The Abbey Newsletter

Volume 14, Number 5
Aug 1990


Literature

Conferences & Professional Publications

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"Paper Conservation Assists Accident Investigations," by David Tremain, was a paper given at the May 1990 meeting of the IIC-Canadian Group. Freeze-drying and use of Parylene to save damaged logbooks after airplane crashes are used by the Canadian Aviation Safety Board. They learned these techniques from paper conservators. David Tremain is at the CCI.

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The most complete report of the recent conference, "Book Arts in the U.S.A.," is in the January-March 1990 Bibliography Newsletter. It is l3 ½ pages long, and the author, Bryan Johnson (former editor of the Book Arts Review), says it was poorly organized. In an effort to cram as much as possible into two days, the organizers eliminated all opportunities for the audience to ask questions of panelists and discuss matters brought up by the speakers. He thought that one of the matters discussed, at least, should have been, "What are the book arts?"

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Almost the entire issue of the latest Neue Museums Kunde (2/90) is on conservation, and several English-language works are reviewed in the literature section. Museum conservators who read German may want to contact the editor for a copy. They just moved, and their new address is Brüderstrasse 10, Berlin, DDR-1020.

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Restaurator 11(2), 1990:

H. Bansa - Computerized leafcasting

I. Beöthy-Kozocsa, T. Sipos-Richter & G. Szlabey - Parchment codex restoration using parchment and cellulose fibre pulp

D. Jacobs & B. Rodgers - Developments in the conservation of Oriental (Islamic) manuscripts at the India Office Library, London

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"Image Formats for Preservation and Access: A Report of the Technology Assessment Advisory Committee to the Commission on Preservation and Access", by Michael Lesk. CPA, July 1990. 10 pp. Besides the introduction and conclusions, the sections are headed:

Turn the Pages Once

Preservation Alternatives

Storage Considerations

  1. Magnetic Disk
  2. Optical WORM
  3. Digital Video Tape
  4. Digital Audio Tape
  5. Conventional Magnetic Tape
  6. CD-ROM
  7. Magneto-Optical Erasable Disk
  8. Digital Paper

Conversion Considerations

Transmission Considerations

It is natural to compare this report with the National Research Council's 1986 volume, Preservation of Historical Records, which also was a report of an expert group that had been asked "Which format is best for preservation purposes?" The National Research Council's answer to the National Archives, which had commissioned the report, was that it was best to stick with paper and microfilm, both of which could be expected to last for a thousand years under optimal conditions and which did not require equipment for access that might become obsolete in five or ten years. This report does not refer to that one. It weighs the cost of initially generating the record and copying it yearly, for each book, assuming 10 books=1 gigabyte, and says that digital storage is an appropriate experiment today for the larger libraries, or for groups of libraries. For text storage, ASCII storage may be the best if the price comes down; digital image storage, which is in the sane price range as microfilm, is promising.

This report is not as carefully done as the earlier one, at least in the part where traditional image formats and preservation measures are discussed. It criticizes deacidification as a method not yet in a full production stage (but the same could be said about several of the digital storage methods), and for leaving the original item in its fragile state (but who would be silly enough to deacidify a fragile book?), and for "merely arresting deterioration for a while" (but it doesn't arrest--stop--it at all; its function is to slow down deterioration, which it does, for a long long while). Other remarks reveal a lack of familiarity with conservation techniques, appreciation of intrinsic value, and the quality of microfilm images for exacting research. All deacidified books are said to have an objectionable odor. So this report cannot be taken as a serious comparison of digital and nondigital methods of book preservation, though it may be a valuable comparison of the various digital information storage methods.

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"Evaluation of Cellulose Ethers for Conservation," by M. Wilt and R. Feller (No. 3 in the GCI series, "Research in Conservation) is available for $20 + $3.50 shipping & handling from the Getty Conservation Institute. Send order to the J. Paul Getty Book Distribution Center, PO Box 2112, Santa Monica, CA 90406; or call 213/459-7611.

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Issue No. 1 (Spring 1990) of the McKay Lodge Conservation Report came in July--illustrated, nicely laid out, and informative. It will be distributed free on request to museums, to corporate and private collection curators and managers as well as to other interested art professionals in its service area (address is 10915 Pyle-South Amherst Rd., Oberlin, OH 44074, which is not far from Cleveland). Its scope includes paintings and art an paper, the kind of work done in the McKay Lodge Fine Arts Conservation Laboratory, Inc., by Gina McKay and Robert Lodge, and their professional employees. Paper conservator Janet English joined them in April. She was formerly at the National Museum of American History, where she worked on large archival collections.

