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[BKARTS] Smyth-sewn, short-run book



I am a genealogist and designer in Austin, Texas, and I have a dilemma. I am producing a 100-page memoir for a client. The page size is 8-1/2x11. My client wants the book to be durable, with a hard cover and a Smyth-sewn binding so that it will lay flat. Because we will be producing less than 50 copies, we plan to laser print the pages, rather than print them. I am looking for guidelines for producing the signatures needed by the bindery - and any other suggestions anyone might have for such a project, since this is a new one for me.

Thanks.

Susan

BOOK_ARTS-L automatic digest system wrote:
There are 24 messages totalling 1610 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Octavia & Co. Press Webpage
  2. Boxmaking Class in Los Angeles
  3. WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou (8)
  4. FW: book arts list
  5. Reminder: Reading: Opening TOMORROW
  6. Blue Bayou (7)
  7. How to remove clear plastic tape (5)

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 18 Sep 2005 22:34:21 -0600
From:    "Octavia & Co. Press" <JamieJT@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Octavia & Co. Press Webpage

We finally heeded the advice of friends and colleagues alike and got a
new webpage. The old one has also been dismantled and replaced with a
pretty redirect page.


I have been spending time on making sure it is as user friendly as
possible.

Let me know what you think. How long does it take you to download into
the galleries? Does everything fit on your page okay? Critique
me...please!


We are still focused on the esoteric and spiritual genres, but this is
not so obvious from our new format. It had been pointed out to us that
we likely lost a ton of business due to the "octaviaoccult" webpage, so
we'll see how this does. Our ebay link is also not prominent, instead
occupying a subtle link at the bottom of the "limited editions" page.


Thanks for your advice and thoughts.

Robert L. Angus
Octavia & Co. Press

OctaviaPress.Com

(403)-242-0397

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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 01:27:48 EDT
From:    Lisa Deutsch <Lagourmet@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Boxmaking Class in Los Angeles

=20
The Los Angeles Book Arts Center is  Pleased to Present:=20
Saturday, Sept.  24=20
Boxmaking  with Charlene Matthews  =20
Learn to measure, cut,  construct, and cover a drop-spine box and slipcase=20
for your book works.  You=E2=80=99ll also learn variations on this  theme: w=
indow=20
cut-outs and compartments,  and a number of covering tricks that will send=20
you rushing home to immediately  incorporate into your own art and book work=
.=20
9:30am to  4:30pm=20
Class fee $105 =E2=80=93 Nonmembers, $85 =E2=80=93  Members=20
A $25 materials fee payable to the  instructor at class time=20
Please call - (310)  914-1898=20
or visit our website at _www.LABookArts.com_ (http://www.LABookArts.com)  =20
for more info.

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                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 09:35:47 -0400
From:    Paul T Werner <paul.werner@xxxxxxx>
Subject: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

Dear Professor:
I)
A week ago you wrote asking for donations of art supplies for the evacuees from New Orleans: "children and adults now living in shelters , [....], children who are entering the public schools whose budgets are currently overtaxed and overwhelmed, [...] college art students from New Orleans now enrolled [elsewhere], and professional artists who have lost not only their supplies but their life's work."
An admirable request, and yet two memories haunt me: an artist friend of mine who worked with homeless children in New York City once told me the closets in the welfare hotels were bursting with donated art supplies. Why didn't she just hand them out, I asked. Because, she said, her job wasn't to hand out art supplies, it was to teach art. The other is of people in Louisiana dying, dying even now, because there are too many people who think it's not their job to hand out food and water, just to control who gets the food and the water, and the making of art. II)
Absolute Poverty: it's not an ad for a brand of vodka, it' a statistical calculation that defines poverty in terms of "absolute" necessities: food, shelter, clothing. That's a belief for Barbara Bush, not you or me, Professor. People need art, not in the way that they need food or water, but in a way no less important in the long run, and that's the run we're seeing on Louisiana: the first responders were the lobbyists and speculators. Close behind, the social engineers: the churches, activists, the NGOs. With the breakdown of neighborhoods comes a breakdown of social and cultural relations, and the charities, activists and government are now competing to define what new relations will replace them as surely as charities in Old New England once bid for "their" poor. I think we all know, now, it's not whether you give, but to whom: Pat Robertson, or the Red Cross, or to MoveOn.org. The issue isn't whether there must be food and water and housing in New Orleans, and culture. The issue is: what kind of each, for whom, and who decides? III)
And what worries me about your call is the implication, which lies behind so much high culture in America, that there is no culture among the poor, that they're merely vessels to be filled, with more or less benevolence, by more-or-less well-meaning social workers, government agencies or art professors. From there, of course, it's just a step to the actual destruction of native habitats and cultures, their replacement by "something better." Teach a man to fish and you have him fed for life. Teach a man to mix oil paints and you have him hooked for life on a charge account at the art supply store. And will that make him a better artist?


