out directly.   People go nuts
when large quantities of books are thrown out, so often times libraries
sneak them into dumpsters at night.

In my current academic library, we used to have a truck of books for
sale by the Circulation Desk, but our university president decided that
it looked tacky.  So no more book sales.

Every librarian loves books.  But we constantly run out of room.
Libraries are usually understaffed and often the librarians don't have
time to make detailed, well-informed decisions about what to withdraw
from the collection.  Particularly because it is such a hot topic,
librarians have a tendency to put off withdrawals until the space
problem has reached a crisis point, then it's off to the dumpsters.

Some ways you can help: form or join a local Friends of the Libraries
club and offer to lend a hand, organize book sales, etc., so the whole
dumpster thing can be avoided.  Help them prepare guidelines for regular
weeding of the collections.  Organize a tax increase in your community
to enlarge the library so there's enough space to add to the collection
for X number of years.

Diane Westerfield

bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx 03/15/05 10:47 PM >>>
    Good words, from the real world, JP.
    Concerning the vaunted stewardship of librarians:  in practice, that
stewardship is often abrogated.  About year ago in Philadelphia, several
dumpsters full of books were spotted near the main branch of the public
library
(in Philadelphia, known as the Free Library.)  No one could explain how
or why
those books were discarded.  Many were in excellent condition, and many
were
books of intrinsic interest.  If they were superfluous copies, not
needed by
the main branch of the library, they could certainly be used by the
volume
starved branch libraries.
    It turns out that in this case the "stewards" had been as casual in
the
disposal of their charges as they were and are in maintaining the
condition of
same.  Only after a relentless investigation on the part of the
Philadelphia
Inquirer, which required an assault on the conspiracy of silence the
library
was maintaining about the situation, was the history of the discarded
books
solved.  A typical bureaucratic snafu, as I recall. A grudging admission
of
error and a promise not to repeat the offense was wrested from the
librarians
at the Free Library.  God knows how many previous dumpsters had been
filled
with books, then emptied.
    You see why I can't take very seriously such assertions as,
"However, they
[librarians] are the duly appointed caretakers of the books and have been
chosen
for their knowledge, experience, and training.  They are responsible for
developing and maintaining the collection under their care."  This may
be true
in some theoretical world.  In the real world, I will do what I think is
is
right, as JP's wife did.  In fact, in JP's situation occurred at our own
Free
Library, I would consider it purely laughable to "obtain permission
first [to
clean a book] or leave it to the Librarian, as the duly appointed
caretaker, to
clean those books by accepted practices and procedures that are
acceptable as
determined by the policies of the library....."  Why should I timorously
beg to
clean one book while mountains of books were being shovelled out the
back door?

JP wrote:

quote:
> Librarians do not own the books, it is true (the libraries do).
However,
> they are the duly appointed caretakers of the books >and have been
chosen
> for their knowledge, experience, and training.  They are responsible
for
> developing and maintaining >the collection under their care.  They are
> also responsible for ensuring that patrons who use the library treat
the
> materials in >ways that are acceptable as determined by the policies
of
> the library.

If this is so, then please tell me why that book or any book ends up
back in
the stacks in that condition or that needs repair?  If (as stated above)
librarians are "responsible for developing and maintaining the
collection
under their care"  and  were so concerned about their(our?) "property",
they
wouldn't allow a damaged book back on the shelf.  I wouldn't with my own
collection.

And those folks that will fix with scotch tape will continue to do so
regardless of what we say here, laws of ownership or not.  IF a hinge is
loose, would it violate some moral code to take 5 minutes to fix it?  Or
dump it in the drop box and have it back on the shelf 2 days later to be
wrecked more? Which is more responsible?

Also, we have a Friends of the Library here.   They sell books from the
stacks as a non profit and the library then uses the money to buy more
books.  I have seen brand new books on relevant current topics for sale
there, and a WHOLE section on American Indian history ( in a county
where
there were LOTS of Indians around (central valley, CALIF).  These were
some
REALLY old books that had definite historical research value.  ANd they
went
to FoL to be sold at 5 cents on the dollar..... And they are no longer
available to be used for research.  I can think of a lot of other books
that
could be eliminated if they need room in the stacks for more books.
They
could start with the romance novels......

As an aside, when my boys were toddlers, my wife went to the library
every
week and checked out the maximum number of books (I think it was around
40)
for us to read to them and as they got older, for them to read.
Obviously
these were children's books, (I'm not sure what the life expectancy of a
children's book in the library is...) and they were FILTHY.  The first
thing
my wife would do is CLEAN the covers (she's a nurse....).  She, over the
years, probably cleaned most of the books in the children's section of
the
library.  Was that wrong?  Did she change the the value of the book
because
she cleaned the cover from sticky to at least being reasonably clean?
Was
that defacing?  No sarcasm here, as those who are purist  would contend
that
she should have gotten permission first or leave it to the Librarian,
as the
duly appointed caretaker, to clean those books by accepted practices and
procedures that are acceptable as determined by the policies of the
library........

