JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 127 to 141)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 127 to 141)

ULTRASONIC MISTING. PART 2, TREATMENT APPLICATIONS

CAROLE DIGNARD, ROBYN DOUGLAS, SHERRY GUILD, ANNE MAHEUX, & WANDA McWILLIAMS



6 CONCLUSIONS

The ultrasonic mister is a versatile tool for the application of dilute solutions to works of art and artifacts, in particular for the consolidation of flaking and powdery paints on surfaces. The apparatus is economical and easily assembled, and the method of application is straightforward, although it can be labor-intensive because several applications of a relatively low concentration of solution may be required to achieve good results. The ultrasonic mister's main advantage is that it offers a means of finely controlling the quantity, velocity, and location of the solution delivered, advantages that are most useful when treating very fragile surfaces.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors thank Stefan Michalski of the Canadian Conservation Institute for his valuable suggestions and advice. The authors also thank the following individuals who have shared their experience with the ultrasonic mister: Bob Barclay and Carl Bigras of the Canadian Conservation Institute; Ghislain Bérubé, Martha Segal, and Caroline Marchand of the Canadian Museum of Civilization; Greg Hill of the National Archives of Canada; Anne Ruggles of the National Gallery of Canada; Colleen Day and Candace Boyer of Parks Canada, Historic Resource Conservation–Atlantic Region; Heather Dumka of the Glenbow Museum; Lori Van Handel of Williamstown Art Conservation Center; David Arnold of Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; Alexandra Hüttin of the Fachhochschule, Cologne; Donald Humphrey, private conservator, Calgary, Alberta; Diana Dicus, private conservator, Boise, Idaho; and Peter Newlands, private conservator, Ottawa, Ontario.


Copyright © 1997 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works