Many years ago a friend of mine, an artist from New Orleans, told me of a bridge somewhere in the Delta, he wouldn't tell me where. Before you cross this bridge you walk down under it, and stick your hands in deep, and you come up with blue mud, the deepest, bluest blue you've ever seen. Maybe he needs some help, now, but I'm going to wait to be asked.


Collegially Yours,


Paul T Werner, New York
http://theorangepress.com

WOID: A journal of visual language
"Museum Inc.: Inside the Global Art World" (November 1, from Prickly Paradigm Press)


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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 07:22:01 -0700
From:    Hal Truschke <fineptg@xxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

Paul T Werner,

   Following the tragic occurrence of this hurricane, the last thing =
that is
needed right now is another pompous diatribe. We already have =
politicians
involved so please leave this sort of thing to the professionals, okay?
--Hal Truschke

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                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 10:44:41 -0400
From:    "Dubansky, Mindell" <Mindell.Dubansky@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: FW: book arts list

Paul Brubaker asked me to post this for him. He's making a northeast =
trip to work on some equipment and wants to make the best use of his =
trip. He has done work on our Kensol and one of us got a overhauled =
board shears from him. It's good to check in on his site if you need any =
equipment.=20

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Brubaker [mailto:paul@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 10:36 AM
To: Dubansky, Mindell
Subject: Re: book arts list


I'm planning a trip from PA to Northampton MA on September 26 doing = deliveries and service=20 work as we go if anyone needs anything like board shear adjusting, = equipment, etc. Please look at my website. -- Paul=20

Bindery Tools, LLC
285 Lausch Rd. (Mailing)
Denver PA 17517
717-733-0115 (phone / fax)
www.binderytools.com
Paul Brubaker   President

Mindell
could you make changes as needed and add to the list for me ?
all I got is the email from you !=20

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                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 09:45:40 -0500
From:    Mark Hill <paperraven@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

I have to agree with Mr. Werner.  I believe that when there are thousands of
people who need food, water, medical supplies it is arrogant (in the least)
to think you are helping anyone by sending them art supplies.  It might help
you sleep at night thinking that you helped the people of New Orleans by
sending you extra sketch pads and pencils, but you would be delusional.

At this point, food, water and medical supplies are what the Katrina victims
need the most.  Send your art supplies, if you are still determined that
this is going to help anyone,  when they are fed and housed.


And "leave this sort of thing to the professionals?" The professionals (government) have already shown their miserable failure at responding to this tragedy. We have been shown quite well that we can not depend on the government.

Mark Hill
Paper Raven Bookworks
www.paperraven.com


-----Original Message----- From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Paul T Werner Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 8:36 AM To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Subject: [BKARTS] WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

Dear Professor:

I)
A week ago you wrote asking for donations of art supplies for the
evacuees from New Orleans: "children and adults now living in
shelters , [....], children who are entering the public schools whose
budgets are currently overtaxed and overwhelmed, [...] college art
students from New Orleans now enrolled [elsewhere], and professional
artists who have lost not only their supplies but their life's work."

An admirable request, and yet two memories haunt me: an artist friend
of mine who worked with homeless children in New York City once told
me the closets in the welfare hotels were bursting with donated art
supplies. Why didn't she just hand them out, I asked. Because, she
said, her job wasn't to hand out art supplies, it was to teach art.
The other is of people in Louisiana dying, dying even now, because
there are too many people who think it's not their job to hand out
food and water, just to control who gets the food and the water, and
the making of art.

