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Subject: Online courses

Online courses

From: Helen Alten <helen<-a>
Date: Friday, February 22, 2008
March Online Classes at <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org>

    Preservation Environments
    Disaster Planning
    Volunteer Programs
    Collections Management Policies

Details:

MS209: Collections Management Policies for Museums and Related
    Institutions
Mar 3-May 9, 2008
Price: $425
Instructor: Bill Tompkins
Location:
    <URL:http://museumclasses.org/training/trol_classes_ms209.html>

    The Northern States Conservation Center
    <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org> is pleased to add
    Collections Management Policies for Museums and Related
    Institutions to our online collection management curriculum.
    This popular Smithsonian workshop is now available online at
    <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org>

    Acquiring and holding collections impose specific legal, ethical
    and professional obligations. Museums must ensure proper
    management, preservation and use of their collections. A
    well-crafted collections management policy is key to collections
    stewardship. Collections Management Policies for Museums and
    Related Institutions helps participants develop policies that
    meet professional and legal standards for collections
    management.

    Collections Management Policies for Museums and Related
    Institutions teaches the practical skills and knowledge needed
    to write and implement such a policy. The course covers the
    essential components and issues a policy should address. It also
    highlights the role of the policy in carrying out a museum's
    mission and guiding stewardship decisions. Participants are
    expected to draft collections management policies.

    Course Textbook:

        John E. Simmons, Things Great and Small: Collections
        Management Policies, American Association of Museums, 2006,
        $40 non-member, $30 member, 208 pages, ISBN: 1-933253-03-7,
        available from the AAM bookstore

    Course Outline:

        The Principles of Collections Management Collections
        Stewardship: The Role of a Collections Management Policy
        Policy Versus Procedure Issues to Consider When Developing a
        Collections Management Policy Essential Components of a
        Collections Management Policy

            Statement of Purpose
            Statement of Authority
            Definition and Scope of Collections
            Acquisition and Accessioning
            Deaccessioning and Disposal
            Preservation
            Collections Information
            Inventory
            Risk Management and Security
            Access
            Loans
            Intellectual Property Rights Management
            Staff Responsibility / Ethics

        Monitoring and Revision
        Potential Problems
        Emerging Issues
        Drafting a Collections Management Policy

    Logistics: Participants in Collections Management Policies work
    through sections at their own pace. Instructor Bill Tompkins is
    available for scheduled email support. Materials and resources
    include online literature, textbook readings, slide lectures and
    dialog between students and online chats led by the instructor.
    The course is limited to 20 participants.

    Please sign up at <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org> and pay at
    <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org/tas/tas.html> If you have
    trouble with either, please contact Helen Alten at
    helen<-a t->collectioncare< . >org

    The Instructor:

        William G. (Bill) Tompkins is the national collections
        coordinator for the Smithsonian Institution. Bill serves as
        a principal advisor to senior Smithsonian management and
        staff on collections-management policies, procedures and
        standards. He develops, implements and interprets
        Smithsonian collections management standards. This includes
        reviewing and approving the policies of the Smithsonian's
        individual museums to make sure collections are maintained
        according to policy, professional standards and legal
        obligations. Previously, Bill was assistant director of the
        Smithsonian's Office of the Registrar. He is also a former
        collections manager at the National Museum of American
        History. With nearly thirty years experience in the museum
        profession, Bill regularly speaks at professional meetings,
        workshops and university programs.

MS205/6: Disaster Plan Research and Writing
Mar 17-May 16, 2008
Price: $425
Instructor: Terri Schindel
Location:
    <URL:http://museumclasses.org/training/trol_classes_ms205.html>

    Every museum needs to be prepared for fires, floods, chemical
    spills, tornadoes, hurricanes and other disasters. But surveys
    show 80 percent lack trained staff, emergency-preparedness plans
    for their collections, or both. Disaster Plan Research and
    Writing begins with the creation of disaster-preparedness teams,
    the importance of ongoing planning, employee safety, board
    participation and insurance. Participants will learn everything
    they need to draft their own disaster-preparedness plans. They
    also will be required to incorporate colleagues in team-building
    exercises.

    A written disaster-preparedness plan is not only a good idea,
    it's also a requirement for accreditation. In the second half of
    the course, instructor Terri Schindel reviews and provides input
    as participants write plans that outline the procedures to
    follow in various emergencies. The completed plan prepares
    museums physically and mentally to handle emergencies that can
    harm vulnerable and irreplaceable collections. You will have a
    completed institutional disaster-preparedness and response plan
    at the end of the course.

