JAIC 1981, Volume 20, Number 2, Article 8 (pp. 100 to 110)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1981, Volume 20, Number 2, Article 8 (pp. 100 to 110)

WALLPAPER CONSERVATION AT THE LONGFELLOW NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE: PARLOR AND DINING ROOM

Elizabeth Kaiser Schulte




REFERENCES

The water soluble adhesive used to attach the upper paper to the lower also had impregnated the pigment layer of the lower causing it to transfer to the back of the upper paper.

“Acryl 60” masonry binder can be obtained from Standard Dry Wall, Bristol, Pa. It is a co-polymer emulsion based on butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate. It also contains a few other additives such as an anti-foaming ingredient.

This step was done by the Restoration Carpenters at the Longfellow National Historic Site.

Various proprietary wallpaper adhesives were tested and proved satisfactory: Metylan Wallpaper Paste, Golden Harvest Non-staining Paste, Glutoline Wallpaper Paste, Rex, Sears Wallpaper Paste and Golden Harvest Vinyl Adhesive. Each adhesive was brushed on a piece of modern wallpaper and then artificially aged in an oven at 100 c. for 72 hours. Each sample was then tested after aging for folding endurance, paste solubility and general appearance. The folding endurance and appearance were similar for all the samples. The methyl cellulose samples showed greater solubility than the wheat starch paste after aging.

Obtain through a medical supply house.

Initially an 8:1 mixture of hexane/dimethyl formamide was used for cleaning. This mixture was used because our solvent tests had shown that acetone had a slight effect on the gold design when in prolonged contact with it. We found, however, by altering technique that acetone could be used safely and effectively. When we were assisted with the cleaning by members of the curatorial staff, we felt it necessary to use acetone for safety reasons even though precautionary measures had been taken when using the aforementioned solvents.

This paper was reproduced by the Birge Company, 310 Niagara Street, Buffalo, New York 14202.


Copyright 1981 American Institute of Historic and Artistic Works