II)
Absolute Poverty: it's not an ad for a brand of vodka, it' a
statistical calculation that defines poverty in terms of "absolute"
necessities: food, shelter, clothing. That's a belief for Barbara
Bush, not you or me, Professor. People need art, not in the way that
they need food or water, but in a way no less important in the long
run, and that's the run we're seeing on Louisiana: the first
responders were the lobbyists and speculators. Close behind, the
social engineers: the churches, activists, the NGOs. With the
breakdown of neighborhoods comes a breakdown of social and cultural
relations, and the charities, activists and government are now
competing to define what new relations will replace them as surely as
charities in Old New England once bid for "their" poor. I think we all
know, now, it's not whether you give, but to whom: Pat Robertson, or
the Red Cross, or to MoveOn.org. The issue isn't whether there must be
food and water and housing in New Orleans, and culture. The issue is:
what kind of each, for whom, and who decides?

III)
And what worries me about your call is the implication, which lies
behind so much high culture in America, that there is no culture among
the poor, that they're merely vessels to be filled, with more or less
benevolence, by more-or-less well-meaning social workers, government
agencies or art professors. From there, of course, it's just a step to
the actual destruction of native habitats and cultures, their
replacement by "something better." Teach a man to fish and you have
him fed for life. Teach a man to mix oil paints and you have him
hooked for life on a charge account at the art supply store. And will
that make him a better artist?

Many years ago a friend of mine, an artist from New Orleans, told me
of a bridge somewhere in the Delta, he wouldn't tell me where. Before
you cross this bridge you walk down under it, and stick your hands in
deep, and you come up with blue mud, the deepest, bluest blue you've
ever seen. Maybe he needs some help, now, but I'm going to wait to be
asked.


Collegially Yours,


Paul T Werner, New York
http://theorangepress.com

WOID: A journal of visual language
"Museum Inc.: Inside the Global Art World" (November 1, from Prickly
Paradigm Press)

             ***********************************************
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2005

             For all your subscription questions, go to the
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          See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
             ***********************************************

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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 10:55:17 -0400
From:    Michael Joseph <mjoseph@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Reminder: Reading: Opening TOMORROW

Reminder that there will be a reception to mark the opening of BEYOND
WORDS, an exhibition of Ilse Schreiber-Noll's artists' books at the John
Cotton Dana Library, Rutgers-Newark, on Tuesday, September 20, 2005,
5:30-8:00. Schreiber-Noll creates one-of-a-kind books as well as limited
editions, often in collaboration with poets. A frequent collaborator of
Schreiber-Noll's, the poet, Galway Kinnell, will read from his recent
translation, "The Essential Rilke," the evening of the opening.

Between 1960 and 2000, Galway Kinnell published fifteen books of poetry.
In 1983, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and shared the American Book
Award for his "Selected Poems, 1982." The following year, he was awarded
the MacArthur Foundation Award (which MacArthur laureate, Jim Collins, is
kind enough to tell us in today TIMES, is given for creativity and not
mere genius). He has also published a novel, "Black Light" (1966) a
collection of edited interviews, "Walking Down the Stairs" (1978), and
several translations of poetry, including "The Essential Rilke" (1999),
Yves Bonefoy's "The Early Poems, 1947-1959" (1977), "The Poems of Francois
Villon"  (1965, rev. 1977), Yvan Goll's "Lackawanna Elegy" (1970) and Rene
Hardy's "Bitter Victory" (1956). Kinnell also provided illustrations to
the children's book, "The Snow Rabbits," by Pati Hill (1962).

In addition to his collaborations with Schreiber-Noll, Galway Kinnell has
generously provided poems for many eminent artistic and fine presses: The
Rara Avis Press, The Perishable Press, The Red Ozier Press, The Firefly
Press, The Salmon Run Press, The Aralia Press and The Janus Press to name
only a few.

Kinnell has been called "one of the most powerful and moving poets of his
generation." Patrick Keane has praised his poetry as "an elementary poetry
-- a poetry of dark woods and snow; of wind and fire and stars; of bone
and blood. His subjects are perennial: love illumined and made more
precious by the omnipresence of death." The poet, Hank Lazer, has also
singled out Kinnell's heightened, heroic engagement with life and death,
characterizing the best of his poetry as Rilkean. Kinnell's poetry enters
the same "crucial territory in the life / interface," he declares, "by his
own vision."