    Course Outline:

        Introduction to Disaster Planning
        Disaster Team
        Risk Assessment and Management
        Health and Safety
        Insurance
        Documentation
        Prioritizing Collections
        Writing the Disaster Preparedness Plan
        Emergency Procedures
        Disaster Response
        Emergency Procedures - Recovery
        Emergency Procedures - Salvage
        Emergency Procedures - Salvage Techniques and Guidelines
        Emergency supplies and location of regional resources
        Appendices: What to put in them
        Next steps: planning drills and further resources
        Conclusion

    Logistics: Participants in MS205/6: Disaster Plan Research and
    Writing work at their own pace through eight sections.
    Instructor Terri Schindel is available at scheduled times for
    email support. Opportunities for interaction include forums and
    scheduled online chats. Each section includes a written
    assignment that becomes support material for drafting an actual
    disaster-preparedness plan. Materials include online readings,
    lecture notes, links to relevant web sites and handouts. The
    course is limited to 20 participants.

    Required Textbook: Disaster Plan Research and Writing uses the
    required textbook Steal This Handbook! A Template for Creating a
    Museum's Emergency Preparedness Plan, which is available for
    purchase at <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org/tas/tas.html>

    Please sign up at <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org> and pay at
    <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org/tas/tas.html> If you have
    trouble with either, please contact Helen Alten at
    helen<-a t->collectioncare< . >org

    The Instructor:

        Terri Schindel, graduated from the Courtauld Art Institute,
        University of London with a concentration in textile
        conservation. She has assisted small and medium sized
        museums in writing disaster plans for more than a decade and
        helped develop national standards for disaster-preparedness
        materials. Ms. Schindel specializes in collection care and
        preventive conservation and works regularly with small,
        rural and tribal museums.

MS211: Preservation Environments
Mar 3-Mar 28, 2008
Price: $425
Instructor: Ernest A. Conrad
Location:
    <URL:http://museumclasses.org/training/trol_classes_ms211.html>

    Discover what an HVAC is and why some work better in one type of
    structure than another. Learn how to use a psychrometric chart
    to predict potential problems in your museum. Find out about
    LEED buildings and the future of museums. Become familiar with
    MERV, HEPA, and other terms used by your building engineers.
    Preservation Environments is essential for any institution
    considering a new building - and any institution planning to
    expand or rebuild an existing one. Participants learn the
    advantages and disadvantages of numerous methods of temperature
    and humidity control. Preservation Environments does not try to
    turn museum professionals into engineers. Rather, it arms them
    with the knowledge they need to work with engineers and
    maintenance professionals.

    Course Outline

        Introduction
        Climate Control Basics
        Monitoring and Psychrometrics
        Water The Enemy
        Preservation Tomorrow
        Conclusion

    Logistics: Participants in Preservation Environments work at
    their own pace through six sections and interact through online
    chats. Instructor Ernest Conrad is available at scheduled times
    for email support. Preservation Environments includes online
    literature, slide lectures and student-teacher/group-teacher
    dialog. The course is limited to 20 participants.

    Preservation Environments runs four weeks. Sign up at
    <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org> and pay for the course at
    <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org/tas/tas.html>. If you have
    trouble completing an on-line order, please contact Helen Alten
    helen<-a t->collectioncare< . >org or Eric Swanson
    <eric<-a t->collectioncare< . >org>

    The Instructor:

        For over 20 years, Mr. Conrad has focused on environmental
        issues. He is president of Landmark Facilities Group, Inc.,
        an engineering firm specializing in environmental systems
        for museums, libraries, archives and historic facilities. A
        licensed mechanical engineer in several states, Mr. Conrad
        holds a bachelor's degree in civil engineering and a
        master's in environmental engineering from Drexel
        University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

        A well-respected and honored member of many professional
        organizations, his greatest contribution to the preservation
        field was the development of environmental guidelines for
        engineers who work on museums, libraries and archives. The
        American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and
        Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) publishes
        standards in the areas of HVAC and refrigeration. Mr. Conrad
        recently co-authored the ASHRAE Applications Handbook
        "Chapter 20: Museums, Libraries and Archives." For the first
        time, there are guidelines specific to our needs in the
        engineering literature.