Interesting discussion...............
Jim

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             For all your subscription questions, go to the
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--


__________________________________________________
**********************************************************
J. J. Foncannon
Philadelphia, PA  19139

 The Belgian surrealist painter Renee Magritte entered a cheese store in
Brussels to purchase a wheel of Swiss cheese.  The owner pulled a wheel
from
the front window, but Magritte said he preferred the one on the back
counter.
 "But they are identical," the owner protested.
 "No," Magritte insisted.  "This one's been stared at."
**********************************************************

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:15:18 -0500
From:    Dorothy Africa <africa@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: secret book repair

Like many others I have followed this thread with considerable interest,
not least because I do repair for a large academic library.  I would
certainly weigh in with the opinion that stealth repair to someone else's
book, be the owner a person or an institution is unethical.  I would
concede small repairs, such as a tear (no scotch tape), especially if I
was
the one who tore the page.  It may be true that the attention is
beneficial, but that is not the point.

Most libraries are flat out grateful for the assistance of their patrons,
so I can't imagine the offer of free assistance from a competent repair
person would go begging, especially at a public library.  More to the
point, you have much, much more to offer than you know.  A small public
branch library for instance, may have no one on staff able to judge
repair
needs, much less do them.  Some help from you in evaluating the
collection,
what can be easily repaired, what must be replaced, are areas in which
your
input could be deeply appreciated by the staff.

Several people have already written in speaking of their work assisting
libraries and other institutions in this manner.  If you work in secret,
there is no chance for the staff to use your skills in concert with
theirs
to maximize the available benefit for the books.   Especially now as
modern
mass machine bindings take over, many small town libraries are in
possession of fine nineteenth century publishers' bindings which are
becoming valuable.  With no one to assist them in assessing their
collection, such books can often be discarded and replaced with new ones
simply because no one pointed out to them that the original was
repairable,
potentially valuable, and perhaps even more durable than a modern
replacement once repaired.

Dorothy Africa

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             For all your subscription questions, go to the
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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:27:10 -0500
From:    "J. J. Foncannon" <bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: unnecessary repairs

    Linda Hall Library in Kansas City is the premier technical library
in the world.  When I was working in Kansas City, the director of the
library, a chemist by training and a terrifically sweet person,
supervised not only the usual library functions but oversaw on of the
richest collections of technical rare books in existence:  original
copies of Newton's Principia, Vesalius' Anatomy, etc.  These books, he
decided were looking a little scruffy.  So he had them rebound.  I
almost fainted when he proudly showed me the result: garish covers made
of what appeared to be garment or designer leather, and stamping done
with some modern Roman font.
    A previous poster to this group stated that librarians don't always
have a sense about how to appropriately restore a book.  This
underscores her argument.

--

__________________________________________________
**********************************************************
Jet Foncannon
Philadelphia, PA  19139

 The Belgian surrealist painter Renee Magritte entered a cheese store in
Brussels to purchase a wheel of Swiss cheese.  The owner pulled a wheel
from the front window, but Magritte said he preferred the one on the
back counter.
 “But they are identical,” the owner protested.
 “No,” Magritte insisted.  “This one’s been stared at.”
**********************************************************

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:32:52 -0500
From:    "J. J. Foncannon" <bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secret book repair and JP's writing

    Concerning the uses of old books.  The Free Library of Philadelphia
has (finally) done something imaginative and worthwhile about the
problem.  They have rented an old storefront behind the library and
converted it into a capacious and well-stocked used book store.  Not
only are outmoded library books sold there, but book donations are
accepted.  The store has proved wildly popular, and thousands of books
are saved from an untimely death.  A nice auxiliary source of income for
the Free Library, too.  Unfortunate that some librarians consider such a
solution "tacky."

Diane Westerfield wrote:

Hi,
I'm on the BKARTS list but my postings keep on bouncing back so I'm
writing this directly to you.

I've worked in academic libraries for 10+ years and am pursuing my
Master's in Library Science (you need an MLS to be a librarian).  I can
tell you that libraries of all types and sizes regularly discard books,
from the University of Chicago to small, in-house law firm libraries.
Among the many reasons, the two most important:  more books are
published all the time and need to be acquired, and all  libraries have
finite space in which to store books.  Another reason is that some
books go out of date pretty quickly and should not be used at all
(medical and legal books).  Therefore, some books must be removed.
Book sales are well and good, but sometimes it isn't worth the effort
in staff time for the amount of money that is brought in; and the
medical/legal books should probably be recycled or thrown out
directly.   People go nuts when large quantities of books are thrown
out, so often times libraries sneak them into dumpsters at night.

In my current academic library, we used to have a truck of books for
sale by the Circulation Desk, but our university president decided that
it looked tacky.  So no more book sales.

Every librarian loves books.  But we constantly run out of room.
Libraries are usually understaffed and often the librarians don't have
time to make detailed, well-informed decisions about what to withdraw
from the collection.  Particularly because it is such a hot topic,
librarians have a tendency to put off withdrawals until the space
problem has reached a crisis point, then it's off to the dumpsters.

Some ways you can help: form or join a local Friends of the Libraries
club and offer to lend a hand, organize book sales, etc., so the whole
dumpster thing can be avoided.  Help them prepare guidelines for
regular weeding of the collections.  Organize a tax increase in your
community to enlarge the library so there's enough space to add to the
collection for X number of years.