Lazer offers the following poem from "Mortal Acts, Mortal Words" (1980) as
an example of Kinnell at his Rilkean best:

I say "God"; I believe
Rather, in a music of grace
That we hear, sometimes, playing to us
From the other side of happiness.
When we hear it, when it flows
Through our bodies, it lets us live
These days lighted by their vanity
Worshipping--as the other animals do,
Who live and die in the spirit
Of the end--that backward-spreading
Brightness. And it speaks in notes struck
Or caressed or blown or plucked
Off our own bodies: "remember
Existence already remembers
The flush upon it you will have been,
You who have reached out ahead
And taken up some of the black dust
We become, souvenir
Which glitters already in the bones of your hand."


[my quotation marks replace italics in last usage]


Alternatively, Harold Bloom has praised Kinnell's "descriptive powers,"
characterizing them as possessing "a Whitmanesque amplitude." Poet, Donald
Hall, writing from a similar point of view, has celebrated
Kinnell'facility for absorbing and mimicking the nature of the world, and
for finding profundity as well as comedy in the common particulars of
living, noting "when Galway Kinnell puts his feet into old shoes bought at
the Salvation Army, he does not fill them; the shoes fill him."

Kinnell's reading will begin at 6:00, and it is advisable to arrive early.
Directions to the Dana Library are available on its website:
http://www.newark.rutgers.edu/maps/index.php?sId=directions


Best, Michael Joseph

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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 08:03:01 -0700
From:    Hal Truschke <fineptg@xxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

Dear Mark,

By "leave this sort of thing to the professionals" I was referring to
pompous diatribes, not aid. It was ironically implying that politicians are
professional producers of pompous diatribes.


  Yes, the hurricane victims need medical aid, food, clothes, and housing
foremost but what I believe Mr. Warner was doing was using the tragic event
as an opportunity to sound off on his personal philosophy on poverty. That
struck me as a sort of intellectual looting and we've had enough of that
too. Best, Hal

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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 10:03:18 -0500
From:    Sally Jackson <serifm@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

There is one area in which I have to disagree with Paul, and that concerns the children. Members of at least one calligraphy guild I know of (Houston) are collecting art supplies for those still in shelters. One of the members, who is a former social worker, is stocking a room with paints and paper and clay and all sorts of supplies for the kids to use while they are waiting for housing. Our city, Fort Worth, Texas, is enrolling the children of these hurricane victims without regard to the usual paperwork requirements. We work with a teacher from a small school district, and, as we are in the process of retiring and closing our studio, the supplies that we are not going to use during retirement will go to this school district.

Obviously I'm preaching to the choir when I say that art is a necessary thing, and it can be healing. It is likely that the adult artists will find a way to cope, but sending art supplies for the use of children is a far different thing in my opinion. That the government is going to do only that which is a political necessity is quite clear, and given the bent of the current administration, I don't think is will include art supplies for the schools.

Sally Jackson

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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 11:46:40 -0400
From:    Sandy Olson <ccrow@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

Hello, You know not of what you speak. There is very much evidence that =
children can most often address trauma by drawing. The sooner you get =
them the tools for doing this the better off they are. When they are =
sitting in shelters all day they need to have creative tools to help =
them process what has happened to them Now is exactly the time they need =
these things. ARGGGG. Sandy Olson
From: Mark Hill=20
  To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx=20
  Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 10:45 AM
  Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou


I have to agree with Mr. Werner. I believe that when there are = thousands of people who need food, water, medical supplies it is arrogant (in the = least) to think you are helping anyone by sending them art supplies. It = might help you sleep at night thinking that you helped the people of New Orleans = by sending you extra sketch pads and pencils, but you would be = delusional.

  At this point, food, water and medical supplies are what the Katrina =
victims
  need the most.  Send your art supplies, if you are still determined =
that
  this is going to help anyone,  when they are fed and housed.


And "leave this sort of thing to the professionals?" The = professionals (government) have already shown their miserable failure at responding = to this tragedy. We have been shown quite well that we can not depend on = the government.