        Mr. Conrad has studied environments and designed special
        climate control systems throughout the United States for
        clients as well-known as the National Gallery of Art,
        Library of Congress, The Frick Collection, Getty
        Conservation Institute, The Pierpont Morgan Library,
        National Trust for Historic Preservation, and National Park
        Service. He has a special interest in house museums and how
        climate affects structures and collections housed within
        those structures.

One-Week Online Disaster Planning Seminar at
<URL:http://www.museumclasses.org>

Dip your toes into the online learning experience and see if it
works for you. Our one-week seminars are short, concise topics that
provide you with instructor feedback. Here is the first one we are
offering in 2008, a wonderful chance to self-analyze your disaster
preparedness.

MS002: Collection Protection - Are you Prepared? (short course)
Mar 3-7, 2008
Price: $75
Instructor: Terri Schindel
Location:
    <URL:http://museumclasses.org/training/trol_classes_ms002.html>

    Disaster planning is overwhelming. Where do you start? Talk to
    Terri about how to get going. Use her check list to determine
    your level of preparedness. What do you already have in place?
    Are you somewhat prepared? What can you do next? Participants in
    Collection Protection will read literature and complete a
    checklist before joining a one-hour chat to discuss disaster
    preparedness at their institutions. Each student should read
    course materials and prepare questions or comments to share with
    the other students in the chats. The final chat summarizes what
    was learned in the readings from the week.

    This seminar takes no more than 10 hours of time.

    Please sign up at <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org> and pay at
    <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org/tas/tas.html> . If you have
    trouble with either, please contact Helen Alten
    <helen<-a t->collectioncare< . >org>

MS108: Fundamentals of Museum Volunteer Programs (*New*)
Mar 3-Mar 28, 2008
Price: $425
Instructor: Karin Hostetter
Location: <URL:http://museumclasses.org/training/trol_classes_ms108.html>

    Volunteers are essential for most non-profit institutions. But
    even though they don't get paychecks, it takes time and money to
    have effective volunteers. Fundamentals of Museum Volunteer
    Programs, new for 2008, is designed to teach the basics of a
    strong volunteer program. Topics include recruiting, training,
    and rewarding volunteers, as well as preparing staff.
    Instruction continues through firing and liabilities.
    Participants will end up with custom forms tailored to their
    institutions, an understanding of liability issues and a
    nine-step process to troubleshoot an existing volunteer program
    or create the best one for a particular institution.

    Course Outline
    Week One

        Introduction
        Laying the Foundation: preparing staff, job descriptions
        Determining Program Structure: who's in charge

    Week Two

        Recruiting Volunteers
        Selecting Volunteers Week Three
        Training Volunteers
        Evaluating Volunteers
        Saying "Thank You"

    Week Four

        Keeping Records
        Communicating Information: including handling change
        Liability
        Conclusion

    Logistics: Participants in Fundamentals of Museum Volunteer
    Programs work at their own pace through sections and interact
    through online chats. Instructor Karin Hostetter is available at
    scheduled times during the course for email support.
    Fundamentals of Museum Volunteer Programs includes online
    literature and student-teacher/group-teacher dialog. The course
    is limited to 20 participants.

    Fundamentals of Museum Volunteer Programs runs four weeks. Sign
    up at <URL:http://www.museumclasses.org> and pay for the course
    at <URL:http://www.collectioncare.org/tas/tas.html>. If you have
    trouble completing an on-line order, please contact Helen Alten
    at helen<-a t->collectioncare< . >org or Eric Swanson at
    eric<-a t->collectioncare< . >org

    The Instructor:

        Karin Hostetter, author of a series of articles for the
        National Association for Interpretation's Legacy magazine,
        has worked with volunteers for nearly 15 years. She taught
        the National Association for Interpretation's two-day
        volunteer management course for volunteer coordinators and
        served on a panel about volunteer programs. As the first
        paid volunteer coordinator for the Denver Zoo in Colorado,
        she designed an interview process, developed a progressive
        and comprehensive recognition system, introduced
        interpretation into training, and restructured the volunteer
        organization. Ms. Hostetter now consults with organizations
        on structuring and improving volunteer programs. And she
        volunteers herself.


                                  ***
                  Conservation DistList Instance 21:44
                Distributed: Saturday, February 23, 2008
                       Message Id: cdl-21-44-011
                                  ***
Received on Friday, 22 February, 2008

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