Diane Westerfield

>>> bolu.bolu@xxxxxxxxxxx 03/15/05 10:47 PM >>>
    Good words, from the real world, JP.
    Concerning the vaunted stewardship of librarians:  in practice, that
stewardship is often abrogated.  About year ago in Philadelphia, several
dumpsters full of books were spotted near the main branch of the public
library
(in Philadelphia, known as the Free Library.)  No one could explain how
or why
those books were discarded.  Many were in excellent condition, and many
were
books of intrinsic interest.  If they were superfluous copies, not
needed by
the main branch of the library, they could certainly be used by the
volume
starved branch libraries.
    It turns out that in this case the "stewards" had been as casual in
the
disposal of their charges as they were and are in maintaining the
condition of
same.  Only after a relentless investigation on the part of the
Philadelphia
Inquirer, which required an assault on the conspiracy of silence the
library
was maintaining about the situation, was the history of the discarded
books
solved.  A typical bureaucratic snafu, as I recall. A grudging
admission of
error and a promise not to repeat the offense was wrested from the
librarians
at the Free Library.  God knows how many previous dumpsters had been
filled
with books, then emptied.
    You see why I can't take very seriously such assertions as,
"However, they
[librarians] are the duly appointed caretakers of the books and have
been
chosen
for their knowledge, experience, and training.  They are responsible for
developing and maintaining the collection under their care."  This may
be true
in some theoretical world.  In the real world, I will do what I think
is is
right, as JP's wife did.  In fact, in JP's situation occurred at our
own Free
Library, I would consider it purely laughable to "obtain permission
first [to
clean a book] or leave it to the Librarian, as the duly appointed
caretaker, to
clean those books by accepted practices and procedures that are
acceptable as
determined by the policies of the library....."  Why should I
timorously beg to
clean one book while mountains of books were being shovelled out the
back door?

JP wrote:

> quote:
> > Librarians do not own the books, it is true (the libraries do).
However,
> > they are the duly appointed caretakers of the books >and have been
chosen
> > for their knowledge, experience, and training.  They are
responsible for
> > developing and maintaining >the collection under their care.  They
are
> > also responsible for ensuring that patrons who use the library
treat the
> > materials in >ways that are acceptable as determined by the
policies of
> > the library.
>
> If this is so, then please tell me why that book or any book ends up
back in
> the stacks in that condition or that needs repair?  If (as stated
above)
> librarians are "responsible for developing and maintaining the
collection
> under their care"  and  were so concerned about their(our?)
"property", they
> wouldn't allow a damaged book back on the shelf.  I wouldn't with my
own
> collection.
>
> And those folks that will fix with scotch tape will continue to do so
> regardless of what we say here, laws of ownership or not.  IF a hinge
is
> loose, would it violate some moral code to take 5 minutes to fix it?
Or
> dump it in the drop box and have it back on the shelf 2 days later to
be
> wrecked more? Which is more responsible?
>
> Also, we have a Friends of the Library here.   They sell books from
the
> stacks as a non profit and the library then uses the money to buy more
> books.  I have seen brand new books on relevant current topics for
sale
> there, and a WHOLE section on American Indian history ( in a county
where
> there were LOTS of Indians around (central valley, CALIF).  These
were some
> REALLY old books that had definite historical research value.  ANd
they went
> to FoL to be sold at 5 cents on the dollar..... And they are no longer
> available to be used for research.  I can think of a lot of other
books that
> could be eliminated if they need room in the stacks for more books.
They
> could start with the romance novels......
>
> As an aside, when my boys were toddlers, my wife went to the library
every
> week and checked out the maximum number of books (I think it was
around 40)
> for us to read to them and as they got older, for them to read.
Obviously
> these were children's books, (I'm not sure what the life expectancy
of a
> children's book in the library is...) and they were FILTHY.  The
first thing
> my wife would do is CLEAN the covers (she's a nurse....).  She, over
the
> years, probably cleaned most of the books in the children's section
of the
> library.  Was that wrong?  Did she change the the value of the book
because
> she cleaned the cover from sticky to at least being reasonably
clean?  Was
> that defacing?  No sarcasm here, as those who are purist  would
contend that
> she should have gotten permission first or leave it to the Librarian,
as the
> duly appointed caretaker, to clean those books by accepted practices
and
> procedures that are acceptable as determined by the policies of the
> library........
>
> Interesting discussion...............
> Jim
>
>              ***********************************************
>      The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist
>
>              For all your subscription questions, go to the
>                       Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
>
>                   Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
>              ***********************************************

--

__________________________________________________
**********************************************************
J. J. Foncannon
Philadelphia, PA  19139

 The Belgian surrealist painter Renee Magritte entered a cheese store in
Brussels to purchase a wheel of Swiss cheese.  The owner pulled a wheel
from
the front window, but Magritte said he preferred the one on the back
counter.
 "But they are identical," the owner protested.
 "No," Magritte insisted.  "This one's been stared at."
**********************************************************

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
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             ***********************************************

--


__________________________________________________
**********************************************************
J. J. Foncannon
Philadelphia, PA  19139

 The Belgian surrealist painter Renee Magritte entered a cheese store in
Brussels to purchase a wheel of Swiss cheese.  The owner pulled a wheel
from the front window, but Magritte said he preferred the one on the
back counter.
 “But they are identical,” the owner protested.
 “No,” Magritte insisted.  “This one’s been stared at.”
**********************************************************

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:46:13 -0500
From:    Jennybean <jennybean@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WAS:Secret book repair

Seems like the librarians are really taking it on the chin here, so I
thought I'd share my Favorite Quotation About Librarians From An
Unlikely Source:

"Dad claims that library science is the foundation of all sciences just
as math is the key - and that we will survive, or founder, depending on
how well the librarians do their jobs."

