JAIC 1979, Volume 19, Number 1, Article 3 (pp. 14 to 23)
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Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1979, Volume 19, Number 1, Article 3 (pp. 14 to 23)

IDENTIFICATION OF DYES ON OLD TEXTILES

Helmut Schweppe



APPENDIX


1 APPENDIX 1: SUPPLIERS OF NATURAL DYES/DRUGS

Paul Müggenburg, Drogen and Vegetabilien, Einfuhr- und Ausfuhrhandel, Wandalenweg 24, 2 Hamburg 1, West Germany

Petereit & Co., Medizinaldrogen, Import-Export, Groβhandlung Flamweg 132/134, Postfach 852, 22 Elmshorn bei Hamburg, West Germany

Hellmuth Carroux, Import-Export, Drogen-Talkum-Schwefel-Gummiharze-Schellack-Kernmehle, Neuer Wall 37, 2 Hamburg 36, West Germany

C. E. Roeper, Fach-Importeur, Drogen-Harze-Quellstoffe, Klosterallee 74, 2 Hamburg 13, West Germany

Etablissements A. Longeval S.A., Herboristerie en gros-Drogues-Produits chimiques-Essences-Gommes, Grand'Rue, 48, B-7870 Deux-Acren, Belgium

Compagnie Française des Extraits Maison Westphalen, B.P. 1375, 20, Rue de Pressence, 76 Le Havre, France


2 APPENDIX 2: BOOKS ON COLORING WITH NATURAL DYES

Natural Dyes and Home Dyeing (formerly titled: Natural Dyes in the United States). A practical guide with over 150 recipes. By Rita J. Adrosko. Dover Publications, Inc., 180 Varick Street, New York, N.Y. 10014, (1971).

Natural Dyes. By Sallie Pease Kierstead. Boston Branden Press Publishers (1972).

Dyes from Plants. By Seonaid M. Robertson. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York-Cincinnati-Toronto-London-Melbourne (1973).

Wir färben mit Pflanzen. Tagebuch eines Färbelehrganges mit Beiträgen von Irmgard Becker-Kutscher. Von Kurt Hentschel. WEBE MIT-Verlag, D-7065 Winterbach-Manolzweiler, West Germany (1977).

Färbbuch. Grundlagen der Pflanzenfärberei auf Wolle. Von Emil Spränger. Eugen Rentsch Verlag, Erlenbach-Zürich, Switzerland (1969).

Farben aus der Natur. Eine Sammlung alter und neuer Farbrezepte für das Färben auf Wolle, Seide, Baumwolle und Leinen. Von Gretel Fieler. Verlag M. & H. Schaper, 3 Hannover, West Germany (1978).


NOTES

1. The 20% ammonia solution can be replaced by 25% ammonia solution (d = 0.91), which is the solution usually supplied commercially.

2. Dissolve tannic acid (0.6 g) in water (100 ml), heat the solution to 60–70°C, and immerse cotton yarn (10 g) in the hot solution. Set aside the whole for 2 hours until it is cool, then remove the cotton, squeeze it free of liquid, immerse it in a cold solution of tarter emetic (prepared by dissolving 0.3 g antimony potassium tartrate in 100 ml water) for 20–30 minutes, and finally rinse it thoroughly with water. After the yarn has dried in air small portions of it can be used for dying tests.


Copyright © 1979 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works