  Mark Hill
  Paper Raven Bookworks
  www.paperraven.com


-----Original Message----- From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of = Paul T Werner Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 8:36 AM To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Subject: [BKARTS] WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

Dear Professor:

  I)
  A week ago you wrote asking for donations of art supplies for the
  evacuees from New Orleans: "children and adults now living in
  shelters , [....], children who are entering the public schools whose
  budgets are currently overtaxed and overwhelmed, [...] college art
  students from New Orleans now enrolled [elsewhere], and professional
  artists who have lost not only their supplies but their life's work."

  An admirable request, and yet two memories haunt me: an artist friend
  of mine who worked with homeless children in New York City once told
  me the closets in the welfare hotels were bursting with donated art
  supplies. Why didn't she just hand them out, I asked. Because, she
  said, her job wasn't to hand out art supplies, it was to teach art.
  The other is of people in Louisiana dying, dying even now, because
  there are too many people who think it's not their job to hand out
  food and water, just to control who gets the food and the water, and
  the making of art.

  II)
  Absolute Poverty: it's not an ad for a brand of vodka, it' a
  statistical calculation that defines poverty in terms of "absolute"
  necessities: food, shelter, clothing. That's a belief for Barbara
  Bush, not you or me, Professor. People need art, not in the way that
  they need food or water, but in a way no less important in the long
  run, and that's the run we're seeing on Louisiana: the first
  responders were the lobbyists and speculators. Close behind, the
  social engineers: the churches, activists, the NGOs. With the
  breakdown of neighborhoods comes a breakdown of social and cultural
  relations, and the charities, activists and government are now
  competing to define what new relations will replace them as surely as
  charities in Old New England once bid for "their" poor. I think we all
  know, now, it's not whether you give, but to whom: Pat Robertson, or
  the Red Cross, or to MoveOn.org. The issue isn't whether there must be
  food and water and housing in New Orleans, and culture. The issue is:
  what kind of each, for whom, and who decides?

  III)
  And what worries me about your call is the implication, which lies
  behind so much high culture in America, that there is no culture among
  the poor, that they're merely vessels to be filled, with more or less
  benevolence, by more-or-less well-meaning social workers, government
  agencies or art professors. From there, of course, it's just a step to
  the actual destruction of native habitats and cultures, their
  replacement by "something better." Teach a man to fish and you have
  him fed for life. Teach a man to mix oil paints and you have him
  hooked for life on a charge account at the art supply store. And will
  that make him a better artist?

  Many years ago a friend of mine, an artist from New Orleans, told me
  of a bridge somewhere in the Delta, he wouldn't tell me where. Before
  you cross this bridge you walk down under it, and stick your hands in
  deep, and you come up with blue mud, the deepest, bluest blue you've
  ever seen. Maybe he needs some help, now, but I'm going to wait to be
  asked.


Collegially Yours,


  Paul T Werner, New York
  http://theorangepress.com

  WOID: A journal of visual language
  "Museum Inc.: Inside the Global Art World" (November 1, from Prickly
  Paradigm Press)

               ***********************************************
  Edelpappband / "Millimeter" Binding Bind-O-Rama, Entry Deadline - =
October 1,
  2005

               For all your subscription questions, go to the
                        Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.

            See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
               ***********************************************

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October 1, 2005
                                     =20
               For all your subscription questions, go to the
                        Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                     =20
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                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 12:21:45 -0400
From:    Leslie Miller <zandeerae@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou

A pre service student art teacher from Philadelphia went down while in the
Super dome in Houston; brought supplies from her own studio and
boughtsupplies on her own. Set up in an area a makeshift class room . The
children flocked to her , using the supplies appropriately, sharing and when
they were done cleaned up without the usual problems. They were respectful,
and adoring of her and what she was doing. She had to go back for her own
school year.  I sent the post around to the art teachers I know and several
generous friends, who had already done much in sending money and supplies.
They contacted her and basically funded the work she had done. Those
children drew and painted and made sculptures, sometimes of what they were
living though, sometimes the world they preferred. It gave the children a
positive way to work through things in their own very real language of art
and gave the caretakers some respite.