Robert Heinlein: Have Space Suit - Will Travel


Good quote!

And, for some library humor, there is a funny online comic that some
librarians may appreciate called
"Unshelved"
http://www.overduemedia.com/archive.aspx?strip=20030425

I like that they sell t shirts that say "What Would Dewey Do?"

-Jenny


-- ******************************************* When I typed this email, it made total sense. That does not guarantee it will make sense when you are reading it. Consider it a mystery of time and space...


Check out the website in progress: http://www.madwomanintheattic.com *****************************************

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

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             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 11:17:27 -0500
From:    shelly <scouvrette@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secret book repair

On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:04:35 -0500, Amy West <medievalist@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

When that book was (hmm...in museum work they say "accessioned", do
they use that in the library context as well?) added to the
collection,

cataloged


--=20
Shelly

Color is the place where our brain and the universe meet.
-- Paul Klee

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                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
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             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 16:23:54 +0000
From:    Stephanie K <frostyoranges@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Now a scanner question - recommendations?

Hello you helpful people,

Ok, I've got the Epson 2200 down, and now I'm just choosing a scanner!  I
will be doing primarily flat art scanning - line art & gray washes, some
color - and some slide scanning.

The top contenders from what I've researched are: the Epson 4180 at
$200, or
the Epson 4870 photo at $400.  The 4180 is 3.4 dmax, the 4870 is 3.8
dmax.
From what I understand, the 4870's superior at slide scanning & has
programs
to ease that (digital ice, to help remove dust digitally) - but I don't
really have a way to test that.  But maybe the 4180 is also excellent?
I'm
just trying to decide if a 3.4 dmax is excellent ENOUGH - do I really
need
to spend an extra $200 - but if the difference is that profound, it's
worth
it.

Any feedback?  Do any of you have experience with either scanner, or
another
favorite you'd recommend?

Thanks again.  It's so great to have ppl out there who've already tested
this stuff.... :)

Stephanie

             ***********************************************
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             For all your subscription questions, go to the
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             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:40:32 -0600
From:    Joan Michaels Paque <joanmichaels@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Now a scanner question - recommendations?

Stephanie,

I currently have the Epson 4180 scanner  and I am pleased with it.  Most
of the photos
on my web site were scanned with it from slides.  Course, it depends on
the quality of the slides
photos or whatever.  But, I'd highly recommend it this Epson.

joan

www.joanmichaels.paque.com


Stephanie K wrote:


Hello you helpful people,

Ok, I've got the Epson 2200 down, and now I'm just choosing a scanner!
I
will be doing primarily flat art scanning - line art & gray washes, some
color - and some slide scanning.

The top contenders from what I've researched are: the Epson 4180 at
$200, or
the Epson 4870 photo at $400.  The 4180 is 3.4 dmax, the 4870 is 3.8
dmax.

From what I understand, the 4870's superior at slide scanning & has
programs

to ease that (digital ice, to help remove dust digitally) - but I don't really have a way to test that. But maybe the 4180 is also excellent? I'm just trying to decide if a 3.4 dmax is excellent ENOUGH - do I really need to spend an extra $200 - but if the difference is that profound, it's worth it.

Any feedback?  Do any of you have experience with either scanner, or
another
favorite you'd recommend?

Thanks again.  It's so great to have ppl out there who've already tested
this stuff.... :)

Stephanie

            ***********************************************
    The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

            For all your subscription questions, go to the
                     Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                 Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
            ***********************************************




*********************************************** The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

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             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:43:41 -0600
From:    Juliayn Coleman <mulimayn@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secretly add a book to the library

Actually, this can be far more of a headache for librarians sometimes
than
even the thought of people altering their books willy- nilly. Whenever we
find books in the library where I work that do not have our imprints and
barcode, it is a massive headache to decide what to do with them. Patron
lost and found? Or was it meant as a donation? Should we hold on to it in
case the original owner comes back looking for it? How long? We have two
medium- sized boxes of these materials that we must hold on to for two
years
(!) before we can consider them donations, so if someone just told us it
was
a donation it would make things a lot easier.
We, and many libraries, charge a processing fee over and above any
replacement fees charged when patrons fail to return items, which should
indicate that there are costs to us involved when we need to accession,
catalog, and process new items.
Just a thought...

             ***********************************************
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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 09:46:53 -0800
From:    Linda Stinchfield <lindas@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: secret book repair

This has been a fascinating thread. But please, I'm dying to know. What
IS
the book? Maybe we can all look for a copy for you.

Linda S.


I constantly look for this book actually, but I've never
been able to find it anywhere but this library... I have a secret fear
that it is the only copy in the world and it is my responsibility
to preserve it.


*********************************************** The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 12:55:48 -0500
From:    Oak Knoll <oakknoll@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: The Scholar Librarian

DO NOT USE YOUR EMAIL REPLY FUNCTION TO RESPOND TO THIS ANNOUNCEMENT.

