JAIC 1993, Volume 32, Number 3, Article 2 (pp. 231 to 240)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1993, Volume 32, Number 3, Article 2 (pp. 231 to 240)

THE HARVARD GLASS FLOWERS: MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES

RIKA SMITH McNALLY, & NANCY BUSCHINI




REFERENCES

Baker, M., D.von Endt, W.Hopwood, and D.Erhardt. 1988. FTIR microspectrometry: A powerful conservation analysis tool. AIC preprints, 16th Annual Meeting, American Institute for Conservation, Washington, D.C. 1–13.

Blaschka, R.1896. Letter to Mary Lee Ware, December 1, 1896. Botanical Museum Archives, Harvard University.

Blaschka, R.1900. Letter to Mary Lee Ware, August 27, 1900. Botanical Museum Archives, Harvard University.

Blaschka, R.1906. Letter to Mary Lee Ware, October 28, 1906. Botanical Museum Archives, Harvard University.

Newton, R., and S.Davison. 1989. Conservation of glass. London: Butterworth.

Shultes, R. E., and W. A.Davis. 1982. The glass flowers at Harvard. New York: E. P. Dutton.

Ware, M. L.1928. Letter to Professor Oakes Ames, October 3, 1928. Botanical Museum Archives, Harvard University.

Ware, M. L.1961. How were the glass flowers made?: A letter by Mary Lee Ware. Botanical Museum Leaflets (Harvard University) 19(6) (January 9): 125–36.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

EXPERIMENTAL: The cameca MBX electron beam microprobe at the Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Harvard University, has three wavelength-dispersive spectrometers. The system is equipped with a Tracor Northern TN-5502 EDS system and a TN-1310 WDS and stage automation system. The system was calibrated using mineral standards, and a Corning TVX 321 glass standard was run to confirm accuracy. The Bence-Albee matrix correction program was used.

RIKA SMITH MCNALLY has a B.F.A. from the Rhode Island School of Design and an M.S. in conservation from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Art Conservation Program. She is associate conservator of objects and sculpture at the Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard University Art Museums. Address: Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard University Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138.

NANCY BUSCHINI has a B.S. in biology and art from the University of Massachusetts at Boston and an M.A. in conservation from the Buffalo State College Art Conservation Program. She is assistant conservator of objects and sculpture at the Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard University Art Museums. Address: Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard University Art Museums, 32 Quincy St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138.


Copyright 1993 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works