Yes they need water , food, shelter and clothing, but for children, and many
adults , without art, life is less than human.
Les


Leslie A.Miller ORIGINAL PAPERCUTS Midway Studios 15 Channel Center Street, #309 Boston, MA 02210 and www.fountainstreetstudios.com zandeerae@xxxxxxxxxxx


-----Original Message----- From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of Sandy Olson Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 11:47 AM To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Subject: Re: WOID #XIII-41. Blue Bayou


Hello, You know not of what you speak. There is very much evidence that children can most often address trauma by drawing. The sooner you get them the tools for doing this the better off they are. When they are sitting in shelters all day they need to have creative tools to help them process what has happened to them Now is exactly the time they need these things. ARGGGG. Sandy Olson From: Mark Hill

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Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 13:03:36 -0400
From:    Paul T Werner <paul.werner@xxxxxxx>
Subject: Blue Bayou


I believe Mr. Warner was doing was using the tragic event
as an opportunity to sound off on his personal philosophy on

poverty.


My article referenced serious arguments about the roots of poverty and the system of social welfare, many of which have been developed by respected scholars who have been my friends for years. I had a long discussion with one such scholar, a tenured professor of Social Policy, before posting my article. Of course I take full responsibility for the final result. I realize this can be confusing for those among us whose idea of an authoritative source is Rush Limbaugh.

Incidentally, my article does not say that art is useless; or that traumatized children cannot benefit from art activities. And from all the reports I've received the response from Houston, at all levels of the educational system, has been exemplary.
Hey, kids: can you say "Needs Assessment?



Paul T Werner, New York http://theorangepress.com

WOID: A journal of visual language
"Museum, Inc.: Inside the Global Art Worl" (November 1 from Prickly Paradigm Press)


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Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 11:40:57 -0600
From:    "Octavia & Co. Press" <JamieJT@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Blue Bayou

I wrote the following essay in my freshman year at Mount Royal College.
It's along a similar vein. Send the supplies, and the food, and the
water, and the love.


Robert L. Angus

Octavia & Co. Press

OctaviaPress.Com

(403)-242-0397


Answer to Jo Goodwin Parker's "What is Poverty"


I am experienced in recognizing the psychology of the poor. I know the
vacant expressions of those who have lost hope and have traded their
aspirations for humiliation. I have watched close friends pawn their
bodies to feed the crutch of their addictions. I know that there is
escape from destitution, for I have supported my ambition with
creativity, resourcefulness, and most important of all, persistence.


Jo Goodwin Parker, in her essay entitled "What is Poverty?" writes,
"Look at us with an angry heart, anger that will help you help me." I
can relate to her frustration, but it is her prison of inertia which
invokes my anger. Her inability to act in spite of her humiliation
drives my anger. She adds, "Others like me are all around you", and this
further fuels my indignation.


I have experienced the same impoverishment that Ms. Parker describes:
the cutting smell of urine and sour milk, cold baths with acrid soap,
'friendly' neighbors content to neglect or abuse my sister and I while
our mother was away. I know all too well that poverty is, "cooking
without food and cleaning without soap", but I was able to use the
discarded stub of a pencil to write my first poem. I was able to dig in
the trashcans for bottles and unwanted treasures to sell. I looked for
opportunity, even when it took the form of charitable alms of food and
clothing. The poor may not have money, but they do have a fortune in
time: time to master skills, time to write, paint, or sculpt - even when
the pencil is a dull nub, the paint is made from egg whites and tea, and
the sculpture is cast from mud.


Resourcefulness is not an option for Ms. Parker, who justifies her lack
of ambition with the "acid that drips on pride until pride is worn away"
and the "chisel that chips on honor until honor is worn away." She can
"dream of a time when there is money", but has overlooked the time to
make money from her dreams.


When we are born, we have no cloths, no possessions, and are ignorant of
the judgment and criticism of others. When we die, we return to this
natural human condition, taking little comfort in valueless material
objects, and finding no humiliation in judgment and criticism. Poverty
is this natural state, bereft of social value and material comforts. We
are supplied with creativity, resourcefulness, and persistence of
action. Every animal is afforded these, and those that do not must rely
on the charity of others to provide them. Ms. Parker has no faith in
persistence, instead choosing to believe in despotism, defeat and
despair. She asks if we could persist year after year. In reply, the
late President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge is quoted as
saying: "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will
not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius
will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the
world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone
are omnipotent."