PLEASE RESPOND TO <mailto:orders@xxxxxxxxxxxx> orders@xxxxxxxxxxxx

=20

The Scholar-Librarian, Books, Libraries, and the Visual Arts has just
arrived at Oak Knoll!=20

=20

This edition, written by Richard Wendorf, documents the professional,
scholarly, and personal interests of one of America=92s most =
distinguished
library directors =96 Richard Wendorf. In these essays Richard Wendorf's
critical intelligence can be gauged in his analysis of works as diverse =
as
the poetical manuscripts of Alexander Pope, Michelangelo Antonioni's
Blow-Up, and Piranesi's early etchings, as well as various typographical
=
and
bibliographical issues. But several of these essays also reveal another =
side
of the author as he writes in a more personal (and often humorous) style
about collecting, libraries, and librarianship.

=20

Check out The Scholar-Librarian at the following link:

<http://oakknoll.com/detail.php?d_booknr=3D79253>=20

=20


We also have many more titles with similar subjects. Check out the = following online catalogue to view our titles on Twentieth Century Libraries and Biographies of Libraries, and also The Boston Anthen=E6um:

=20

<http://oakknoll.com/results.php?s_Catnr=3D911
<http://oakknoll.com/results.php?s_Catnr=3D911&s_ShowPics=3D1> =
&s_ShowPics=3D1> =20

=20

Best wishes,

Your Oak Knollers

=20

=20

=20

Oak Knoll Books
310 Delaware Street New Castle DE 19720
P: 302.328.7232 - F: 302.328.7274 - E: oakknoll@xxxxxxxxxxxx web
<http://www.oakknoll.com/> http://www.oakknoll.com/
Member Antiquarian Bookseller's Association of America (ABAA)
<http://www.abaa.org/> http://www.abaa.org/
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB)
<http://www.ilab-lila.com/> http://www.ilab-lila.com/
Buy with confidence of consumer protection when you buy from an ILAB
bookseller=20

=20


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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 12:00:44 -0600
From:    JIM WITTSTRUCK <JWITTSTRUCK@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secret book repair

Frances,

I'm reading with interest the entire thread about repairing the library
book, and your circumstances are quite well expressed....

You have me wondering now, WHAT BOOK IS IT?  Must be pretty special if
it is not really a library type book, not rare, etc....

Can you share that with us?

Jim Wittstruck
Lakeville, MN

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:15:16 -0800
From:    Karen Bulow <karen_bulow@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WAS:Secret book repair - when good books go bad

I am a librarian and I was one of the people who made
a somewhat negative comment about what librarians may
do with the book.  I've worked as both a rare book
librarian and as a public services librarian who (to
my own rare book horror) became a major "weeding
librarian" for a public library.  I eventually was
glad I was one of them because I learned how little
some of the other librarians know about rare books.  I
do not fault them because no one really taught them
any better.  I did my best to convince them to bring
materials to me if they may have a question about
either weeding, book repair (or processing for that
matter).  I do hope that rare book librarians will
read this and see that maybe some of the other
librarians in their institutions can use some
education on what to look for in a rare book and what
to do when they find them.  Having good PR within your
institution will help to stop valuable books or any
sort from being defaced or thrown away.

Karen Bulow
Librarian


--- Jennybean <jennybean@xxxxxxx> wrote:
>Seems like the librarians are really taking it on
the chin here, so I
>thought I'd share my Favorite Quotation About
Librarians From An
>Unlikely Source:
>
>"Dad claims that library science is the foundation
of all sciences just
>as math is the key - and that we will survive, or
founder, depending on
>how well the librarians do their jobs."
>
>Robert Heinlein: Have Space Suit - Will Travel


Good quote!


And, for some library humor, there is a funny online
comic that some
librarians may appreciate called
"Unshelved"

http://www.overduemedia.com/archive.aspx?strip=20030425

I like that they sell t shirts that say "What Would Dewey Do?"

-Jenny


-- ******************************************* When I typed this email, it made total sense. That does not guarantee it will make sense when you are reading it. Consider it a mystery of time and space...


Check out the website in progress: http://www.madwomanintheattic.com *****************************************


*********************************************** The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go
to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at:
<http://www.philobiblon.com>

***********************************************




__________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site! http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 13:48:17 -0500
From:    Mary Yordy <mary.yordy@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: Altered Library Book

This discussion reminds me of the discovery of a book in the Duke
Divinity
School collection that was found to include--beautifully tipped in and
trimmed so that it was not apparent unless the book was read--a page
from a
pornographic novel.

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:53:10 -0800
From:    Gudrun Aurand <aurandg@xxxxxxx>
Subject: internship

We are now seeking candidates for the 4th Annual John W. & Mildred
Bissinger Preservation Internship. The successful candidate will work for
one month as an Intern in the Preservation/Conservation Laboratory in
Manuscripts, Archives & Special Collections (MASC) at Washington State
University (Pullman, WA) under the supervision of Gudrun Aurand,
Bookbinder/Conservator.
During the course of the Internship, participants will learn the
fundamentals of book and paper repair.
Apart form hands-on experience, the intern will:
    * Learn about different Binding Styles and have the opportunity to
examine MASC collections.
    * Become familiar with online preservation sites and discussion
groups.
    * Have the opportunity to meet with MASC Librarians to learn about
preservation concerns in Archives collection management.
Interested applicants should also visit the
MASC website
<http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/holland/masc/conserve.htm>http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/holland/masc/conserve.htm.


