JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 127 to 141)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 127 to 141)

ULTRASONIC MISTING. PART 2, TREATMENT APPLICATIONS

CAROLE DIGNARD, ROBYN DOUGLAS, SHERRY GUILD, ANNE MAHEUX, & WANDA McWILLIAMS



1 INTRODUCTION

Ultrasonic misting is a technique for applying conservation solutions to objects. Initially developed at the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) for the consolidation of powdery pigments on ethnographic objects, it has since been modified and used on a broad range of objects for a variety of treatment applications. Compared to other methods of applying conservation solutions—such as by brush, drop, or spray—ultrasonic misting imparts much less physical impact onto the fragile surface under treatment, thus reducing potential for smearing. Misting also allows the conservator to apply smaller quantities of dilute solution in a more localized manner, thus reducing the risk of delivering excessive quantities of solution, which may cause color change or gloss.


Copyright 1997 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works