The poor may be without education, employment, or the luxuries which are
commonplace for many of us, but they do have the most important
qualities inherent in every human being. These are the intangible assets
that each one of us has, regardless of our station or qualifications.
The ability to create, to exploit opportunities, to take action and to
persist until a goal is reached are the wealth of mankind. There is
nothing more valuable than these, except the omnipotent power of
sentience to put them to use. Ms. Parker asks, "What is poverty?" My
answer is that Poverty is the ability to rise above the natural human
condition through creative, resourceful, and persistent action.

***********************************************
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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 11:35:57 -0700
From:    Hal Truschke <fineptg@xxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Blue Bayou

"My article referenced serious arguments..." --Paul Werner

I don't believe that your presentation of a second-hand story about a =
friend
seeing art supplies kept behind locked doors of a "welfare hotel" =
qualifies
as a serious or scholarly argument on the subject. It brought to mind a
similar tale often used by Ronald Reagan about having "heard about" =
welfare
mothers using food stamps for buying vodka. Reagan, Rush, and yourself =
share
a similar technique of attempting to simplify complex issues through
manufactured parables and bombast in order to elicit knee-jerk reaction.
This is hardly scholarship.=20

In conclusion of your original post you wrote, referring to a friend in =
New
Orleans: "Maybe he needs some help but I'm going to wait to be asked." =
The
callous indifference and lack of compassion displayed in such a =
statement is
remarkable. --Hal Truschke

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                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 15:23:51 -0400
From:    Sandy Olson <ccrow@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Blue Bayou

Just to clear the air, which seems to need to be done alot here =
recently, My comments about the usefulness of art materials for children =
post trauma were not refuting Mr. Werner's comment which I di not even =
receive but rather some of the later responses. I do wonder why every =
discussion lately has to end up in insults.=20
  ----- Original Message -----=20
  From: Paul T Werner=20
  To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx=20
  Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 1:03 PM
  Subject: Blue Bayou


> I believe Mr. Warner was doing was using the tragic event > as an opportunity to sound off on his personal philosophy on=20 poverty.=20

My article referenced serious arguments about the roots of poverty and =

  the system of social welfare, many of which have been developed by=20
  respected scholars who have been my friends for years. I had a long=20
  discussion with one such scholar, a tenured professor of Social=20
  Policy, before posting my article. Of course I take full=20
  responsibility for the final result. I realize this can be confusing=20
  for those among us whose idea of an authoritative source is Rush=20
  Limbaugh.

  Incidentally, my article does not say that art is useless; or that=20
  traumatized children cannot benefit from art activities. And from all=20
  the reports I've received the response from Houston, at all levels of=20
  the educational system, has been exemplary.
  Hey, kids: can you say "Needs Assessment?


Paul T Werner, New York http://theorangepress.com

  WOID: A journal of visual language
  "Museum, Inc.: Inside the Global Art Worl" (November 1 from Prickly=20
  Paradigm Press)

               ***********************************************
  Edelpappband / "Millimeter" Binding Bind-O-Rama, Entry Deadline - =
October 1, 2005
                                     =20
               For all your subscription questions, go to the
                        Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                     =20
            See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
               ***********************************************

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                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
          See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 15:25:04 -0400
From:    Sandy Olson <ccrow@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Blue Bayou

Thank you Robert.
  ----- Original Message -----=20
  From: Octavia & Co. Press=20
  To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx=20
  Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 1:40 PM
  Subject: Re: Blue Bayou


I wrote the following essay in my freshman year at Mount Royal = College. It's along a similar vein. Send the supplies, and the food, and the water, and the love.=20

Robert L. Angus

Octavia & Co. Press

OctaviaPress.Com

(403)-242-0397


Answer to Jo Goodwin Parker's "What is Poverty"


  I am experienced in recognizing the psychology of the poor. I know the
  vacant expressions of those who have lost hope and have traded their
  aspirations for humiliation. I have watched close friends pawn their
  bodies to feed the crutch of their addictions. I know that there is
  escape from destitution, for I have supported my ambition with
  creativity, resourcefulness, and most important of all, persistence.=20

