JAIC 1980, Volume 19, Number 2, Article 5 (pp. 96 to 102)
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Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1980, Volume 19, Number 2, Article 5 (pp. 96 to 102)

SPRAYED POLY (VINYL ACETATE) HEAT SEAL ADHESIVE LINING OF PEN AND IRON GALL INK DRAWINGS ON TRACING PAPER

Thea Jirat-Wasiutynski



NOTES

1. Theodore E. Stebbins, Jr., “The Drawings of Washington Allston,” A Man of Genius: The Art of Washington Allston (1779–1843), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1979, p. 239.

2. Christine Steinkellner, “Transparentpapier, I,” Maltechnik/Restauro, 1, 1979, p. 9.

3. Compare Stebbins, Ibid., p. 240, who is wary of attributing all tracings to Allston.

4. Jared B. Flagg, The Life and Letters of Washington Allston, New York, Charles Scribners's Sons, 1892, opposite 132.

5. Stebbins, Ibid., p. 239.

6. P. Himmelstein and B. Applebaum, “The Use of Sprayed Polyvinyl Acetate Resin Mixtures in the Mounting of Deteriorated Textiles,” AIC Preprints of the annual meeting at Dearborn, Michigan, 1976, pp. 57–65.

7. B. Rabin, “A Poly (vinyl acetate) Heat-Seal Adhesive for Lining,” International Institute for Conservation, Lisbon Congress, 1972, p. 631.

8. G. Berger, “On Hot Melt, Heat-Seal and Hot-Set Adhesives,” Journal of the American Institute for Conservation, 18, 1978, p. 44.

9. Cerex Spunbonded Nylon, 0.4g/yd.2, obtained from Conservation Materials, Ltd. 340 Freeport Blvd., Sparks, NV 89431.

10. Himmelstein and Applebaum, Ibid., p. 63.

11. 1:60, methyl cellulose and deionized water. Methyl cellulose obtained from Sierra Conservation Supplies, P.O. Box 339, Nevada City, CA 95959.

12. Mechanical removal, while theoretically possible, should not be attempted on very fragile objects because of the danger of damaging the support and in this case the medium.


Copyright 1980 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works