JAIC 2001, Volume 40, Number 3, Article 4 (pp. 211 to 231)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2001, Volume 40, Number 3, Article 4 (pp. 211 to 231)

TOWARD GUIDELINES FOR PRACTICE IN THE PRESERVATION AND DOCUMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY-BASED INSTALLATION ART

WILLIAM A. REAL



NOTES

1. The term “installation art” commonly describes site-specific works, generally within interior spaces, that may also include sound, moving images, or other media components, as well as architecture, performance, and other forms of technology. “Media art” often describes work whose primary component is recorded or live sound and moving images or projected still images, whether or not within an installation context. The work considered in this article 227 is located at the intersection of installation art and media art and appears to have no satisfactory label. Since many of the article's conclusions may apply equally well to installation art in general, that term will be used, along with “technology-based installation,” when a narrower descriptor is needed.



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FURTHER READING

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AUTHOR INFORMATION

WILLIAM REAL is currently director of technology initiatives at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, where he also served as chief conservator from 1985 to 2001. He has recently directed a conservation survey grant for the magnetic media in the collection of the Andy Warhol Museum and has served on the AIC Electronic Media Group board and the AIC board. Address: Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213–4080.


Copyright © 2001 American Institution for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works