  Jo Goodwin Parker, in her essay entitled "What is Poverty?" writes,
  "Look at us with an angry heart, anger that will help you help me." I
  can relate to her frustration, but it is her prison of inertia which
  invokes my anger. Her inability to act in spite of her humiliation
  drives my anger. She adds, "Others like me are all around you", and =
this
  further fuels my indignation.=20

  I have experienced the same impoverishment that Ms. Parker describes:
  the cutting smell of urine and sour milk, cold baths with acrid soap,
  'friendly' neighbors content to neglect or abuse my sister and I while
  our mother was away. I know all too well that poverty is, "cooking
  without food and cleaning without soap", but I was able to use the
  discarded stub of a pencil to write my first poem. I was able to dig =
in
  the trashcans for bottles and unwanted treasures to sell. I looked for
  opportunity, even when it took the form of charitable alms of food and
  clothing. The poor may not have money, but they do have a fortune in
  time: time to master skills, time to write, paint, or sculpt - even =
when
  the pencil is a dull nub, the paint is made from egg whites and tea, =
and
  the sculpture is cast from mud.=20

  Resourcefulness is not an option for Ms. Parker, who justifies her =
lack
  of ambition with the "acid that drips on pride until pride is worn =
away"
  and the "chisel that chips on honor until honor is worn away." She can
  "dream of a time when there is money", but has overlooked the time to
  make money from her dreams.=20

  When we are born, we have no cloths, no possessions, and are ignorant =
of
  the judgment and criticism of others. When we die, we return to this
  natural human condition, taking little comfort in valueless material
  objects, and finding no humiliation in judgment and criticism. Poverty
  is this natural state, bereft of social value and material comforts. =
We
  are supplied with creativity, resourcefulness, and persistence of
  action. Every animal is afforded these, and those that do not must =
rely
  on the charity of others to provide them. Ms. Parker has no faith in
  persistence, instead choosing to believe in despotism, defeat and
  despair. She asks if we could persist year after year. In reply, the
  late President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge is quoted as
  saying:=20
  "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will
  not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius
  will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; =
the
  world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination =
alone
  are omnipotent."

  The poor may be without education, employment, or the luxuries which =
are
  commonplace for many of us, but they do have the most important
  qualities inherent in every human being. These are the intangible =
assets
  that each one of us has, regardless of our station or qualifications.
  The ability to create, to exploit opportunities, to take action and to
  persist until a goal is reached are the wealth of mankind. There is
  nothing more valuable than these, except the omnipotent power of
  sentience to put them to use. Ms. Parker asks, "What is poverty?" My
  answer is that Poverty is the ability to rise above the natural human
  condition through creative, resourceful, and persistent action.

               ***********************************************
  Edelpappband / "Millimeter" Binding Bind-O-Rama, Entry Deadline - =
October 1, 2005
                                     =20
               For all your subscription questions, go to the
                        Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                     =20
            See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
               ***********************************************

             ***********************************************
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                                   =20
             For all your subscription questions, go to the
                      Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
                                   =20
          See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
             ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Mon, 19 Sep 2005 15:33:41 -0400
From:    Matthew Garelick <mgarelick@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Blue Bayou

Thank you, Hal. You said it all, and much better than I was going to.

Matthew


Hal Truschke wrote:



"My article referenced serious arguments..." --Paul Werner

I don't believe that your presentation of a second-hand story about a friend
seeing art supplies kept behind locked doors of a "welfare hotel" qualifies
as a serious or scholarly argument on the subject. It brought to mind a
similar tale often used by Ronald Reagan about having "heard about" welfare
mothers using food stamps for buying vodka. Reagan, Rush, and yourself share
a similar technique of attempting to simplify complex issues through
manufactured parables and bombast in order to elicit knee-jerk reaction.
This is hardly scholarship.


In conclusion of your original post you wrote, referring to a friend in New
Orleans: "Maybe he needs some help but I'm going to wait to be asked." The
callous indifference and lack of compassion displayed in such a statement is
remarkable. --Hal Truschke









***********************************************
Edelpappband / "Millimeter" Binding Bind-O-Rama, Entry Deadline - October 1, 2005
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
***********************************************



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