JAIC 2003, Volume 42, Number 3, Article 2 (pp. 399 to 406)
JAIC online
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation
JAIC 2003, Volume 42, Number 3, Article 2 (pp. 399 to 406)

INFRARED MICROSPECTROSCOPY USING A SYNCHROTRON SOURCE FOR ARTS-SCIENCE RESEARCH

GREGORY D. SMITH


ABSTRACT—The nature of radiation from synchrotron storage rings is discussed with emphasis on the advantages, in particular that of brightness, that this light source offers when replacing the thermal source typically employed in a conventional infrared microscope. Specifically, synchrotron radiation allows the collection of high signal-to-noise ratio infrared spectra with diffraction-limited spatial resolution across the entire near-, mid-, and far-infrared spectral range. This level of performance permits the spatially resolved analysis of microscopic samples from artwork and artifacts down to ~ 4 μm in the mid-infrared spectral region and potentially much smaller dimensions, for both organic and inorganic components. Conservation and archaeological scientists are alerted to the worldwide availability of these microscopy facilities for occasional use by museums and galleries free of charge.
[Spanish Abstract] [French Abstract]

Article Sections:

1. INTRODUCTION AND DISCUSSION
2. CONCLUSIONS
a: Notes , References , Author Information
Entire Article

Copyright 2003 American Institution for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works