The Alkaline Paper Advocate

Volume 3, Number 1
Mar 1990


Literature

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"World Roundup 2000: Developments in Printing and Writing and Newsprint Papers in Europe," by W.R. Williams. In The Pulp and Paper Industry: 2000 and Beyond, a supplement of the February, 1990 Tappi Journal and Pulp and Paper Journal. P. 55-57. In the section an mineral s, the author says titanium dioxide is used much more in North America than in Europe, because Americans demand higher opacity, but the Europeans have not been using precipitated calcium carbonate to get brightness either. For brightness they use optical brighteners and natural calcium carbonate. Europe has good sources of bright chalk, limestone and marble for this. At least 90%. of coated freesheet is neutral (which may also mean alkaline, in the author's usage, if it is the same as American usage), and 75% of uncoated freesheet.

In the manufacture of mechanical (groundwood) papers, calcium carbonate is not used because neutral operations are more complex and expensive. It is used, however, in some coatings, apparently as the outer coat in double-coated paper,,.

The author says that if a commodity-grade printing and writing mill ever decides to install a satellite PCC plant, it seems likely that other mills will be forced to follow, especially since the use of KC brightens paper by up to 5 points at a specific opacity, enabling the mill to use less highly bleached pulp. (The pulping process in kraft mills has been identified as the source of dioxins in paper and mill effluent.)

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'"Book Preservation Pressures Speed up Conversion of Acid Paper to Alkaline," by Ellen McCrady. Pulp & Paper, January 1990, p. 122-124. As Editor of this Newsletter, and author of this article, I would like to disclaim responsibility for the title, which I would not have chosen. I believe that most people in the paper industry would agree that conversion to alkaline papermaking has been spurred by economic and environmental factors and, more recently, by competitive forces. Otherwise, the material in the article should be familiar to readers of the Alkaline Paper Advocate.

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"Neutral Sizing System Allows Fast, Easy Conversion for Acid Machines," by Brian Herner. Pulp & Paper, Jan. 1990, p. 141-145. The author compares and explains sizing system that operate at different pH levels. The sizing system that is responsible for brittle books is the alum/rosin soap size, which operates (he says) at pH 4.2 to 4.5. Alum/ dispersed resin operates at 4.8 to 6.0 and is too acid to use with carbonate. But polyaluminum hydroxy chloride/ dispersed resin works at pH 6.0 to 7.5, and so is compatible with calcium carbonate fillers. This is an advantage where recycled fiber from carbonate-coated papers is used, but the mill is not willing or able to use synthetic size.

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"Permanent Paper: The Freedom to Choose," by Martin Koepenick. PIMA, Jan. 1990, p. 21-24. Preceded by a disclaimer dissociating the article from the consensus opinion of the advisory board of PIMA. Discusses the history of paper permanence and presents the opinions of several paper industry spokesmen m the topic of permanence. Urges the paper industry to take the lead in the permanence issue and set standards for quality, performance and the environment. The author is a partner in Innova International, an Atlanta company that provides public affairs counsel on global market issues.

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A videotape detailing traditional papermaking in China was filmed at two locations of Xuan Paper, one in Jing Xian in Anhui Province and one in Jiajiang in Sichuan Province. $40 plus postage from Ma Shi Hui, No. 1 Xian Ge Yuan, Dong Zhi Men Wai, Beijing, China.

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International Paper's Ticonderoga mill has just completed an educational video on the papermaking process from woodlands to the reprographic machine. Its objective is to introduce the general public, especially young people, to the manufacture of fine white paper. It also gives the history of the relationship between a small, northern New York town and its leading employer.

This video is part of an educational package being made available to schools, colleges, and community groups throughout northern New York and Vermont. Any individual, organization or educational institution interested in receiving a copy of the 16-minute video may contact the producer, David Schaefer & Co., Chace Mill East, One Mill St., Burlington, VT (802/864-3131).

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URL: http://cool.conservation-us.org/byorg/abbey/ap/ap03/ap03-1/ap03-115.html
Timestamp: Sunday, 03-Mar-2013 21:41:29 PST
Retrieved: Saturday, 25-Nov-2017 07:36:52 GMT