JAIC 1994, Volume 33, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 101 to 114)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1994, Volume 33, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 101 to 114)

POLARIZED LIGHT MICROSCOPY IN CONSERVATION: A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE

WALTER C. McCRONE


ABSTRACT—A conservator in any area of art or archaeology should know what materials he or she is dealing with. The microscopist quickly identifies metals, minerals, ceramics, vegetable and wood fibers, animal hairs (species), textile fibers, corrosion products, pigments, media, supports, dyes, inks, etc. Although many other useful microanalytical techniques are available, the only instrument capable of such complete characterization and identification for such a variety of diverse substances is the polarized light microscope.

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. USES OF MICROSCOPY
3. INSTRUMENTATION
4. TECHNIQUES
5. APPLICATIONS
6. CONCLUSIONS
a: Notes , Materials , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1994 American Institute of Historic and Artistic Works