JAIC 2003, Volume 42, Number 2, Article 10 (pp. 363 to 380)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2003, Volume 42, Number 2, Article 10 (pp. 363 to 380)

PRIOR REPAIRS: WHEN SHOULD THEY BE PRESERVED?

JEAN D. PORTELL



NOTES

1. The newspaper article that describes Frederic E. Church's purchase and treatment of a painting that now hangs at Olana is so pertinent, and so interesting, that my frustration at being unable to read crucial phrases led me to seek another photocopy. (Joyce Martindale, Texas Christian University's librarian, kindly provided one.) Thus, I discovered that this article may survive only as microfilm copies in a few scattered libraries and that all the copies may derive from the same imperfect master film. The thought of losing access to published writings of this kind prompts me to add this note—a plea for the preservation of old periodicals.



REFERENCES

Barger, M.2002. Personal communication. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Brooks, C.1998. Videotape preservation: Ethical considerations. In Playback: A primer for video, ed. S. J.Fifer, T.Gould, L.Hones, D. H.Norris, P.Ramey, and K.Weiner. San Francisco: Bay Area Video Coalition.

Ginsberg, S.2000. Washington's final wishes: Restoring pages of first president's will “humbling” for Va. woman. Washington Post, December 14, B1, B4.

Hail, B. A., ed.2000. Gifts of pride and love: Kiowa and Comanche cradles. Bristol, R. I.: Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University.

Hail, B. A.2002. Personal communication. Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University.

Henry, W.2000. Digital preservation: A conservator's perspective. Paper presented at the Second Annual Stanford-California State Library Institute on 21st Century Librarianship, available at http://cpc.stanford.edu/ppt/henry-digpres (accessed February 26, 2002).

Henry, W.2002. Personal communication. Preservation Department, Stanford University Libraries.

Herzogenrath, W., B.Otterbeck, and C.Scheidermann. 1997. Nam June Paik: An interview with the artist. Wie haltbar ist Videokunst? How durable is video art? Proceedings of a symposium at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, November 25, 1995, ed. B.Otterbeck and C.Scheidemann. Wolfsburg, Germany: Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg. 103–7.

Jaeschke, R., and H.Jaeschke. 1988. Early conservation techniques in the Petrie Museum. In Conservation of ancient Egyptian materials, ed. S. C.Watkins and C. E.Brown. London: Institute of Archaeology Publications, United Kingdom Institute for Conservation Archaeology Section. 17–23.

Koob, S. P.1999. Restoration skill or deceit: Manufactured replacement fragments on a Seljuk lusterglazed ewer. In The conservation of glass and ceramics, ed. N. H.Tennent. London: James & James. 156–66.

Messier, P.1998. Criteria for assessing digital video as a preservation medium. In Playback: A primer for video, ed. S. J.Fifer, T.Gould, L.Hones, D. H.Norris, P.Ramey, and K.Weiner. San Francisco: Bay Area Video Coalition.

Miller, T. L.1991. Museum to return Zuni statues. Downtown News (now The Brooklyn Paper), Brooklyn, N. Y, 14(15): April 12–18.

Norman, M.1988. Early conservation techniques and the Ashmolean Museum. In Conservation of ancient Egyptian materials, ed. S. C.Watkins and C. E.Brown. London: United Kingdom Institute for Conservation Archaeology Section. 7–16.

O'Donnell, A. A.2002. Personal communication. ArtCare Resources, Newport, Rhode Island.

Podany, J.1995. Flaked, flayed or fractured? Development of loss compensation approaches for antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Loss Compensation: Technical and Philosophical Issues. AIC Objects Specialty Group postprints 2. Proceedings of the Objects Specialty Group Session, American Institute for Conservation 22nd Annual Meeting, Nashville, Tennessee, ed. E.Pearlstein and M.Marincola. Washington, D. C.: AIC. 38–56.

Real, William A.2001. Toward guidelines for practice in the preservation and documentation of technology-based installation art. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation40:211–31.

Smith, Christine. 2002. Personal communication. Conservation of Art on Paper Inc., Alexandria, Virginia.

Stein, R.2002. Personal communication. Conservator, Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University.

Stein, R., K.Singley, M.Leveque, A.Klingelhofer, and R.Harvey. 2002. Restorations revisited: Ancient and modern repairs encountered in the collection of an ancient Egyptian collection. AIC Objects Specialty Group postprints 8. Proceedings of the Objects Specialty Group Session, American Institute for Conservation 29th Annual Meeting, Dallas, Texas, ed. V.Greene and L.Bruno. Washington, D.C.: AIC. 2–14.

Stella, F.2002. Personal communication.

Vitale, T.2001. Techarchaeology: Works by James Coleman and Vito Acconci. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation40(3):233–58.

Wolfe, S. J., and L.Mibach. 1983. Ethical considerations in the conservation of Native American sacred objects. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation23:1–6.

Wythe, D.2002. Personal communication. Archivist, Brooklyn Museum of Art.

Zucker, J.2002. Personal communication. New York State Bureau of Historic Sites, Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation.



FURTHER READING

Fane, D., I.Jaknis, and L. M.Breen. 1991. Objects of Myth and Memory: American Indian Art at the Brooklyn Museum. Exhibition catalog. Brooklyn, N. Y.: Brooklyn Museum.

Native American Art Exhibit. 1992. Transcript of a discussion broadcast on March 4, 1992, on National Public Radio/Morning Edition, Brad Klein reporting. Washington, D.C.: National Public Radio. Accessed at http://www.npr.org. The repatriation of 13 Zuni war gods is mentioned. 379


AUTHOR INFORMATION

JEAN D. PORTELL is an independent conservator of sculptural objects. After receiving her bachelor of arts degree from Vassar College in 1962, she studied easel painting at the former Brooklyn Museum Art School. During this time she also worked as an office volunteer in the museum's Painting Conservation Laboratory, which was then headed by Caroline K. Keck. The museum hired her in December 1962 to assist Anton J. Konrad in creating a new conservation laboratory for the Department of Primitive Art and New World Cultures. During 1964–66, while living in Canada, she was hired by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts to equip and manage its first conservation laboratory and assist the museum's visiting consultant conservators. Returning to New York in 1966, she continued training in sculpture conservation with Konrad at his private studio in Brooklyn. In 1967, when the Museum of Modern Art hired Konrad to open its first sculpture conservation lab, she was hired to assist him. She worked part-time at MoMA (1967–69 and 1971–78) and also at Nelson Rocke-feller's Museum of Primitive Art (1968–70), where she assisted Jeanne Kostich. In 1978 she started a fulltime practice in sculpture conservation based in Brooklyn. For the past several years, she has also been researching the history of art conservation in the United States. Address: 13 Garden Place, Brooklyn, NY 11201.


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