JAIC 1981, Volume 20, Number 2, Article 10 (pp. 116 to 125)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1981, Volume 20, Number 2, Article 10 (pp. 116 to 125)

THE REMOVAL AND CONSERVATION TREATMENT OF A SCENIC WALLPAPER, PAYSAGE À CHASSES, FROM THE MARTIN VAN BUREN NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

Patricia Hamm, & James Hamm



2 DESCRIPTION OF THE WALLPAPER

THEPaysage à Chasses scenic wallpaper, printed by Jean Zuber in the 1830's in what is now Alsace-Lorraine, was hung during the redecoration period (1839–41) in the dining hall of “Lindenwald.” It was printed from approximately 1250 woodblocks in 142 colors, and takes its place among the fine scenic wallpapers which were produced in France at that time.1 This example of wallpaper reflects one of the remarkable technical achievements for which the Zuber factory was noted, namely the color-blended effect known as ombré or irisé.2

The 32 panels necessary to complete the four hunting scenes are repeated 1½ times, giving 45 panels on the north and south walls (each panel measuring eight feet long and 18½ inches wide). The paper support for the scenics is an early example of the wove, continuous roll type of paper. The decorative dado, printed by Jacquemart and Bernard,3 which was placed below the scenics on the wall was printed on sheets approximately 17″ × 21″. They are of laid, hand-made sheets of paper which had been adhered together before printing the repeating ballustrade pattern.

In order to present an account of the wallpaper after “Lindenwald” had passed through the hands of ten owners in 140 years, the authors will describe the scenic wallpaper at the time of their first survey.


Copyright © 1981 American Institute of Historic and Artistic Works