JAIC 1994, Volume 33, Number 2, Article 7 (pp. 153 to 170)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1994, Volume 33, Number 2, Article 7 (pp. 153 to 170)

INVESTIGATION INTO THE DETERIORATION OF PAINTINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS USING COMPUTERIZED MODELING OF STRESS DEVELOPMENT

MARION F. MECKLENBURG, MARK McCORMICK-GOODHART, & CHARLES S. TUMOSA




REFERENCES

Berger, G. A., and W. H.Russell. 1986. Investigations into the reactions of plastic materials to environmental changes, I: The mechanics of decay of paint films. Studies in Conservation31:49–64.

Berger, G. A., and W. H.Russell. 1988. An evaluation of the preparation of canvas paintings using stress measurements. Studies in Conservation33:187–204.

Cook, R. D.1974. Concepts and applications of finite element analysis. New York: Wiley and Sons. 173–88.

Eastman Kodak Co. 1985. Conservation of photographs. Publication No. F-40..

Hedley, G.1988. Relative humidity and the stress/strain response of canvas paintings: Uniaxial measurements of naturally aged samplesStudies in Conservation33:133–48.

Higdon, A., E. H.Ohlsen, W. B.Stiles, and J. A.Weese. 1967. Mechanics of materials. New York: Wiley and Sons. 58–59.

Karpowicz, A.1989. In-plane deformations of films of size on paintings in the glass transition region. Studies in Conservation34:67–74.

Karpowicz, A.1990. A study on development of cracks on paintings. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation29:169–80.

Mecklenburg, M. F.1982. Some aspects of the mechanical behavior of fabric-supported paintings. Report to the Smithsonian Institution. 12–15.

Mecklenburg, M. F.1991. Some mechanical and physical properties of gilding gesso. In Gilded wood: Conservation and history, ed.D.Bigelow et al. Madison, Conn.: Sound View Press. 163–70.

Mecklenburg, M. F., and C. S.Tumosa. 1991a. An introduction into the mechanical behavior of paintings under rapid loading conditions. In Art in transit, ed.M. F.Mecklenburg. Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art.137–72.

Mecklenburg, M. F., and C. S.Tumosa. 1991b. Mechanical behavior of paintings subjected to changes in temperature and relative humidity. In Art in transit, ed.M. F.Mecklenburg. Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art.172–214.

Mecklenburg, M. F., C. S.Tumosa, and M. H.McCormick-Goodhart. 1993. A general method for determining the mechanical properties needed for the computer analysis of polymeric structures subjected to changes in temperature and relative humidity. In Materials issues in art and archaeology, III, Materials Research Society Proceedings 283, ed.P. B.Vandiver, et al. 337–58.

Michalski, S.1991. Paintings: Their response to temperature, relative humidity, shock, and vibration. In Art in transit, ed.M. F.Mecklenburg. Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art.223–48.

Przemienicki, J. S.1968. Theory of matrix structural analysis. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Sturge, J. M., V.Walworth, and A.Shepp, eds.1989. Imaging processes and materials, 8th ed.New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold. 129–30.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

MARION F. MECKLENBURG has worked as a paintings conservator in the United States for 20 years. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in structural engineering from the University of Maryland. In 1987, he joined the Smithsonian Institution and is currently the assistant director of conservation research at the Conservation Analytical Laboratory. He is also a fellow in the Department of Materials Science, Johns Hopkins University, where he coordinates the joint CAL-JHU Ph.D. graduate program in materials science. His research areas are in the mechanics of materials and the effect of the environment on the mechanical properties of materials. Address: Conservation Analytical Laboratory, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 20560.

MARK H. McCORMICK-GOODHART joined the Smithsonian Institution in 1988 and is currently a research photographic scientist at the Conservation Analytical Laboratory. He holds a B.S. degree in photographic science from Rochester Institute of Technology. From 1976 to 1988 he was employed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., where he was granted eight U.S. patents related to nonsilver film and electronic imaging technology. His research interests concern the effects of environment on structural properties of photographs, and cold storage of photographic materials. Address: Same as for Mecklenburg.

CHARLES S. TUMOSA is head of analytical services at the Conservation Analytical Laboratory and has been at the Smithsonian Institution for five years. He has a Ph.D. in chemistry from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, research interests include the analysis of trace materials and the mechanical properties of materials. Address: Same as for Mecklenburg.

Information and figures from Mecklenburg et al. 1993 have been reprinted by permission of the Materials Research Society.


Copyright 1994 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works