JAIC , Volume 39, Number 1, Article 5 (pp. to )
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC , Volume 39, Number 1, Article 5 (pp. to )

ATOMIC OXYGEN TREATMENT AS A METHOD OF RECOVERING SMOKE-DAMAGED PAINTINGS

SHARON K. RUTLEDGE, BRUCE A. BANKS, MARK FORKAPA, THOMAS STUEBER, EDWARD SECHKAR, & KEVIN MALINOWSKI



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors would like to thank Mr. Richard Moore of Bonfoey Company in Cleveland, Ohio, and Mr. Kenneth Bé of the Cleveland Museum of Art for donating some heavily fire-damaged paintings for our testing and also for providing very helpful comments, discussion, and advice. We would also like to thank Father Bob Weaver and the members of St. Alban's Episcopal Church for providing information about the Madonna painting and for their interest and enthusiasm surrounding its cleaning.



REFERENCES

Banks, B. A., S. K.Rutledge, J. A.Brady, and J. E.Merrow. 1988. Atomic oxygen effects on materials. In NASA/SDIO Space Environmental Effects on Materials Workshop. NASA conference publication 3035. Hampton, Va.: NASA. 197–239.

Banks, B. A., and S. K.Rutledge. 1988. Low earth orbital atomic oxygen simulation for materials durability evaluation. In Proceedings of the Fourth European Symposium on Spacecraft Materials in the Space Environment, CERT, Toulouse, France, September 6–9. Toulouse, France: ONEAA Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches de Toulouse. 371–92.

Banks, B. A., S. K.Rutledge, P. E.Paulsen, and T. J.Stueber. 1989. Simulation of low earth orbital atomic oxygen interaction with materials by means of an oxygen ion beam. Presented at the 18th Annual Symposium on Applied Vacuum Science and Technology. NASA TM-101971.

Banks, B. A., and S. K.Rutledge. 1996. Process for non-contact removal of organic coatings from the surface of paintings. U.S. Patent # 5,560,781. Assigned to B. A. Banks and S. K. Rutledge.

Dever, J. A.1991. Low earth orbital atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects on polymers. NASA TM-103711.

Rutledge, S. K., B. A.Banks, and M.Cales. 1994. Atomic oxygen treatment for non-contact removal of organic protective coatings from painting surfaces. In Materials Issues in Art and Archaeology, vol. 4. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 352, ed. P. Vandiver, J. Druzik, J. L. Galvan Madrid, I. Freestone, and G. Segan Wheeler. Pittsburgh: Materials Research Society. 161–66. NASA TM-106650.

Rutledge, S. K., and B. A.Banks. 1996. Atomic oxygen treatment technique for removal of smoke damage from paintings. Presented at the Materials Research Society Meeting. NASA TM-107403.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

SHARON K. RUTLEDGE has been employed by NASA Lewis Research Center for 17 years as a research engineer. Her primary focus as a member of the Electro-Physics Branch is on the durability and prevention of degradation of power system materials for satellites and spacecraft operating in low Earth orbit. She has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Cleveland State University (CSU), and master's degrees both in materials science and engineering and in business from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Address: John H. Glenn Research Center, Lewis Field, Mail Code 309-2, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135-3191

BRUCE A. BANKS is the chief of the Electro-Physics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. He has been employed by NASA for 32 years as a physicist. His current primary field of interest is power system material durability in low Earth orbit. He has a bachelor degree in physics from Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland, and a master's degree in physics from the University of Missouri at Rolla. Address as for Rutledge.

MARK FORKAPA was employed by NYMA Inc. as a mechanical design engineer. Currently he is employed by DuPont Tribon Composites in Cleveland, Ohio. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Cleveland State University. Address: DuPont Tribon Composites, 6200 Hillcrest Dr., Cleveland, Ohio 44125

THOMAS STUEBER provides electrical design services through NYMA Inc. He has a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Cleveland State University and is currently pursuing a doctoral degree. Address as for Rutledge.

EDWARD SECHKAR provides mechanical design services through NYMA Inc. He has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Cleveland State University. Address as for Rutledge.

KEVIN MALINOWSKI was an undergraduate student at Cleveland State University and performed research in mechanical design while working on-site at NASA for CSU. He recently graduated from the mechanical engineering program at CSU with a bachelor's degree. Address: Unavailable.