The lab's new quarters are shown in a series of photographs. The "Q & A" column this time is on "The Light Stability of Black and Ball-pen Inks." In general, it says, black inks made for artist or technical use are reasonably lightfast, while black writing inks are not.

The telephone number there is 216/774-4215, and the fax is 775-1368.

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Dirt and Pictures Separated consists of the papers given at a conference held jointly by the United Kingdom Institute for Conservation and the Tate Gallery, January 1990. 12 papers, 56 pp. $14 (members)/$18 (nonmembers) from UKIC, 37 Upper Addison Gardens, London W14 8AJ, postpaid. At least half of the papers summarize current knowledge on general problems or phenomena. Especially recommended are:

"The Deposition of Dirt: A Review of the Literature, with Scanning Electron Microscope Studies of Dirt on Selected Paintings," by Alan Phenix and Aviva Burnstock "Detergents, Soaps, Surfactants," by Anna Southall

but nearly the whole book is good for browsing, self-education and gathering of little-known facts to astound your friends with. Did you know that dirt (dust) is delivered through the air to the things that get dirty by a) diffusion, b) thermophoresis, c) diffusion in an electric field, and d) inertial impaction?

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Ink & Gall, a Marbling Journal IV(1), 1990, came in August, and features marblers in the British Isles, where the climate is favorable for marbling. There are 14 papers by and about these marblers, making an unusually fine issue.

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"Post-Symposium Report," July 1990, was published by the Association of Forensic Document Examiners from San Antonio, Texas, as a record of its May 3-7 meeting in San Antonio (All their meetings are invitational. People in related fields like paper conservation may be invited to become Affiliate Members, which presumably makes it possible for them to attend meetings. $75/year. Write to Sgt. John Gorajczyk, Membership Director, Du Page County Sheriff's Dept., 501 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL 60187.)

Papers given at the May meeting that may be of interest to book and paper conservators are:

J. G. Stroud and S. B. Murphy - Ink and Paper from the Conservator's Perspective

D. Sckwartze0ruber - Lee Tek Systems. (The Lee Tek infrared system was demonstrated. The unit offers straight IR, IR luminescence examination, and portability.)

J. S. Gorajczyk - Examination and Identification of Photocopies

D. Morehouse - Color Copier Identification

J. Grimer - Printing Ink Examinations and Comparisons

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Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild Newsletter 8(3), Autumn 1990:

Ronald Dunlop - The Book: 400-1500 AD (p. 3-10; reprinted from Morocco Bound)

Educational Opportunities in the Book Arts (p. 19-21;

includes entries from Mexico, Switzerland and the UK, as well as Canada and the U.S.)

Rudi Diesvelt - The Cockerell Bindery Sale (P. 30-32; the most detailed report yet)

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C.H. Roberts and T. C. Skeat. The Birth of the Codex. Oxford: Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1989. 88 pp. f-8.95. A reprint of the edition of 1983.

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Conference papers from the Joint Technical Symposium, "Archiving the Audio-Visual Heritage" (May 3-5, 1990, Ottawa Hall) will be made available free to attendees and for $40 Canadian to others when they are ready. Write to Frederick Granger, Canadian Museum of Civilization, 100 Laurier St., Hull, Quebec, Box 3100, Station B, J8X 4H2.

Standards & Practical Guides

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The National Preservation Office in the British Library has published three new free booklets, on Mould, Boxing and Encapsulation. All are sponsored by Riley Dunn & Wilson, Conservators and Bookbinders. The one on mold does not recommend fumigation, but does recommend an RH of 50-557, which may be as low as they can get it in Britain. The one an boxes gives specifications for boxboard that even include lightfastness ("Blue wool scale reading of 5"), a 3% level of calcium carbonate, freedom from optical brightening agents and a maximum of 0.8 parts per million of reducible sulfur. The one on encapsulation covers all the main points but makes very mild comments about the need to deacidify first if the paper is acid, or to add a sheet of alkaline paper behind the document; in the absence of natural aging experiments on encapsulated material, though, mild comments are probably justified. The booklets' format is attractive and they are on alkaline paper. For details contact the National Preservation Office, British Library, Great Russell St., London WC1B 3DG.

