JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 3, Article 2 (pp. 193 to 206)
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Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1997, Volume 36, Number 3, Article 2 (pp. 193 to 206)

MOISTURE RELATIONSHIPS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM

P.Z. ADELSTEIN, J.-L. BIGOURDAN, & J.M. REILLY




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AUTHOR INFORMATION

PETER Z. ADELSTEIN received a B. Eng. in chemistry from McGill University, Canada, in 1946 and a Ph. D. in chemistry from the same university in 1949. He was employed at the Eastman Kodak Co. from 1949 to 1986, retiring as unit director of a product development laboratory. Since that time he has been a senior research consultant at the Image Permanence Institute. He chairs national and international committees on the permanence of imaging materials. Address: Image Permanence Institute, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, N.Y. 14623.

JEAN-LOUIS BIGOURDAN obtained a B.S. in chemistry in 1973, a diploma in chemistry from the Institut Universitaire de Technologie, Poitiers, France, in 1979, and a diploma in museum studies in 1986 from the Ecole Nationale de la Photographie, Arles, France. He received an M.S. in art conservation from the Institut Français de Restauration des Oeuvres d'Art, Paris, in 1993. Since 1994 he has been studying the effect of enclosures on film storage at the Image Permanence Institute. Address as for Adelstein.

JAMES M. REILLY graduated with a B.A. from Franklin and Marshall College in 1968 and an M.A. from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1972. He has continued his education in science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. In 1984 he was appointed director of the Photo Preservation Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and the following year he organized and was made director of the Image Permanence Institute at the same institution. He is also a full professor in the School of Photographic Arts and Science. Address as for Adelstein.


Copyright © 1997 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works