JAIC 1991, Volume 30, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 163 to 177)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1991, Volume 30, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 163 to 177)

SOME IMPROVEMENTS IN THE STUDY OF CROSS SECTIONS

JIA-SUN TSANG, & ROLAND H. CUNNINGHAM


ABSTRACT—This paper outlines techniques developed at the Conservation Analytical Laboratory, Smithsonian Institution, for the preparation of thick cross sections (50 microns and up) and microtomed cross sections (10 microns and up) of small samples from works of art. The sectioning methods discussed here enable us to maximize the information that can be retrieved from samples of paint films. One advantage of the 10-micron microtomed sections is that they are thin enough to be analyzed non-destructively using transmission Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). These results can be used as the first material classification step in our analytical materials identification scheme. We can then proceed using destructive chemical and physical tests of thin-sections with greater confidence. The identification of the binding media and pigments from several cross sections is also described.

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. PREPARATION OF SAMPLES FOR CROSS SECTIONING
3. METHODS THAT CAN BE APPLIED TO THE STUDY OF THICK AND MICROTOMED CROSS SECTIONS
4. APPLICATIONS OF THE METHOD
5. CONSERVATION TREATMENT OF THOMAS DEWING, AMERICA RECEIVING NINE MUSES
6. DISCUSSION
7. CONCLUSIONS
a: Notes , Materials , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1991 American Institute of Historic and Artistic Works