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Managing Archives and Archival Institutions, edited by James G. Bradsher. University of Chicago Press, 1989 (?). One of the chapters, by Norvell M.M. Jones and Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler, is essentially a condensed manual of preservation. The book is also distributed by the Society of American Archivists, which charges $40 for SAA members and $45 for nonmembers.

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"I 'Ferri' Impressi sulle Coperte delle Legature. Proposta di Codification," by Carlo Federici, Kostantinos Houlis, and Piccarda Quilici. Bollettino dell'Istituto Centrale per la Patologia del Libro XL, 1986, P. 41-124. The author's summary says, "The decoration of the leather covers of ancient books has been carried out mostly by using metal punchers [decorative tools] of different shapes and functions. The resultant blind stamping has taken in Italian, by extension, the name of 'ferro.' In this paper the authors have outlined a system of codification of such blind Stampings which, by means of an alphanumeric expression, extremely short (11 characters), allows a synthetic description of each blind stamping. The use of this code--besides simplifying the identification of each blind stamping--will help to create homogeneous sets of comparable blind stampings, thus making it easier to place them in their proper historical (geochronological) context." The classification scheme is obscure, despite the wealth of illustrations. The difficulty is not in the language, but in the fact that subdivisions of a category are identified with the same type of symbol as the main category, e.g.,

A Human and mythological figures

A Generic figures

A Knights

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Scheda di Censimento delle Legature Medievali: Protocollo di Descrizione. Istituto Centrale per la Patologia del Libro, Ram, 1989? (Received Jan. 1990) 134 pp. This work was apparently done by the Institute's Gruppo di Lavoro sulla Legatura Medievale (Working Group on Medieval Bindings), coordinated by Carlo Federici. Every conceivable way in which one medieval bookbinding can differ from another seems to have been identified and pictured in drawings, to facilitate the ongoing census of medieval bindings in Italy. All in Italian, but the vocabulary is small and the diagrams help a lot. The Institute's address is: via Milano 76, 00184 Rome, Italy. The copy that cane to the Newsletter office was sent by Enidata S.p.A., Uffici di Roma, Via Elio Chianesi, 110-00128 Rome, Italy. It was accompanied by a blank 81-page documentation form entitled "Bordereau."

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Technical Considerations in Choosing Mass Deacidification Processes, by Peter G. Sparks. Report. Washington, DC: Commission on Preservation and Access, May 1990. 22 pp. This report comes not a moment too soon: libraries in this country and Europe have been hiring consultants, wondering and changing their minds over which deacidification method to go with. Everyone has felt the need for an independent evaluation of existing methods, and this is a big step in that direction. The author served as Director for Preservation at the Library of Congress for eight years before beginning a consulting business in 1989. This report is available for $5.00 from the Commission on Preservation &O Access, 1785 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Suite 313, Washington, DC 20036.

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Preservation and Conservation in the Small Library, by Marcia Duncan Lowry. Chicago: Library Administration and Management Association, American Library Association, 1989. 16 pp. $5.00.

The author did not know enough to write a manual, even a short manual like this, on preservation and conservation in a small library, and the publisher should have known better than to publish something like this without Subjecting it to peer review. There is a place for local publications like Keeping Your Past by the Kansas City Area Archivists (reviewed on p. 35, in the April issue), but a national publication like this, with the weight of the ALA behind it, should be of higher quality. There is already enough good material in print. Why not take something like the RLG Preservation Manual and make it simpler and briefer?

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The Care and Preservation of Philatelic Materials, by T.J. Collings and R.F. Schoolley-West, was announced in the April issue as being available for $12.95 from the American Philatelic Society.- Either that was mistake, or the price has gone up, because it is now announced as available for $20 postpaid, to nonmembers ($16 members). It is also sold by Leonard Hartmann, PO Box 36006, Louisville, KY 40233.

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The Artist's Complete Health and Safety Guide, by Monona Rossol. Allworth Press, 10 East 23rd St., New York, NY 10010. $16.95 + $2.50 for shipping and handling. A resource guide for people working with dyes, pigments, inks, plastics, leather, wood, photographic chemicals or metals, which includes a lot of conservators.

