JAIC 1985, Volume 24, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 92 to 103)
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Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1985, Volume 24, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 92 to 103)

PAINTINGS ON A PHOTOGRAPHIC BASE

Mervyn Ruggles



4 THE CARTE-DE-VISTE

IN 1854, ANDRÉ DISDÉRI (1819–90),10 who had a studio at 8 Boulevard des Italiens in Paris, patented the technique of producing the carte-de-viste photograph. Disdéri had the idea of replacing the ordinary business card with a miniature portrait. His conception of these 3½″ × 2¼″ photographs became extremely popular everywhere. Cartes-de-viste were produced with portraits of royalty, notable people, views of well known places. Also, miniature portraits were made on white card or heavy paper for sale to miniature artists who then painted over them to resemble miniatures on ivory (Figs. 1, 2). Subsequently Disdéri was appointed court photographer by Napoleon III in 1861.

Fig. 1. Miniature painting on carte-de-visite taken in Paris, 1862, by André Disdéri, painted in Quebec City by William Lockwood (1803–1866). (Photograph courtesy of the Public Archives of Canada, Ottawa.)

Fig. 2. Back of miniature painting, Fig. 1 showing coats-of-arms and inscription “André Disdéri, Photographe de S.M. l'Empereur, 8 boulevard des Italiens, Paris.” (Photograph courtesy of the Public Archives of Canada, Ottawa.)


Copyright © 1985 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works