JAIC 1993, Volume 32, Number 1, Article 1 (pp. 01 to 14)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1993, Volume 32, Number 1, Article 1 (pp. 01 to 14)

CONSOLIDATION OF POROUS PAINT IN A VAPOR-SATURATED ATMOSPHERE

ERIC F. HANSEN, ROSA LOWINGER, & EILEEN SADOFF


ABSTRACT—When resins are applied for consolidation of a matte paint surface, the colors may darken because of increased surface gloss, the result of the formation of a film over the surface to be protected. Darkening may also occur when resin fills the void space in the powdering paint. A technique is described for consolidating matte, low-gloss, powdery surfaces with minimal if not negligible darkening of the colors. The technique outlined involves the application of a stable thermoplastic resin solution in an atmosphere containing a very high concentration of the solvent used to dissolve the resin, thus slowing solvent evaporation and allowing the resin to penetrate the paint layer and surround the exposed pigment particles. In addition to retaining the matte appearance of the object, “tide lines” may be prevented and adhesion of the pigment may be improved.

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. MATTE PAINT: SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND PIGMENT VOLUME CONCENTRATION
3. CAUSES OF DISCOLORATION
4. METHODS FOR REDUCING CHANGES IN APPEARANCE
5. EXPERIMENTAL
6. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
7. TOXICITY AND SAFETY FACTORS
8. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS
9. CONCLUSIONS
a: Materials , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1993 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works