Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books
A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology

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wet-salting

A method of curing hides and skins for storage and/or transportation subsequent to flaying. The hide is spread out, flesh side up, and well sprinkled with salt (sodium chloride). Coarse, or round salt is preferred to fine salt, as the former spreads evenly, while the latter tends to form patchy. wet cakes. A second hide is laid over the first and sprinkled with salt, a process which is repeated until a stack 5 to 8 feet high is formed, the top hide being well overlaid with salt. The pack is left for approximately 30 days, during which time the salt dissolves in the moisture of the hides and the brine thus created permeates throughout the pile. The amount of salt used is generally 1 pound of salt for each pound of hide. When the hides are ready for shipment. they are "taken up," the salt is knocked off and the hides are then bundled and tied. Also called "green salting. See also: BRINING ;DRYING (1) ;DRY-SALTING , (248 , 306 , 363 )




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