JAIC 1994, Volume 33, Number 2, Article 9 (pp. 185 to 191)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1994, Volume 33, Number 2, Article 9 (pp. 185 to 191)

CRITERIA FOR TREATMENT OF COLLECTIONS HOUSED IN HISTORIC STRUCTURES

BARBARA APPELBAUM


ABSTRACT—The author discusses criteria used, although not often made explicit, for the treatment of collections exhibited in art museums: an intensive treatment model, most common in paintings collections, and a collections management model, more common in larger collections of objects with lower individual values. Neither model is entirely appropriate for collections shown in period settings. Historic structures and period settings expose collections to more hazards while providing much less physical protection; therefore, treatments should be maximally protective. The aesthetic goals in these settings may not be as clear as those in art museums, because objects are presented as though in use. They are neither totally neglected nor cleaned up to look as much as possible as they did when they were made. The creation of historic settings that are as accurate as possible while respecting the actual state of each object in the setting involves conflicting interests and is inevitably complex. The issues involved require substantive discussions among all parties.

Article Sections:

1. TWO ART MUSEUM MODELS
2. OBJECTS IN HISTORIC HOUSES: SOME PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES
3. THE CHALLENGES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL
4. SPECIAL TECHNIQUES FOR OBJECTS IN HISTORIC HOUSES
5. CONCLUSIONS
a: Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1994 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works