JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 2 (pp. 109 to 126)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 2 (pp. 109 to 126)

ULTRASONIC MISTING. PART 1, EXPERIMENTS ON APPEARANCE CHANGE AND IMPROVEMENT IN BONDING

STEFAN MICHALSKI, & CAROLE DIGNARD


ABSTRACT—Ultrasonic misting is a method of applying consolidation solutions to powdery surfaces that was developed at the Canadian Conservation Institute in 1989. The method was tested with four different consolidants, with water and ethanol carriers, and on binderless powdery paints of seven different pigments. Measurements were made of change in appearance after 1, 4, and 10 applications. Changes in cohesion and adhesion of the paint were measured on three of the pigments. Pigment, solvent, and consolidant all played a significant role in the results. Unacceptable color change can occur after wetting and drying by water alone in clay-type pigments. Gelatin in water gave the widest range of success: acceptable results in all but carbon black.
[Spanish Abstract] [French Abstract]

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. APPEARANCE CHANGE EXPERIMENTS
3. STRENGTH IMPROVEMENT: COHESION AND ADHESION
4. DISCUSSION OF ALL RESULTS: APPEARANCE AND STRENGTH
5. CONCLUSIONS
a: Materials , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1997 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works