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Waste Disposal in Academic Institutions, edited by James A. Kaufman. Boca Raton: Lewis Publishers, 1990. 200 pp, ISBN 0-87371-256-0. Catalog No. L256LABJ. $55.

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"Combatting Household Pests Without Chemical Warfare," by Robert Kourik. Garbage, March/April 1990, p. 22-29. Many household pests are also pests in institutions, and can be controlled equally well in both places by integrated pest management. Garbage, The Practical Journal for the Environment, is published by the old-House Journal Corp., 435 Ninth St., Brooklyn, NY 11215 (718/788-1700). $21/year.

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Bookbinding with Adhesives, by Tony Clark. McGraw-Hill Book Go., Ltd., Shoppenhangers Rd., Maidenhead, Berkshire, England SL6 2QL. 79 pp. $16.50 plus $2.64 for shipping. For edition bindery managers and operators; covers animal glues, starches and dextrines, emulsion adhesives and hot melt adhesives.

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Toby Murray's Basic Guidelines for Disaster Planning in Oklahoma & her Bibliography on Disasters, Disaster Preparedness, and Disaster Recovery have both been revised. The bibliography is now 59 pages long. Both publications are free upon receipt of a stamped ($1.85), self-addressed 9" x 12" envelope from Gary Harrington, Oklahoma Dept. of Libraries, 200 North East 18th, Oklahoma City, OK 73105.

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Hope for the Future: A Report on the Preservation of South Carolina s Paper-Based Records. Columbia, SC: Palmetto Archives, Libraries and Museums Council on Preservation, 1989. A consultants' report, published with support from NEH and SOLINET. 35 pp. Page 13-29 carries findings and recommendations on general preservation guidelines, the building and the environment, disaster planning, storage and handling, reformatting and treatments. No price or address for ordering is given, so it must not be meant for general distribution.

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A Guide to Standards, by Albert L. Batik. Published by the author, Parker, 00, 1989; available for $12 from ASTM, 1916 Race St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 (215/299-5585); $10 to ASTM members. 129 pages, soft cover. As the author confesses, this book is not all-encompassing; in fact, its coverage is spotty. Its main emphasis is promotion of the use of standards. It is not well written, there are not enough subheadings to help the reader find specific sections already read, and there is no index. Still, the author seem to have a lot of experience with standards, and is able to explain some of the puzzling aspects of their use pretty well. Page 77 to 128 consists of an annotated directory of organizations involved in one way or another with voluntary consensus standards.

Bibliographies & Other Lists

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Research Abstracts of the Scientific Program, Compiled by James R. Druzik. Getty Conservation Institute, 4503 Glencoe Ave., Marina del Rey, CA 90292. June 1989. 180 pp. Research projects are listed with personnel, location (some of the work is done at other institutions, by non-GCI personnel), period of activity, project abstract, major findings and recommendations, and primary publications resulting from the work. Some of the projects are relevant to book and paper conservation and to preservation administration. They concern energy conservation, experimental design, parylene C and -N, chemiluminescence, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. The one on energy conservation and climate control in museums found, surprisingly, that the savings from varying temperature with the seasons were very small (1-3%), while use of heat recovery chillers could save 88-99% of the heating and humidification costs. There is also a project at CCI on the Potential Adverse Effects of Pest Control Agents on the Materials of Museum Artifacts (including paper).

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Art & Architecture Thesaurus. Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016. 3 vols. Acid-free paper. ISBN 0-19-506403-8. $250. Modelled after the National Library of Medicine's MESH thesaurus, and prepared by ANSI and BSI standards. 47,000 terms.

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"Glossary of Selected Preservation Terms," developed by the Library/Vendors Task Force of the ALA Preservation of Library Materials Section. A draft, published to solicit feedback, in ALCTS Newsletter 1(2), 1990, p. 14-15.

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Training in Conservation: A Guide to Full-Time Courses in the United Kingdom. 2 from the Conservation Unit, Museums and Galleries Commission, 7 St. Jams Square, London SW1Y 4JU, England.

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Insecticides of Plant Origin. J.T. Arnason, B.J.R. Philogene, and P. Morand, Editors. (ACS Symposium Series No. 387). American Chemical Society, 1989. 224 pp. ISBN 08412-1569-3. $44.95, clothbound. Call ACS, 202/872-8065.

