JAIC 2001, Volume 40, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 125 to 136)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2001, Volume 40, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 125 to 136)

THE CONSERVATION OF WET MEDIEVAL WINDOW GLASS: A TEST USING AN ETHANOL AND ACETONE MIXED SOLVENT SYSTEM

D. R. GRIFFITHS, & A. M. FEUERBACH



NOTES

1. As the work was done in Britain and funds were limited, industrial methylated spirits (IMS) were in fact used instead of ethanol. IMS is composed primarily of ethanol, and it is not thought that its use made any significant difference to the process. The word “ethanol” has been used in the text in the interests of general comprehension. Pure ethanol can be difficult to obtain or prohibitively expensive because of taxation by national governments.



REFERENCES

Alten, H. I.1988. Changes in waterlogged medieval window glass. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings123:279–84.

Brill, R. H.1975. Crizzling: A problem in glass conservation. In Conservation in archaeology and the applied arts: Preprints. Contributions to the Stockhom Congress, June 2–6. London: International Institute for the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 121–31.

Davison, S.1994. Personal communication. Formerly at Institute of Archaeology, University College London, U.K.

Hench, L. L., and D. E.Clark. 1978. Physical chemistry of glass surfaces. Journal Non-Crystalline Solids28:83–105.

Horie, C. V.1987. Materials for conservation. London: Butterworths.

Johnson, R.2001. Personal communication. Museum of London, London, U.K.

Metcalfe, A. G., M. E.Gulden, and G. K.Schmidt. 1971. Spontaneous cracking of glass filaments. Glass Technology12:15–23.

Newton, R. G.1969. Some further observations on the weathering crusts on ancient glasses. Glass Technology10:40–42.

Newton, R. G., and S.Davison. 1989. Conservation of glass.London: Butterworths.

Pollard, A. M., and C.Heron. 1996. Archaeological chemistry. Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Raw, F.1955. The long-continued action of water on window-glass: Weathering of the medieval glass of Weoley Castle, Birmingham. Journal of the Society of Glass Technology39:128T–33T.

Weyl, W. A., and E. C.Marboe. 1962–67. The constitution of glasses: A dynamic interpretation, Vols. 1, 2 pt. I, and 2 pt. II. New York: Interscience.


AUTHOR INFORMATION

DAFYDD GRIFFITHS, B.Sc., Ph.D., has been a lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London (UCL), since 1985. He works on the physical and chemical analysis of inorganic materials (particularly ceramics and glass) with a view to understanding the processes of their decay, the technology of their manufacture, and their provenance. He is interested in developing improved methods for conserving the information content of artifacts. Address: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY, U.K.

ANN FEUERBACH took an M.A. in fine arts before reading for her B.Sc. in archaeological conservation and M.Sc. in archaeometallurgy at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. She is currently reading for a doctorate at UCL on the manufacture and use of crucible steel in Central Asia during the early Islamic period. Address as for Griffiths.


Copyright 2001 American Institution for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works