JAIC 1998, Volume 37, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 211 to 221)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 1998, Volume 37, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 211 to 221)

EVIDENCE OF REPLICATION IN A PORTRAIT OF ELEONORA OF TOLEDO BY AGNOLO BRONZINO AND WORKSHOP

SERENA URRY



NOTES

. Firenze, Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Collezione Carande, nos. 2402 and 2402/C. “Teletta d'argento con velluto, Fondo di teletta d'argento; disegno di velluto tagliato e broccato d'oro ed'argento arriciato. Materiale: seta, oro, argento. Colori: fondo argento, bianco; disegno verde, oro, argento.”



REFERENCES

Arnold, J.1995. Cut and construction. In Moda alla corte dei Medici: Gli abiti restaurati di Cosimo, Eleonora e don Garzia. Florence: Centro Di della Edifimil. 49–73.

Berenson, B.1963. Italian pictures of the Renaissance. London: Phaidon Press.

Cochrane, E.1973. Florence in the forgotten centuries, 1527–1800. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Landini, R. O.1995. L'amore del lusso e la necessita della modestia Eleonora fra sete e oro. In Moda alla corte dei Medici: Gli abiti restaurati di Cosimo, Eleonora e don Garzia. Florence: Centro Di della Edifimil. 35–45.

May, F.1965. Spanish broacades for royal ladies. Pantheon23:8–16.

McComb, A.1928. Agnolo Bronzino: His life and works. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Plesters, J.1969. A preliminary note on the incidence of discolouration of smalt in oil media. Studies in Conservation14:62–74.

Santi, B.1976. Neri di Bicci Le Ricordanze. Pisa: Edizioni Marlin.

Simon, R. B.1983. Bronzino's portrait of Cosimo in armour. Burlington Magazine. 125:527–39.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

SERENA URRY received a B.A. in art history from Tufts University and an M.A. in art history and diploma in conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. Since 1989, she has worked at the Detroit Institute of Arts, where she is currently an associate conservator of paintings. In March 1997 she was a scholar-in-residence at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center, where much of this article was written. Address: Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48202.


Copyright 1998 American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works