JAIC 1992, Volume 31, Number 2, Article 6 (pp. 225 to 236)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1992, Volume 31, Number 2, Article 6 (pp. 225 to 236)

FURNITURE FINISH LAYER IDENTIFICATION BY INFRARED LINEAR MAPPING MICROSPECTROSCOPY

MICHELE R. DERRICK, DUSAN C. STULIK, JAMES M. LANDRY, & STEVEN P. BOUFFARD


ABSTRACT—Infrared linear mapping microspectroscopy is a new technique that can provide information about the composition, position, and size of individual layers in a multilayered sample. Resin coating samples from multilayered facsimiles as well as cross sections of finishes taken from historical furniture were microtomed with and without the use of embedding media. A linear mapping routine was then used to systematically collect infrared spectra from each microtomed sample by sequentially moving the sample in 20 μm steps under an aperture of 20 400 μm. The resulting spectra were used for identification of components in individual layers on the samples. The advantages and limitations of the analysis technique are discussed using finish samples taken from 16th-, 18th-, and 19th-century furniture.

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. EXPERIMENTAL
3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
4. CONCLUSION
a: Notes , Materials , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1992 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works