The internship is scheduled to begin Tuesday, July 5, 2005 and will end Friday, July 29, 2005. May 15, 2004 is the deadline for application. For further information and how to apply contact Gudrun Aurand: aurandg@xxxxxxxx


everything is an aspect of something


Gudrun Aurand
Bookbinder/Conservator
Washington State University
Pullman, WA 99164-5610
e-mail: aurandg@xxxxxxx
Tel.: 509.335.7463
http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/holland/masc/conserve.htm

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 14:07:55 -0600
From:    Lynn Sures <lsures@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Watermark class in Italy

Museum of Paper and Watermark, Fabriano, Italy
Papermaking and Watermark Workshop and Tour
Monday June 20-Sunday June 26, 2005
=20
The town of Fabriano, Italy is the destination of a unique one-week
hands-o=
n
workshop led by papermaker Lynn Sures and the American Museum of
Papermaking=B9s Teri Williams.  Begin each day on site in the antique
papermill learning from Fabriano master papermakers Roberto Rapanotti and
Luigi Mecella, using their watermarked molds and deckles.

Spend afternoons on excursions arranged by the Fabriano museum, to
remarkable local places of interest=8Bfrom picturesque medieval towns to
natural wonders in the province of Ancona.

For information on the Fabriano museum, read Sures's article "Living
Museum=
s
of Papermaking in Italy, Part 2" in the Winter, 2002 issue of the journal
Hand Papermaking, and visit the Fabriano website www.museodellacarta.com

This trip will take place during the week of the Palio/ medieval
festival i=
n
Fabriano.
=20
For more information, contact Teri Williams at 404-894-6663 or
teri.williams@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

--Lynn
=20

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                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 15:04:29 -0500
From:    Lavinia Adler <laviniaa@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WAS:Secret book repair

A decade or two ago someone opined that in case of a world disaster, if
only some people could be saved, those most useful for the regeneration
of our civilization would be engineers, librarians, and children. Wish I
could remember who said it.

Lavinia Adler

On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 10:02:11 -0500 Don Rash <studior@xxxxxxxx> writes:
Seems like the librarians are really taking it on the chin here, so I
thought I'd share my Favorite Quotation About Librarians From An
Unlikely Source:

"Dad claims that library science is the foundation of all sciences
just
as math is the key - and that we will survive, or founder, depending
on
how well the librarians do their jobs."

Robert Heinlein: Have Space Suit - Will Travel

Don Rash

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 15:43:13 -0500
From:    Kim Norman <kimnorman@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: book arts event/Martin Frost lecture+workshop

Fore-Edge Painting Lecture and Workshop--April 14 and 16, 2005

The Southeast Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers and the Friends of
the Emory University Libraries are pleased to bring British book artist
Martin Frost to Atlanta to present "The Curious Art of the Secret
Fore-Edge Painting". Mr. Frost will present a free slide lecture, open
to the public, as well as teach a one-day workshop.

Designed to appeal to both painters and book workers (book artists,
binders, conservators, crafts people) of all levels, the illustrated
lecture describes the genesis and progress of this little-known art
form and will feature painted books from the artist's own collection.
The one-day, hands-on workshop will teach the techniques of English
water coloring onto book-edges. Participants will take home their own
painting, hidden under the gold edges of their own book!

Martin Frost teaches fore-edge painting in England and has taught the
art in Northern California. He has painted over 3,000 book-edges and
his work is held by many institutions, national and private collections
worldwide. This is the last stop on Mr. Frost's eastern US tour, and
thus the last chance to experience this unique artist.

Lecture with reception for the artist:
Where:          Robert W. Woodruff Library-Emory University, Atlanta
When:           Thursday, April 14, 2005, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Free and open to the public, with a reception for the artist. Free
parking is available.

Workshop:
Where:          Robert W. Woodruff Library, Emory University, Atlanta
When:           Saturday, April 16, 2005, 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Fee:            $100.00, plus cost of optional supplies
                $60 (for pre-gilded book and special clamp)

SE GBW chapter members receive a $10.00 discount off the registration
fee.

This workshop is being offered at a considerable discount to the other
workshops Martin Frost is teaching on his East Coast tour. Take
advantage of this!!

For more information about the lecture or workshop and registration, or
directions to the events, please contact Ann Frellsen,
Programs/Exhibitions coordinator, at 404-727-0307 or
ann.frellsen@xxxxxxxxx

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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 15:49:43 EST
From:    Lisa Deutsch <Lagourmet@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Edible Book Art Exhibition in Los Angeles

=20
CONTACT:=20
Lisa  Deutsch=20
(310)  657-2616=20
LAGourmet@xxxxxxx=20
FOR IMMEDIATE  RELEASE=20
ART YOU CAN  EAT!

Edible-Book Art Tea Party Exhibition Serves Up Food for Thought:  =20
A Cornucopia of Books  to Whet Your Appetite

(Los Angeles, CA) - A banquet of books will be  served up for the
publics=20
viewing---and feasting---pleasure at the Los Angeles  Book Arts
Center=E2=
=80=99s=20
International Edible Book High/Low Tea on Saturday, April 2,  from 2
p.m. to=
 5 p.m.=20
The tea party is a celebratory exhibit of books as  art---art you can
eat=20
because it=E2=80=99s made of food instead of paper.

