JAIC 1996, Volume 35, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 109 to 121)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1996, Volume 35, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 109 to 121)

THE ETHICAL DILEMMA FACING CONSERVATION: CARE AND TREATMENT OF HUMAN SKELETAL REMAINS AND MORTUARY OBJECTS

GAYS S. McGOWAN, & CHERYL J. LaROCHE




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AUTHOR INFORMATION

GARY McGOWAN'S field experience includes the excavations at Shiqmim, Israel. After receiving his master's degree from the State University of New York in museum studies/conservation, he apprenticed with Nancy DeMyttenaere from the Bureau of Historic Sites, Peebles Island. He also has developed a number of conservation laboratories, including those at the South Street Seaport Museum, New York City, and John Milner Associates, New York City. He has been a guest lecturer at New York University and Cooper Union. McGowan has also been an adjunct professor for the State University of New York system and is a member of the Steering Committee of the New York Conservation Association. His career spans 10 years and includes involvement with 12 of the New York–area historic and prehistoric archaeological sites. He is currently the principal conservator for the Foley Square/African Burial Ground Project for John Milner Associates. Address: John Milner Associates, 6 World Trade Center, B-26A, New York, N.Y. 10048.

CHERYL LaROCHE received her master's degree in museum studies/conservation from the State University of New York. Her master's thesis topic included archaeometric analysis of glass beads from the African Burial Ground site. She is currently one of the project conservators with John Milner Associates. She assisted Gary McGowan in the oversight and shipment of the human remains from New York City to the bio-anthropology laboratory at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She has also conserved selected artifacts from the First African Baptist Church Cemetery Site, Philadelphia; Newton Plantation, Barbados; and the African Burial Ground, New York City. Most recently, she has been involved in the analysis of glass beads from the 17th-century slave ship, the Henrietta Marie. Address: John Milner Associates, 6 World Trade Center, B-26A, New York, N.Y. 10048.


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