JAIC 2002, Volume 41, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 139 to 154)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2002, Volume 41, Number 2, Article 4 (pp. 139 to 154)

STUCCOED TRIPOD VESSELS FROM TEOTIHUACÁN: AN EXAMINATION OF MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURE

Jessica M. Fletcher



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The author would like to thank Professor Cynthia Conides, from the Buffalo State College History Department, for all of her help and for bringing this project to my attention;William Sanders, professor of anthropology at Pennsylvania State University, for permission to sample the sherds; Samantha Alderson, at the American Museum of Natural History, for providing essential background information and bibliographies on stuccoed murals and ceramics from Mesoamerica; Charles Kolb, at the National Endowment for the Humanities, for his guidance in editing; and Peter Bush at the South Campus Instrumentation Center for the SEM analysis. In the Buffalo State College Art Conservation Department, I am especially indebted to Professors F. Christopher Tahk and Ruth Norton for their tireless efforts.


NOTES

1. A Hitachi S-4000 scanning electron microscope with a Princeton Gamma-Tech IMIX System was used to perform elemental analysis.

2. Powder photographs were obtained by the Debye-Scherrer method using a Philips PW 1720 x-ray generator at 40 kV/20 mA. Exposure time was 45 minutes for all samples except for 8791–108, in which case the exposure took one hour.

3. FTIR spectra were recorded using a Nicolet Magna–IR 560 spectrometer with OMNIC software and a SplitPea microsample accessory at 2 lbs. pressure. Samples 1804–62, 8345–65, and 8772–69 were collected with 32 scans, while samples 8685–67, 8809–71, and 8819–72 were collected using 64 scans.



REFERENCES

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FURTHER READING

Albro, S. R., and T. C.Albr. II. 1990. The examination and conservation treatment of the Library of Congress Harkness 1531 Huejotzingo Codex. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation29:97–115.

Barba, L., J. L.Córdova, K. F.Link, and A.Ortiz. 1995. New studies in the building materials of Teotihuacán, Mexico. In Materials issues in art and archaeology, vol. 4. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 352, ed. P. B.Vandive. et al. 491–96.

Beaubien, H. F.1993. From codex to calabash: Recovery of a painted organic artifact from the archaeological site of Cerén, El Salvador. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation32:153–64.

Berrin, K., ed.1988. Feathered serpents and flowering trees: Reconstructing the murals of Teotihuacán. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

Conides, C. A.2001. The stuccoed and painted ceramics from Teotihuacán, Mexico: A study of authorship of works of art from an ancient Mesoamerican city. Ph. D. diss., Columbia University, New York.

Gettens, R. J.1955. Identification of pigments on fragments of mural paintings from Bonampak, Chiapas, Mexico. In Bonampak, Chiapas, Mexico, K. Rupert et al. Publication 602, app.Washington, D.C.: Carnegie Institution.

Hansen, E. F., C.Rodriguez-Navarro, and R. D.Hansen. 1997. Incipient Maya burnt-lime technology: Characterization and chronological variations in preclassic plaster, stucco and mortar at Nakbe, Guatemala. In Materials issues in art and archaeology, vol. 5. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 462, ed. P. B.Vandive. et al. 207–15.

Kolb, C. C.1988. The cultural ecology of classic Teotihuacán period copoid ceramics. In A pot for all reasons: Ceramic ecology revisited, eds. C. C.Kol. and L. M.Lackey. Special publication of Ceramica de cultura maya et al. Philadelphia: Temple University Laboratory of Anthropology. 147–97.

Littman, E. R.1957. Ancient Mesoamerican mortars, plasters, and stuccos: Comalcalco, Part 1. American Antiquity23:135–40.

Littman, E. R.1958. Ancient Mesoamerican mortars, plasters, and stuccos: The composition and origin of sascab. American Antiquity24:172–76.

Littman, E. R.1959. Ancient Mesoamerican mortars, plasters, and stuccos: Las Flores, Tampico. American Antiquity25:117–19.

Littman, E. R.1959. Ancient Mesoamerican mortars, plasters, and stuccos: Palenque, Chiapas. American Antiquity25:264–66.

Littman, E. R.1960. Ancient Mesoamerican mortars, plasters, and stuccos: Floor construction at Uaxactun. American Antiquity25:407–12.

Littman, E. R.1960. Ancient Mesoamerican mortars, plasters, and stuccos: The use of bark extracts in lime plasters. American Antiquity25:593–97.

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Magaloni, D., M.Aguilar, and V.Castaño. 1991. Electron and optical microscopy of prehispanic mural paintings. In Materials issues in art and archaeology, vol. 2. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 185, ed. P. B.Vandive. et al. 145–51.

Magaloni, D., R.Sigel, V.Castaño, R.Lee, and L.Baños. 1992. Electron microscopy studies of the chronological sequences of Teotihuacán plaster technique. In Materials issues in art and archaeology, vol. 3. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 267, ed. P. B.Vandive. et al. 997–1005.

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AUTHOR INFORMATION

JESSICA FLETCHER is currently the assistant conservator at the Denver Art Museum. She received her master's degree in 2000 from the Conservation Department at the State University College at Buffalo, with a concentration in objects conservation. In April 2000 she participated in a special project at the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. While there, she assisted in the scientific analysis of a 19th-dynasty royal Egyptian mummy. In 1993, she received her B.A. from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, with majors in both studio art and anthropology. While living in New Orleans, she did archaeological field work in the historic French Quarter. Address: Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Avenue Pkwy., Denver, Colo. 80204.


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