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Bibliography: Theses, Dissertations, Research Reports in Conservation, A Preliminary Report, by Gabriela Krist et al. Budapest: ICOM Committee for Conservation, 1987. 188 pp. Includes grey literature (internal textbooks or teaching aids, museum and exhibition catalogs, booklets, reports, bibliographies and other material not officially published). Arranged by date under country. The number of entries relevant to book and paper conservation averages one per page, though of course they are in all languages. Addresses are given for ordering most of the items, though availability must vary, since they date from 1975 or so to 1985 or so. Write to National Centre of Museums, PO Box 54, H-1476 Budapest 1000, Hungary, for the bibliography.

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Back volumes of the Paper Conservator are offered at 7.50 to nonmembers of IPC; combined volume 5/6, the Health and Safety Manual, is 6.00 to members, no price given for nonmembers; all other volumes are 13.50 to nonmembers. Order from Clare Hampson, IPC, Leigh Lodge, Leigh, Worcester, WR6 5LB, England.

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A selected bibliography on curator/conservator relations, 1970-1990, is available from the compiler, Charlotte B. Brown, Shadek-Fackenthal Library, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003. It is updated before each ALA meeting, as an activity of the RBMS Discussion Group an Curatorial Issues Raised by Conservation.

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Art Hazards News 13(4), 1990, is a Special Resource Issue containing 10 lists of organizations and publications: occupational health clinics, regional poison control centers, safety supply sources, offices of NIOSH and OSHA, committees on occupational safety and health, and a pageful of publications of the Center for Safety in the Arts (5 Beekman St., Suite 1030, New York, NY 10038 212/227-6220). One-year subscriptions are $18.50.

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Bibliography: Theses, Dissertations, Research Reports in Conservation: A Preliminary Report, by Gabriela Krist et al. Budapest 1987. (Copyright held by the five authors. The work was initiated by the Working Group on Training in Restoration and Conservation of ICOM.) Order from National Centre of Museums, PO Box .54, H-1476 Budapest 1000, Hungary. 188 pp. The average page lists one or so item relevant to book or paper conservation. The addresses of the institutions at which the work was done or the reports published are given at the beginning of each section. References are listed by year under each institution. It would be nice to have an indexed list of just those references that relate to book and paper conservation.

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Antiquariaat Prits, a rare and used book dealer in The Netherlands, issued its Catalogue 165 a few months ago, all on the subject of paper. In fact, the second part of this catalog lists decorated papers of various sorts, and pictures many of them in color. The first part is "an important collection of books on papermaking, paper-history, paper-art and marbling, for the greater part from the library of Fred Siegenthaler." Among the books listed are nine by or about Dard Hunter, Sukey Hughes' Washi, Moritz Illig's 1807 publication (in a 1959 reprint "Anleitung, auf eine sichere, einfache und wohlfeile Art Papier in der Masse zu leimen, " Rosamond Loring's Decorated Book Papers Gray Parrot's Some Marbled Papers. Most prices seem reasonable, though the Parrot book is listed at 3400 guilders (about $1700). Over 700 item in all. Write Antiquariaat Frits Knuf, PO Box 720, 4116 ZJ Buren, the Netherlands (tel. [0] 3447-1691, Fax 03449-2617).

Nonbook Materials

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Videotape, "Paperworks: Stabilizing Archival Collections." Item #423Vr. VHS format. Approx. 25 min. $76/$68.40 to AASLH members. AASLH Order Dept., 172 Second Ave. North, Nashville, TN 37201 (615/255-2971). A technician or possibly an archivist is shown unpacking boxes of material received, deciding what to keep and what to throw away, and preparing the material for accessioning or storage by dry cleaning the paper surface, humidifying, removing paper clips, sorting out nitrate film, duplicating fragile item , and preparing finding aids. Freeze drying is recommended to kill insects and microorganisms (except mold); viewers are advised to throw out leather books with red rot, because there is no way to treat or prevent red rot, and rebinding is not mentioned; old handwritten journals, even when very deteriorated, are to be kept because they are fascinating; scrapbooks can be preserved as an entity, dismantled, or reconstructed on new pages, and/or photographed. Sound storage conditions and materials are recommended, and the viewer is strongly advised to read, contact colleagues, attend workshops and seminars, and call on SAA and other conservation organizations for further assistance.