These  delightful, delectable works of art will be on display at the
West=20
Hollywood  Community Center in Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica
Boulevard, We=
st=20
Hollywood.  Between 2 P.M. and 4 P.M., book-, art-  and fun-lovers of
all ag=
es=20
are invited to view this year=E2=80=99s entries and entrees,  meet the
artis=
ts, and=20
learn more about book art.  Kids will also enjoy a special activity
where t=
hey=20
can make their own books to take home with them. At 4 p.m., all of  the
book=
=20
art on display
will be served up with tea and coffee. This event is  FREE and open to
the=20
public.

WHAT=E2=80=99S ON THE MENU?
The Edible Book Tea  Party combines the creative and culinary talents of
man=
y=20
of the Southland=E2=80=99s  preeminent book artists who will be
transforming=
=20
fantasies of literature into a  feast for the eyes and palate.

Every type of book---children=E2=80=99s classics,  detective novels,
biograp=
hies,=20
romance---will be sculpted from a smorgasbord of  foodstuffs. Imagine
chocol=
ate=20
shoes whose tongues tell tales.  Or, baklava  books with pages made of
filo=20
dough. In past years, artists have designed text  on mobiles made from
fruit=
=20
roll-ups that looked like stained glass and written  poetry on growing
lettu=
ce,=20
which was harvested for a salad. Photographs of these  artistic
creations fr=
om=20
previous edible-book events can be viewed at =20
www.colophon.com/ediblebooks/photos.html

A CONSUMING PASSION FOR  BOOKS
Book artists see the book as an art form. They share a passion for
books in=
=20
every possible medium of artistic expression, from painting and drawing
to=20
sculpting and bookbinding.

The Los Angeles Book Arts Center (LABAC) is  dedicated to serving as a=20
creative, intellectual and technical resource for  artists, collectors,
deal=
ers,=20
curators and individuals interested in the book  and paper arts. The
nonprof=
it=20
Center=E2=80=99s mission is to help build a strong book  arts community
in t=
he Los=20
Angeles area by offering exhibitions, lectures,  classes, meetings and
conti=
nuous=20
online discussion groups.  LABAC offers a broad range of classes in  the
boo=
k=20
arts, drawing and calligraphy, paste papers and monoprints, book
structures=
,=20
cases and boxes, and everything between and beyond. For more
information,=20
please call 310-657-2616, or visit the LABAC Web site at
www.LABookArts.com=
.

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist
                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 13:08:58 -0800
From:    Gudrun Aurand <aurandg@xxxxxxx>
Subject: internship/wrong application deadline

Please, take note of the changed application deadline. I made an error in
my initial posting. Application deadline is Thursday, April 28, 2005

  We are now seeking candidates for the 4th Annual John W. & Mildred
Bissinger Preservation Internship. The successful candidate will work for
one month as an Intern in the Preservation/Conservation Laboratory in
Manuscripts, Archives & Special Collections (MASC) at Washington State
University (Pullman, WA) under the supervision of Gudrun Aurand,
Bookbinder/Conservator.
During the course of the Internship, participants will learn the
fundamentals of book and paper repair.
Apart form hands-on experience, the intern will:
    * Learn about different Binding Styles and have the opportunity to
examine MASC collections.
    * Become familiar with online preservation sites and discussion
groups.
    * Have the opportunity to meet with MASC Librarians to learn about
preservation concerns in Archives collection management.
Interested applicants should also visit the
MASC website
<http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/holland/masc/conserve.htm>http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/holland/masc/conserve.htm.


The internship is scheduled to begin Tuesday, July 5, 2005 and will end Friday, July 29, 2005. May 15, 2004 is the deadline for application. For further information and how to apply contact Gudrun Aurand: aurandg@xxxxxxxx








everything is an aspect of something


Gudrun Aurand
Bookbinder/Conservator
Washington State University
Pullman, WA 99164-5610
e-mail: aurandg@xxxxxxx
Tel.: 509.335.7463
http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/holland/masc/conserve.htm

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 16:56:11 EST
From:    DanceMarathon1@xxxxxxx
Subject: Re: BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 12 Mar 2005 to 13 Mar 2005 (#2005-72)

Sorry to get off the subject of adhesives and clasps!

 A L I C E    S I M P S O N=20
D A N C E   M A R A T H O N

From:=A0 =A0 Leonard Seastone <LSeastone@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Nordic Book Collectors
=20
The Tango is most loved in Finland.
=20
Leonard Seastone
aka Lennart Sjosten
=20





A L I C E * S I M P S O N D A N C E M A R A T H O N

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist
                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 17:18:22 EST
From:    DanceMarathon1@xxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Secret Book Repair

Hi Frances-
This seems to me story just daring to be told. The seed of an artist's
book.=
=20
If I have a vote, I say bind it, repair it, tenderly, and with all the
love=20
you have to give!
 Would you be so brave as to tell us the title and author?

