JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 127 to 141)
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Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 2, Article 3 (pp. 127 to 141)

ULTRASONIC MISTING. PART 2, TREATMENT APPLICATIONS

CAROLE DIGNARD, ROBYN DOUGLAS, SHERRY GUILD, ANNE MAHEUX, & WANDA McWILLIAMS


ABSTRACT—Ultrasonic misting is a technique useful for applying small amounts of dilute solutions to objects, particularly for the consolidation of pigment or other thin layers on various types of artifacts and works of art. The equipment is economical and easily assembled, and the method of application is straightforward, although it can be labor-intensive because several applications of a relatively low concentration of solution may be required to achieve good results. The ultrasonic mister's main advantage is that it offers a means of finely controlling the quantity, velocity, and location of the solution delivered. This control is most important when treating very fragile objects. In this paper, the equipment and commonly used consolidants are described, and the authors outline several examples of the application of the ultrasonic mister, including the treatment of the paper gauge of a mica compass, two charcoal drawings, an ink drawing with watercolor, a gouache painting, a pastel and gouache drawing, an oil painting, the paper leaf of a Mandarin fan, the paper head of a dragon kite, four Melanesian tree fern figures, burned archaeological thatch, and red-rotted leather. These examples illustrate the versatility of the ultrasonic mister on a diverse range of objects; complete treatment details are not presented.
[Spanish Abstract] [French Abstract]

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION
2. EQUIPMENT, SETUP, METHOD, AND MISTING SOLUTIONS
3. HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS
4. TREATMENT APPLICATIONS
5. TREATMENT LIMITATIONS AND POTENTIAL
6. CONCLUSIONS
a: Materials , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 1997 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works