There were a few rough edges in the part dealing with conservation and preservation, but the video should be useful and instructive overall formal collections that have no other guide--except for the cavalier way in which the important derision of what to keep and what to throw out is handled. It also seem that formal accessioning should come in there somewhere between brushing off the dust and preparing finding aids. This is important for preservation, because preservation has to be based on good administrative practices.

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Videotape, "Library Binding: A Shared Responsibility, a Collaborative Effort." 1989. 26 minutes. $25 + $4.50 P&H. Order from Library of Congress Sales office, Washington, DC 20540. Also available in 16 m film format from the Library Binding Institute or the National Preservation Program office. Baker & Taylor also sells the video through its Video Marketplace. For B&T address see your local librarian.

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Videotape, "Shedding Light on the Case," covers techniques of exhibition installation. Produced by the Preservation Division of the Columbia University Libraries as a sequel to "Murder in the Stacks" (1987), which dealt with handling of books. Both are available for $35 each prepaid, including P&H, from Gifts & Exchange, Columbia University Libraries, 535 W. 114th St., Room 104, New York, NY 10027. "Shedding Light" comes with a pamphlet and is 15 minutes long.

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Videotape, "Library Binding, a Collaborative Process, a Shared Responsibility," published by the National Program Office of the Library of Congress. 26 min., color, VHS, $25 from the Library of Congress Sales Shop, Washington, DC 20540. Add $4.50 for shipping and handling. Funding was provided by the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Frank M. Barnard Foundation, Library Binding Institute and several businesses in the industry. The videotape provides a demonstration of what a "modern commercial bindery does when a shipment of library materials to be bound is received, and stresses the responsibilities of both the bindery and the library in producing the best results. (Incidentally, this approach, rather than the passive or antagonistic approaches, is what the quality gurus in business management have advocated for decades, both in Japan and the U.S. It has been adopted in Japan and parts of the U.S. There was a recent article in the Smithsonian for August on one of these gurus, Ed Deming.

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A video tour of the exhibits in the Dard Hunter Paper Museum as it looked before it was packed for the move to Atlanta in 1989, with commentary by Arnold Grummer, one-time curator, is available for rent ($5) or purchase ($20 including postage). The museum is packed away until the fall of 1991, when it will be installed in new climate-controlled quarters, near the paper conservation lab in the new quarters of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology. Some of the items in the museum have been lent to exhibitions celebrating the 300th anniversary of papermaking in America. For information, contact Cathy Baker, 77 Admiral Rd., Buffalo, NY 14216 (716/838-4686).

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For copies of the videotape described in the last issue, "Turning to Dust" (p. 76), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is referring U.S. customers to Filmmakers Library, 124 E. 40th St., New York, NY 10016 (212/808-4980). They charge $65 to rent and $395 to buy, but small libraries with limited budgets or individuals can apply for discounts.

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A videotape detailing traditional papermaking in China was filmed at two locations of Xuan Paper, one in Jing Xian in Anhui Province and one in Jiajiang in Sichuan Province. $40 plus postage from Ma Shi Hui, No. 1 Xian Ge Yuan, Dong Zhi Men Wai, Beijing, China.

For the Public

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The Adventures of the Incredible Librarian sampler issue has appeared, according to the June 1 Library Journal. This is a comic book with a bilingual heroine who fights the good fight for preservation and freedom of information. Subscriptions are $28.80 in the US, $32.80 in Canada and Mexico, from Preservation Graphics, Inc., Box 25544 Library Lane, Tempe, AZ 85285; Fax 602/921-2709.

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"Going! Going!! Gone!!!" by Bob Schwalberg with Henry Wilhelm and Carol Brower. Popular Photography, June 1990, p. 37-49, 60. Valuable summary of the problem of permanence of color film, with results of research trials, names and test results of brand name film, plenty of illustrations, advice for keeping what you've already got, and a page on Henry Wilhelm himself. Wilhelm's book, with contributing author Carl Brower, The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs: Prints, Negative, Slides, and Motion Pictures, will be published this summer (it says) by Preservation Publishing Go., PO Box 567, Grinnell, IA 50112. This is the book that bas been widely anticipated for years.

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