JAIC 2003, Volume 42, Number 2, Article 9 (pp. 341 to 362)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2003, Volume 42, Number 2, Article 9 (pp. 341 to 362)

BEVA 371 AND ITS USE AS AN ADHESIVE FOR SKIN AND LEATHER REPAIRS: BACKGROUND AND A REVIEW OF TREATMENTS

LISA KRONTHAL, JUDITH LEVINSON, CAROLE DIGNARD, ESTHER CHAO, & JANE DOWN




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SUPPLIERS

Paraloid F-10

Rohm and Haas Co. Independence Mall West Philadelphia, Pa. 19126

BEVA 371 film (1 mil and 2.5 mil)

Conservator's Products Company P.O. Box 411 Chatham, N.J. 07928

BEVA 371 solution

Conservator's Products Company P.O. Box 411 Chatham, N.J. 07928

Cellulose powder

Whatman cellulose powder for partition chromatography Fisher Scientific 4500 Turnberry Dr. Hanover Park, Il. 60103 (630) 259-1200 (800) 772-6733 www.fishersci.com

Cerex—nylon gossamer

Talas 568 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 219–0770 www.talasonline.com

Glass microballoons, 3M Scotchlite glass bubbles, goldbeater's skin

Talas 568 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 219–0770 www.talasonline.com

Hollytex—spun polyester

Talas 568 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 219–0770 www.talasonline.com

Lascaux 498HV

Talas 568 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 219–0770 www.talasonline.com

Paper pulp, 289 pulp, ash-free analytical filter paper

Schleicher and Schuell Keene, N.H. 03431

Reemay—spun polyester

Talas 568 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 219–0770 www.talasonline.com


AUTHOR INFORMATION

LISA KRONTHAL received a B.A. in art history from the University of Rochester in 1988 and an M.A and certificate of advanced study in art conservation from the State University College at Buffalo in 1993. She began working at the American Museum of Natural History in 1994 as a conservator in the Anthropology Division specializing in archae-ological and ethnographic objects and is currently the conservator of Natural Sciences Collections working out of the Office of the Associate Dean of Science for Collections. She is a professional associate of AIC and currently cochairs the conservation committee within the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections (SPNHC). Address: American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, N.Y. 10024.

JUDITH LEVINSON received a B.A. with honors in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania (1973), a master's of fine arts (1977) from the Cran-brook Academy of Art, an M.A. in art history and a certificate in conservation from New York University, as well as a certificate in objects conservation from Harvard University, Fogg Art Museum. She has worked as head conservator in the Anthropology Department at the American Museum of Natural History since 1985 and has been an adjunct professor of conservation at the Conservation Center, New York University, since 1989. Address: Anthropology Department, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, N.Y. 10024.

CAROLE DIGNARD has a B.Sc. in physics and Italian (1981) and an honors B.A in classical studies (1983) from the University of Ottawa, and a master's degree in art conservation (1986) from Queen's University. She has been working in the objects section of the Canadian Conservation Institute since 1988. She is a professional associate of AIC (1993) and an accredited member of the Canadian Association of Professional Conservators (1994). She was one of the instructors of the Canadian Conservation Institute's workshop “Adhesives for Textiles and Leather Conservation: Research and Application,” which was delivered four times between 1999 and 2001. Address: Canadian Conservation Institute, 1030 Innes Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0M5

ESTHER CHAO graduated summa cum laude from the University of Arizona with a B.A. in anthropology and a B.A. in art history in 1996. She received an M.A. in art history and a certificate in art conservation from the Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2001, specializing in objects conservation. She completed her fourth-year internship at the American Museum of Natural History and is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian. She is currently working in the conservation laboratory at the Peabody Museum, Harvard University. Address: Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Conservation Department, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02138

JANE L. DOWN graduated from Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, with an honors B.Sc. in chemistry and mathematics in 1973. In 1978, she joined the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) and is the senior conservation scientist who is responsible for all adhesive research done at the institute as well as answering the numerous adhesive-related inquiries that CCI receives worldwide each year. She has published many papers and articles on adhesives, presented her work at various national and international conferences, and organized and taught several adhesive workshops, including CCI's “Adhesives for Textile and Leather Conservation: Research and Application.” She is an accredited member of the Canadian Association of Professional Conservators and a Fellow of the International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. Address as for Dignard.


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