JAIC 1989, Volume 28, Number 2, Article 2 (pp. 67 to 77)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1989, Volume 28, Number 2, Article 2 (pp. 67 to 77)

A STUDY OF ACRYLIC DISPERSIONS USED IN THE TREATMENT OF PAINTINGS

Michael C. Duffy



7 CONCLUSIONS

WITH THESE RESULTS, it appears that Plextol B500 or Lascaux 498 HV would be the most suitable for lining paintings where high adhesive strength is required. Where a lighter bond is needed—perhaps for paper objects or fine fabrics such as silks—the Rhoplexes would be more appropriate. The very high peel strength of the 360 HV would seem to limit its application alone, but it should prove useful in combination with 498 HV to improve tack. Of the solvents tested, toluene was the best choice for swelling these films.

Unfortunately, the long-term reliability of these materials appears questionable, considering the short aging exposure, resulting discoloration, and increased peel strengths. Further testing with longer-term exposure and interim testing are warranted to determine if an actual trend toward irreversibility with aging exists. In the meantime, the results put forth here should be considered when these adhesives are applied to works of art.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

THANKS ARE DUE TO LOWELL PERKINS AND JANET SCHRENK of the Winterthur Museum Program in Art Conservation at the University of Delaware, who served as advisers on this research project. At the University of Delaware, Jeremiah Weaver generously provided assistance in gathering and interpreting peel strength data. Samuel Hudson from DuPont's textile division also provided assistance and encouragement for the project.


Copyright 1989 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works