JAIC 1996, Volume 35, Number 2, Article 1 (pp. 79 to 98)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1996, Volume 35, Number 2, Article 1 (pp. 79 to 98)

A CONSERVATION CASE STUDY OF POLYRAMA PANOPTIQUE PAPER VIEWING SLIDES

TED STANLEY



6 CONCLUSIONS

Conserving severely damaged paper viewing slides to a usable state is particularly difficult and arduous because of the unique structures and optical viewing characteristics that must be maintained if the treatment is to be a success. One must take particular care to find solutions that minimize intrusive conservation measures so that the work and intent of the artist are maintained. In this case study an attention to detail, an understanding of the materials, and an appreciation for the artist's intent resulted in laying the groundwork for the future conservation of the collection.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I wish to thank Stephen Ferguson, assistant university librarian; Dale Roylance, curator, Graphic Arts Collection; and Agnes Sherman, special collections assistant at the Princeton University Library for their valuable assistance and encouragement. I would also like to thank Joan Irving, advanced intern, Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for her outstanding contribution to the peepshow paper presented at the 1995 AIC Annual Meeting in St. Paul, Minnesota, during her third-year paper conservation internship at Princeton University. In addition, I would like to thank Richard Balzer, Richard Balzer, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts; Ellen Manyon, curator of recreational artifacts, Strong Museum, Rochester, New York; and Joseph Felcone, rare books dealer, Princeton, New Jersey, for their time and expertise.


Copyright 1996 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works