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Subject: Mold health hazards

Mold health hazards

From: Joseph D. Henry <jdhenrya>
Date: Tuesday, September 12, 1995
More information about the dangers of book and paper molds.  The
following article is from the Cleveland Plain Dealer (9/12/95):

    Fungus Blamed in Deaths of Babies

    Health official say they are 99% certain that a fungus has caused 14
    cases of a rare bleeding lung illness in babies in Cleveland...since
    1993.

    Researchers...working with the CDC in Atlanta have concluded that
    the fungus Stachybotrys atra is the cause.  The black, slimy mold
    grows only under very wet conditions and only on cellulose materials
    such as wood and paper.

    14 cases of the disease, known as pulmonary hemosiderosis, were
    reported in the eastern part of Cleveland...from January 1993 to
    January 1995.  2 of the 14 infants died.  The main symptoms are
    bleeding in the lungs that causes the babies to cough up blood.

    The risk apparently increases when cold weather arrives.
    Heating systems can spread the fungal spores throughout the
    house.

    Health officials said the danger could be minimized by:  1)
    Correcting all sources of water damage in the home, especially
    those that produce puddles near wood products such as ceiling
    tiles, wallpaper, and plasterboard; [and] 2) Cleaning up
    water-damaged material, discarding as much as possible.
    Otherwise, scrub the surface with a diluted bleach solution
    while wearing protective gloves (the fungus is a skin irritant
    as well).

JD Henry
Graduate, U.T. Austin GSLIS PCS

                                  ***
                  Conservation DistList Instance 9:25
               Distributed: Thursday, September 14, 1995
                        Message Id: cdl-9-25-002
                                  ***
Received on Tuesday, 12 September, 1995

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