JAIC 1991, Volume 30, Number 1, Article 4 (pp. 35 to 40)
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Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1991, Volume 30, Number 1, Article 4 (pp. 35 to 40)

THE PIGMENTS OF THE CANOSA VASES: A TECHNICAL NOTE

DAVID A. SCOTT, & MICHAEL SCHILLING




REFERENCES

Derrick, M.1988. Infrared analysis report on the Canosa pigments. Internal Getty Conservation Institute report. Unpublished.

Higgins, R.1956. Magenta ware. The British Museum Yearbook. 1–32.

Mactaggart, P., and A.Mactaggart. 1988. A pigment microscopist's notebook. Unpublished.

Profi, S., L.Weier, and S. E.Filippakis. 1974. X-ray analysis of Greek Bronze Age pigments from Mycenae. Studies in Conservation19:105–112.

Rinuy, A., and F.Schweizer. 1978. Analysis of the white “ground” and ancient adhesives found on Canosa vases (south Italy) of the third century B.C.Proceedings of the 19th International Symposium on Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection: Bonn. 14–17.

Rinuy, A., F. van derWielen, P.Hartmann, and F.Schweizer. 1978. Ceramic insolite de I'Italie du sud: Les vases hellenistiques de Canosa. Extrait de Musée d'Art et d' Histoire: Geneva. N.s. 26. 141–69.

Schilling, M. P., and D. A.Scott. 1989. Letter to the editor. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation28:137.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

DAVID A. SCOTT has been head of the Museum Services Section of the Scientific Program at the Getty Conservation Institute since 1987. He has been a lecturer in conservation at the Institute of Archaeology, University of London, Department of Archaeological Conservation and Materials Science, and, since 1984, an editor of Studies in Conservation. He was named a fellow of the International Institute for Conservation in 1989. His principal research interests are the analysis and technical study of ancient metallic objects and their corrosion products, the conservation of metallic artifacts, the study of Chumash Indian rock art, and the archaeometallurgy of ancient South America, particularly Colombia and Ecuador. Address: Getty Conservation Institute, 4503 Glencoe Avenue, Marina del Rey, Calif. 90292–6537.

Michael Schilling is associate scientist in the Analytical Section and Museum Services Section of the Scientific Program at the Getty Conservation Institute. His principal research interests include methods and application of thermal analysis and the examination and analysis of painted surfaces. Address: Getty Conservation Institute, 4503 Glencoe Avenue, Marina del Rey, Calif. 90292–6537.


Copyright © 1991 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works