A L I C E    S I M P S O N
D A N C E   M A R A T H O N

From:=A0 =A0 Frances Castle <StringBeanJean@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: secret book repair
=20
See, I have a favorite book from a local university library and it is=20
totally falling apart. It would be so easy to fix. It is not
particularly=20=
old or=20
valuable or anything, and I am pretty sure that I am the only person
who e=
ven=20
knows it exists. I love the book and I want to fix it so they don't
throw=20=
it=20
out. I know I could just point out the damage to them, but I'm afraid
that=
if=20
I did they would throw it out immediately rather than spend time or
money=20
fixing it. I work as a bookbinder who specializes in repair, and it
would=20=
be so=20
easy for me to fix this book. Do you all think that these thoughts of
mine=
=20
are totally unethical? Or maybe you think I am very generous for
wanting t=
o=20
repair a book free-of-charge? Thanks for the advice,
Frances
=20




             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist
                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 19:33:11 -0500
From:    Randolph Huebsch <rahuebsch@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Secret Book Repair

Maybe we've entered the land of Parable here, and the book should remain
unnamed--each person can speculate on the identity of the Book.

on 3/16/05 5:18 PM, DanceMarathon1@xxxxxxx at DanceMarathon1@xxxxxxx
wrote:

Hi Frances-
This seems to me story just daring to be told. The seed of an artist's
bo=
ok.
If I have a vote, I say bind it, repair it, tenderly, and with all the
lo=
ve
you have to give!
Would you be so brave as to tell us the title and author?
=20
A L I C E    S I M P S O N
D A N C E   M A R A T H O N
=20
From:=A0 =A0 Frances Castle <StringBeanJean@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: secret book repair
=20
See, I have a favorite book from a local university library and it is
totally falling apart. It would be so easy to fix. It is not
particularl=
y old
or=20
valuable or anything, and I am pretty sure that I am the only person
who=
even
knows it exists. I love the book and I want to fix it so they don't
thro=
w it
out. I know I could just point out the damage to them, but I'm afraid
th=
at if
I did they would throw it out immediately rather than spend time or
mone=
y
fixing it. I work as a bookbinder who specializes in repair, and it
woul=
d be
so=20
easy for me to fix this book. Do you all think that these thoughts of
mi=
ne
are totally unethical? Or maybe you think I am very generous for
wanting=
to
repair a book free-of-charge? Thanks for the advice,
Frances
=20
=20
=20
=20
=20
***********************************************
The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist
=20
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
=20
Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
***********************************************

*********************************************** The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist =20 For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive. =20 Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com> ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 17:46:02 -0600
From:    Mary Jo Koranda <mkoranda@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: secret book repairs  - response

First, I am a librarian, who among other things, does book repair at the
University of Wisconsin Law Library.

You should ask first. It is basic common courtesy.

There seems to be misconceptions about who works in libraries.  Not
everyone is a librarian.  We have students at the desk.  It is difficult
to get 20 of them to do everything the way we would like it done.  Maybe
one of them would set aside a book they thought needed repair.  So yes,
a lot of books needing repair get reshelved. Then there are
administrators who may or may not be librarians and their decisions may
reflect outside factors including budget constraints, departmental and
university pressures.  If you need space for current state statutes and
the previous editions are online and you have sent information to
second-hand jobbers and everyone of them has enough outdated, zero-value
statues, they very well may go in the dumpster.  It is not so different
than people cleaning out their basements and dumping their moldy books
at the desk,  expecting a tax break for something that may amount to a
health concern.

And as with all professions, librarians specialize in areas, if not by
design, then by default.  Many librarians do not have extensive
knowledge of rare books. And as with other job titles, there are various
levels of committment among individuals. To make generalizations about
an entire profession reflects on the individual making the
generalizations.

And yes, there is always a backlog in the book repair room because our
mission is provide service to patrons.  I can't prioritize repairing a
book over a person waiting at the desk. Most books needing repair are
free to go out and circulate until work has actually begun on them.

--
Mary Jo Koranda
Circulation Librarian
University of Wisconsin Law Library
mkoranda@xxxxxxxx
608 262 2213
http://library.law.wisc.edu/


*********************************************** The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                  Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 16 Mar 2005 19:08:24 EST
From:    DanceMarathon1@xxxxxxx
Subject: EXHIBITION: Susan Newmark

JOURNALS: Seen and Recalled
ARTIST BOOKS by SUSAN NEWMARK
(a.k.a. Susan Fleminger)
 =A0
Tuesday, March 22- May 15,2005
Balcony Cases
 =A0
Reception:=20
Tuesday, March 22,=20
6-8pm
Trustees Room, Third Floor
 =A0
 Brooklyn Public Library
 Grand Army Plaza
 Brooklyn, New York
 718-230-2100
 http://www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/
 =A0
 Artist: 718-768-5895, sfnarts@xxxxxxx
 =A0
Directions: IRT Seventh Avenue Subway to Grand Army Plaza,=20
Walk up plaza to Library at Eastern Parkway.
 =A0

             ***********************************************
     The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist
                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
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------------------------------

End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 15 Mar 2005 to 16 Mar 2005 (#2005-75)
*****************************************************************



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    The Bonefolder: an e-journal for the bookbinder and book artist

            For all your subscription questions, go to the
                     Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

                 Both at: <http://www.philobiblon.com>
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